Auctions

This One-of-a-Kind McLaren F1 Will Be Auctioned Off at Monterey Car Week

This One-of-a-Kind McLaren F1 Will Be Auctioned Off at Monterey Car Week

McLaren F1s don’t come more unique then this.

A one-of-a-kind 1998 example of Gordon Murray’s iconic supercar will be auctioned off by RM Sotheby’s at Monterey Car Week. This particular example is the only F1 to leave the factory with revised headlights that make it easier to see at night.
The F1 is the kind of vehicle that changed things forever. When McLaren’s first road car arrived in 1992, it mixed style and performance in a way that few cars ever have. The Peter Stevens-designed exterior—with its athletic lines, bubble cockpit and butterfly doors—has rarely been topped in the 30 years since its debut. The ultra-lightweight speed machine’s capabilities have aged just as well. Thanks to a BMW-sourced, naturally aspirated 6.1-liter V-12 mated to a transverse six-speed manual transmission, the F1 could reach a top speed of 240.1 mph, a feat that made it the world’s fastest car for over a decade.

This McLaren F1 features the internal headlamps from a BMW Z1 roadster 

RM Sotheby’s

The F1 may be one of the history’s truly great cars, but it’s not perfect. One glaring flaw was its stock headlights, which were notably dim at night, according to the auction house. In attempt to fix the issue, McLaren built one F1 with the internal headlamps from the BMW Z1 roadster and shortened the housing surrounding the lights to account for the modification. This car, chassis no. 059, was the only example to roll off the line with the feature.
Even without its revised headlights, this one-off F1 would be exclusive. McLaren only built 106 examples of its first supercar, just 64 of which were constructed to street-legal specification. The example RM Sotheby’s is selling is one of those. It’s finished in silver, one of the colors most closely associated with the model, and has all the original parts it left the factory with, including its beastly V-12. With 16,400 miles on the odometer, it is more than just a display piece, though it does look to be in impeccable shape.

Inside the 1998 F1 

RM Sotheby’s

With barely more than 100 examples out there, it’s not every day that an F1 goes up for grabs. This particular example hasn’t been seen in more than a decade, so chances are you’ll have to be ready to spend big to get your hands on it. RM Sotheby’s hasn’t announced an estimate for the vehicle, but street-legal examples regularly sell for more than $2 million (and can reach as high as $20 million) on the rare occasion they hit the open market.

Click here to see all the photos of the one-of-a-kind McLaren F1.

RM Sotheby’s

This 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera Was Paul Walker’s Dream Car. Now It’s Up for Grabs.

This 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera Was Paul Walker’s Dream Car. Now It’s Up for Grabs.

Back during the salad days of the Fast and Furious franchise, the classic Porsche market was already venerating the legendary 911 Carrera RS 2.7. 

Produced for only one year, the so-called ducktail 911 earned its rightful place in history through its pared down adherence to racing homologation rules and more powerful version of Porsche’s notorious flat-6 powerplant. The rigorously streamlined 911 drew the admiration of enthusiasts from the get-go, achieving its initial estimate of 500 sales so quickly that production was later tripled, with 1,580 units of the aggressively tuned two-seater eventually rolling off the line.

Among those smitten by the RS’s specialness was late actor, racer and all-around car enthusiast Paul Walker, who purchased a 1973 example on the internet in 2011. Walker enthused about the car on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, claiming that he bought the two-seater sight unseen, because it was from, “the golden era of Porsche, [and was built] the year I was born.” Walker’s collection would later encompass an eclectic, but thematically cohesive selection of cars that included numerous BMW E36 Lightweights, a Nissan R32 Skyline race car and a ’64 Chevrolet Chevelle Wagon. 

Paul Walker’s Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 

Mecum Auctions

RS values have skyrocketed in the years since. Hagerty estimates that a “Concours” condition RS was worth around $335,000 when Walker bought his, but puts that number at closer to $900,000 today. Walker’s light yellow RS will likely punch through to an even higher stratosphere when it crosses the Mecum auction block in Monterey in a few weeks.
Before Walker’s untimely death in a car accident in 2013, he undoubtedly enjoyed RS chassis No. 9113600901 for its lightweight construction and decidedly analog-era mechanical honesty. In its day, it was the first car tested by a German trade magazine to achieve 0 to 62 mph in under six seconds, according to Porsche. 

This particular numbers-matching RS has 58,268 miles on the clock and a rebuilt drivetrain, brakes and suspension, as well as a reupholstered interior. It appears to be a clean and diligently cared-for example that would do well at any event. Add in the Paul Walker effect, and the right bidders might hit the nitro boost and land well beyond Mecum’s $1 million to $1.25 million estimate.

Click here to see all the photos of Paul Walker’s 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7.

Mecum Auctions

This Rare, Street-Legal Jaguar XJR-15 Could Sell for up to $1.4 Million at Auction

This Rare, Street-Legal Jaguar XJR-15 Could Sell for up to $1.4 Million at Auction

An ultra-exclusive road car based on one of Jaguar’s greatest racers is about to go up for grabs.

