Anna Wintour

André Leon Talley Has Passed Away at 73

André Leon Talley Has Passed Away at 73

André Leon Talley at an event in New York in 2020. Photo: Getty
Fashion icon André Leon Talley has died at the age of 73. According to reports, the fashion writer and former Vogue creative director was in the hospital due to an undisclosed illness.
Upon the news of his demise going public, several noteworthy names from the fashion industry were quick to share heartbreaking reactions of online. Among them was designer Diane von Furstenberg, model Amber Valletta and Coco Rocha.
After years at Vogue, where he became Anna Wintour‘s right hand, André Leon Talley joined the W Magazine family in Paris in 1995. His relationship with Vogue, however, was a special one, and drew him back in 1998 in the position of the magazine’s editor-at-large, which he maintained for the next five years. Over the years, Talley’s eye and understanding of fashion made him a name to follow across the world, and his mark on the industry will remain for generations. Below, a look at some of the messages shared in response to the news of his death.

Everything You Need to Know About Vogue’s Forces of Fashion This Year

Everything You Need to Know About Vogue’s Forces of Fashion This Year

This year, Vogue’s Forces of Fashion event will be a virtual affair, held on July 7 and 8. Titled “Fashion Goes Forward,” the event will feature many notable speakers and panel discussions that you won’t want to miss. (So make sure to book those tickets early!)
Over the course of two days, a number of the fashion industry’s leading designers and icons will sit down for thought-provoking conversations. Highlights include a special panel discussion with Vogue’s Anna Wintour, British Vogue’s Edward Enninful, Vogue China’s Margaret Zhang, and Vogue Runway’s Luke Leitch, who will all offer an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at what goes into making Vogue’s global titles.
Award-winning musician Billie Eilish and Gucci visionary creative director Alessandro Michele will also be in conversation with Vogue’s Chioma Nnadi to discuss how they’ve shaped their respective industries. Designers such as Marc Jacobs, Balenciaga’s Demna Gvasalia, Maison Margiela’s John Galliano, and Chloé’s Gabriela Hearst will all speak as well. Topics in the panels will range from what it takes to build a brand with impeccable authenticity to what goes into making it as a top fashion stylist.
All these panels will be done in English and available to watch live or on demand after the event until July 29. So what are you waiting for? Tickets, which come in several tiers, are available on the Forces of Fashion website now. (The all-access tickets are already sold out, so act fast.) Click here for the full lineup.
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Originally published on Vogue.com

‘The Devil Wears Prada’ Turns 15: A Look Back at the Film’s Iconic Fashion Moments

‘The Devil Wears Prada’ Turns 15: A Look Back at the Film’s Iconic Fashion Moments

Gird your loins, “The Devil Wears Prada” came out 15 years ago today.
It seems like only yesterday viewers gaped at the sight of Andy Sachs walking through the glass office doors of Runway magazine in those head-turning, thigh-high Chanel boots. In spite of its age, the film is still referenced as one of the most celebrated fashion movies in recent history, with outfits many still take inspiration from today.
Adapted from Lauren Weisberger’s novel of the same name, the film depicts a closer look at the ins and outs of working in the supposedly cutthroat fashion industry. The plot follows the story of recent college graduate Andrea “Andy” Sachs (Anne Hathaway) who lands the highly coveted job of being the co-assistant to powerhouse magazine editor Miranda Priestly (Meryl Streep).

Starring alongside Hathaway and Streep were Emily Blunt, Stanley Tucci and Adrian Grenier, who played Priestly’s other co-assistant Emily Charlton, art director Nigel Kipling and Andy’s boyfriend Nate Cooper, respectively.
Weisberger’s bestselling book, released in 2003, was a roman à clef detailing her own personal experience as an assistant to Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour, who was widely believed to be the inspiration for Miranda Priestly.

Meryl Streep poses with the award she won for best actress in a musical or comedy for her work in “The Devil Wears Prada,” at the 64th Annual Golden Globe Awards in 2007. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian) 
AP

Upon its release, the film received numerous accolades, including Golden Globe nominations for Best Picture (Comedy/Musical), Supporting Actress for Blunt and Best Actress (Comedy/Musical) for Streep, which she eventually won. Streep also picked up her 14th Academy Award nomination for Best Actress, while costume designer Patricia Field received a nod for Best Costume Design.

Discussing her thoughts behind dressing Streep as Miranda Priestly, Field told WWD it was “important for [her] to take it to another level” beyond Anna Wintour being the main inspiration.
“It was about creating for the viewing audience what a chief editor is about. And I discussed all that with Meryl and she agreed with me,” Field told WWD for the film’s 10th anniversary in 2016. “And so in choosing her wardrobe my idea was that she’s a chief fashion editor, she has her own style. It’s not some other editor’s style that I’m copying. We’re creating an original character.”
Here, WWD looks at some of the more iconic fashion moments from “The Devil Wears Prada.” Scroll on for more.

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Anna Wintour Joins These A-list Models To Explain Why Fashion Needs To Be Size Inclusive

Anna Wintour Joins These A-list Models To Explain Why Fashion Needs To Be Size Inclusive

Anna Wintour opened Vogue’s annual Forces of Fashion summit with a message of positivity. Describing the recent US election result as “inspiring,” she went on to praise designers who have fearlessly pushed on despite the challenges faced during the ongoing pandemic, reassuring virtual attendees that this is “a moment of change and of hope” – an appropriate prelude to the first discussion of the day: “Whose Positivity?,” moderated by Gabriella Karena-Johnson and featuring models Paloma Elsesser, Precious Lee, Tess McMillan and Jill Kortleve.
Anna Wintour and the “Whose Positivity?” panel during day one of the Vogue Forces of Fashion summit

“We have to acknowledge the fact that there was a time, not long ago, where this entire panel wouldn’t exist,” said Karefa-Johnson, referencing the shifts in the industry over the past decade and increasing diversity now shown on the runway. Recalling her first entry into the world of fashion, Kortleve described a painful two-year period of simply trying to lose weight in order to fit with the zeitgeist, while McMillan found herself pigeon-holed by agencies who wanted to place her in their ‘Curve’ sections – something she described as “very offensive.”
Model Tess McMillan, Vogue Forces of Fashion 2020 summit

Critiquing the vocabulary used to describe models’ bodies, Lee talked of the divisive implications of using such terms as ‘plus-size,’ a categorization she feels is antiquated given the fact that the average size of women in the US is a 14.
“I’m more than capable of creating a beautiful moment in a picture,” she said, as the discussion dug deeper into their thoughts on tokenism. “I think of my work as art,” said McMillan. “I’m not just a body that sells clothes.” Elsesser supported this, referring to a time when she would only be styled in “lingerie and a jacket,” for high fashion editorials because there were no runway samples created to fit her shape.
Describing her appearances on the Alexander McQueen and Fendi runways as “amazing moments,” former Vogue Arabia cover star, Elsesser explained the importance of such castings in relation to the resulting trickle-down effect: samples are created for the runway show and later shot for editorials before ultimately making it into stores.
Left to right: Alva Claire, Precious Lee and Jill Kortleve walk for Versace SS21 / Courtesy of Vogue Runway

Collectively and throughout the discussion, topics linked back to notions of ‘labelling’ and ‘limitation’. These are beautiful women who don’t want to be dictated to by the fashion industry, society, or anyone else for that matter. Describing her experience of walking the Versace SS21 runway as “a win for so many women…an exhale almost,” Lee was grateful that her chosen look – a short, vibrant fitted dress with towering neon green platforms – celebrated (and not covered), her body. “Don’t allow my extra 12 inches to scare you away!” she said, laughing.
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