RM Sotheby’s will auction off a 1991 XJR-15 as part of its upcoming Monterey Car Week sales slate. Not only is the stunning speed machine one of the best looking supercars of the 1990s, it’s also one of only 27 examples that were street legal.
At the dawn of the 1990s, Jaguar was back on top of the endurance racing world. The British marque had been a winner’s circle fixture during the ‘50s, but had gone decades without tasting victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. A Jag finally reclaimed the checkered flag in 1988 and repeated the feat in 1990. Those races were won by two different (but related) cars, the XJR-9 and XJR-12, both of which were built by Tom Wilkenshaw Racing. The builder was able to convince the automaker that there would be interest in a road car inspired by the winning racers. This would end up being the XJR-15, which featured a chassis based on the one found in the XJR-9, a new futuristic design and was the first street-legal car made primarily of carbon fiber.

RM Sotheby’s

Jaguar Sport—a joint venture between the marque and Tom Wilkenshaw Racing—would build just 50 XJR-15s between 1990 and 1992. This particular example, chassis no. 018, was one of the street-legal models. The body—which was designed Peter Stevens, who was also responsible for the McLaren F1—is finished in a rich coat of metallic dark blue, which helps accentuate its elegant lines. The two-person cabin is spartan, but also equipped with two comfortable leather racing seats. Although the car is over 30 years old, it was restored to factory condition in 2015 and looks brand new.
The XJR-15 is as capable as it is good looking. It is powered by a mid-mounted 5.3-liter V-12 almost identical to the one found in the XJR-9. That mill was mighty enough to push the vehicle to a top speed of 215 mph when it was brand new. One quirk about this example—which is known as the “Japan Study Car” because it was used for aerodynamic and other testing—is that it’s equipped with a five-speed transaxle gearbox, instead of the race-tuned, six-speed gearbox found in other examples. It has only 1,000 miles of use, so it should drive pretty well too.

The XJR-15’s interior 

RM Sotheby’s

Interested in adding this historically important supercar to your garage? RM Sotheby’s expects the car to sell for between $1.2 million and $1.4 million when it hits the block on August 20. And considering the condition it’s in, that might just be a bargain.

Click here to see all the photos of the 1991 Jaguar XJR-15.

RM Sotheby’s

Only 5 Mercedes-Benz AMG Hammer Coupes Are Believed to Exist. Now One Is Up for Grabs.

Only 5 Mercedes-Benz AMG Hammer Coupes Are Believed to Exist. Now One Is Up for Grabs.

Back in the days of Miami Vice-era excess, life occasionally imitated art. Consider the case of one enthusiast who tracked down a Mercedes-Benz AMG Hammer Coupe he just had to have. After acquiring the rare-as-hen’s-teeth two-door from Andy Cohen of Beverly Hills Motoring, he embarked on a road trip to Las Vegas and promptly got stopped for speeding—no surprise, given the coupe’s autobahn-burning 6.0-liter V-8. In any other decade, a speeding violation might have been the end of the story. But in the spirit of the sordid ‘80s, illicit substances were discovered during the stop and the man in question ended up behind bars, with the hot rod Hammer getting seized by the DEA. The car was later sold at a government auction to former Major League Baseball player Rob Deer, and traded hands several times before landing in the current seller’s hands.

Untrained eyes might confuse this particular Benz with a run-of-the-mill 300 CE—a fine, but commonplace car that can be readily sourced in the second-hand market. But so-called pre-merger AMG models, and in particular the legendary Hammer iterations, have become a grail car for Mercedes-Benz enthusiasts. AMG, before it was acquired by Mercedes-Benz in 1999 and integrated within the sprawling manufacturer’s portfolio, explored the outer edges of high-performance tuning through handmade engines and suspension components with a fanatical, atelier-style approach to tuning. The assiduous work was revealed when you popped the hood, but these hopped up models were otherwise hard to distinguish externally apart from flashier wheels and subtle bodywork mods. The crowning jewel of AMG’s efforts was the Hammer, which saw approximately 30 examples worldwide, and 13 sedans for the US market. Even rarer were coupe iterations, of which an estimated 5 exist; the only thing rarer is the Hammer wagon, which was built as a 1 of 1 car.

Mercedes-Benz AMG Hammer Coupe 

The MB Market

This is the first time a genuine Hammer has become available in the US through a stateside auction site. “The Hammer Coupe embodies everything we’re trying to do,” says MB Market founder Blakley Leonard, whose online auction house is hosting the sale. “There’s no better pre-merger AMG than an actual Hammer,” he told Robb Report. “This is exactly the type of car we’re most passionate about.”

Mercedes-Benz AMG Hammer Coupe from behind. 

The MB Market

This Hammer wears period correct chromed 17-inch Monoblock wheels and of-the-era tires which will need to be replaced with modern rubber for safety. The coupe rides on AMG-branded springs and shocks, AMG bumpers, skirts, and spoiler, along signature ’80s bits like a Sony stereo with a CD changer, and sheepskin seat covers. With 19,417 clicks on the odometer, the Hammer has plenty of miles ahead for those interested in motoring in ’80s style. But the buyer will need to be prepared to spend a pretty penny on the purchase: With nearly a week left in the auction and current bids at $303,000, these ultra-rare AMGs have proven that desire only grows with age. And one other word of warning: In case of over-enthusiasm with your new purchase on the highway, just be careful what you carry in the trunk.
Check out more photos of the Hammer below.

The MB Market

The MB Market

The MB Market

The MB Market

The MB Market

The MB Market

An Ultra-Rare 1968 Ferrari Daytona Prototype Will Be Auctioned During Monterey Car Week

An Ultra-Rare 1968 Ferrari Daytona Prototype Will Be Auctioned During Monterey Car Week

A prototype of one of Ferrari’s most beloved models is set to go up for grabs next month.

RM Sotheby’s will auction off a stunning pre-production example of the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 during Monterey Car Week. The silver speed demon is one of three prototypes made before the final Scaglietti-built grand tourer made its debut at the Paris Salon in 1968.

As legend has it, Ferrari only built the 365 GTB/4 because its factory wasn’t ready to start production of a planned rear-mounted inline-12 model. Instead, it decided to build one last car with its long-running front-engine “Colombo” short-block V-12. Combine that potent mill with gorgeous coachwork by Pininfarina and you end up with the 365 GTB/4, or Daytona as its better known to collectors and enthusiasts. The car’s nickname—meant to commemorate the marque’s 1-2-3 finish at the 24 Hours of Daytona in 1967—is purely unofficial, but that hasn’t stopped it from sticking around for decades.

1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Prototype by Scaglietti 

RM Sotheby’s

This particular example is the second of three Daytona prototypes built before the car made its debut in October of 1968. Ferrari was still clearly figuring out what it wanted the 365 to be, so its features a chassis (no. 11001) and a numbers matching 3.3-liter four-cam type 226 engine from its predecessor, the 265 GTB/4. It also featured several design elements that wouldn’t make it to production, including a longer nose, oval eggcrate grille and recessed headlamps.
Despite the differences between the prototype and the final production model, the early Daytona is still a beautiful car. It’s finished in the original coat of silver that it left the factory in. Meanwhile, its two-seat cabin is covered in black leather and has a three-spoke, wood-rimmed steering wheel. It also comes with Ferrari Classiche certification and the new owner will get its Red Book once it’s printed by the marque.

Inside the 365 GTB/4 Prototype by Scaglietti 

RM Sotheby’s

The 365 GTB/4 prototype will hit the block as part of RM Sotheby’s multi-day Monterey Car Week sale, which will be held at the California city’s conference center from August 18 to 20. The auction house hasn’t announced a pre-sale estimate for the car, but early examples of the model have regularly sold in excess of $500,000. Just imagine how much one of its prototypes will go for.
Click here to see all the photos of the 1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Prototype by Scaglietti.

RM Sotheby’s

A Rare 1980 BMW M1, the Marque’s Supercar Collab With Lamborghini, Is Up for Auction

A Rare 1980 BMW M1, the Marque’s Supercar Collab With Lamborghini, Is Up for Auction

Now could be your chance to add one of the rarest modern BMWs to your garage.

A gorgeous and excellently preserved M1 is currently up for auction on Bring a Trailer. The coupé, an all-too-rare example of the only supercar the marque has ever built, should be of note to any serious collector, but especially those with a thing for German-made autos.
The M1 was born out of a partnership struck by BMW and Lamborghini to build a race car during the 1970s. The resulting road car featured a glorious wedge design by the legendary Giorgetto Giugiaro and a mid-mounted 3.5-liter DOHC straight-six that could pump out 274 hp. Unfortunately, production difficulties and some bad luck—Lamborghini had to drop out because of financial difficulties—meant the M1 cost a relative fortune for the era ($115,000, which was twice as much as the Ferrari 308) and sold poorly because of that, according to BMW Blog. In 1981, three years after it launched, the German marque pulled the plug on the vehicle, with only around 400 street-legal examples having rolled off the line.

Inside the 1980 BMW M1 

Bring a Trailer

This particular M1, chassis no. 292, was built and sold in 1980. Its exterior is finished in gloss black and its interior in black leather and checked cloth. The color scheme isn’t the only thing that matches. The coupé is also equipped with its original 3.5-liter straight-six, which is mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. Although it’s 42 years old, the car, which was originally sold to an owner in the UK but has since been brought to the US, looks to be in impeccable shape. It has about 30,000 miles on the odometer, which isn’t nothing, but also isn’t all that bad considering its age. It also suggests the car has been semi-regularly driven, which is a good thing.
Of course, because it’s in such good condition, this M1 likely won’t come cheap. With more than nine days left to go in the auction, bidding has already reached $310,000. MotorTrend reports that well-maintained M1s can sell for up to $600,000 today, so we expect that number will climb in the days to come.

Click here to see all the photos of the 1980 BMW M1 supercar.

Bring a Trailer

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