Accessories

First Look: Shay Mitchell’s Béis to Unveil Pop-up at The Grove in L.A.

First Look: Shay Mitchell’s Béis to Unveil Pop-up at The Grove in L.A.

Béis, the luggage and accessories company created by actress Shay Mitchell, is opening a pop-up store at The Grove shopping center in Los Angeles.The 270-square-foot space, “The Béis Motel,” will be located in The Park across from Nordstrom, open May 25 to June 21.
“As a digitally native brand, in a historically brick-and-mortar category, there is no doubt the benefits of developing touch points with the consumer, both current and new, to interact with our product in person, and to personify the digital relationship and engagement that we have worked so hard to create,” Béis president Adeela Hussain Johnson told WWD.

A rendering of “The Béis Motel” pop-up.
Courtesy of BÉIS

The brand will unveil its limited-edition “Terry Collection” for summer — totes, a backpack cooler and cosmetic clutch in beige, black and lime green — and offer bestsellers in luggage, priced starting at $198 for “The Carry-On Roller,” in bags with the $98 “The Weekender” tote and travel accessories, ranging from an $8 refillable water bottle to a $78 packable poncho.

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According to the brand, their top 20 core items represent 70 percent of their annual revenue. Last year, Béis sales were up 300 percent when compared to 2020, and 2022 is expected to drive about 200 percent growth.
“We are so excited to bring our brand to life and showcase our products front and center in a very Béis way,” continued Johnson. “The space is so creative, fun, cheeky and chic, all things our consumers have come to love, trust and expect of us.”
There will also be activations on-site, including happy hours with nonalcoholic slushies and Onda tequila seltzer on June 1, 11 and 18, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. All transactions will include a “Béis Motel” key chain, and shoppers with purchases of more than $150 will receive a special tote.
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Walmart Earnings Fall Short Thanks to Rising Gas and Food Prices

Walmart Earnings Fall Short Thanks to Rising Gas and Food Prices

Walmart is proving that even the nation’s largest retailer may not be immune to the economic pressures that are causing consumers to reevaluate their spending habits. 

Rising food prices meant more shoppers flocked to Walmart in the most recent quarter in search of grocery deals.
Courtesy Photo

The Bentonville, Ark.-based firm revealed quarterly earnings Tuesday before the market opened, improving on top-line revenues, but failing to meet Wall Street’s expectations after falling short on bottom-line profits. Company shares fell nearly 9 percent at the start of Tuesday’s trading session. 
“Bottom-line results were unexpected and reflected the unusual environment,” Doug McMillon, president and chief executive officer of Walmart, said in a statement. “U.S. inflation levels, particularly in food and fuel, created more pressure on the margin mix and operating costs than we expected. We’re adjusting and will balance the needs of our customers for value with the need to deliver profit growth for our future.”  

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For the most recent quarter, or the three-month period ending April 30, total revenues grew 2.4 percent to about $141 billion, up from more than $138 billion a year ago. Comp sales at Sam’s Club grew 10.2 percent, and 17.4 percent on a two-year stack. Membership income rose 10.5 percent. 
Walmart U.S. e-commerce sales increased 1 percent, or 38 percent on a two-year stack. Last August, McMillon said the company’s global e-commerce business was on track to reach $75 billion in revenues by the end of the year. The company still hasn’t said whether it has reached that goal yet.
Meanwhile, ​​net sales at Walmart International fell $3.5 billion during the most recent quarter, or 13 percent to $23.8 billion, negatively impacted by $5 billion, due to divestitures. The retailer logged $2.05 billion, down from $2.73 billion during last year’s first quarter, as a result. 
The results are a mixed bag. Walmart’s affordably priced food selection means consumers are increasingly flocking to the mass channel for their grocery needs. But McMillon added on Tuesday morning’s conference call with analysts that inflation is also lifting the average ticket price. Shoppers are responding by purchasing fewer discretionary items, resulting in smaller overall basket sizes. 
“As expected, consumers are increasingly drawn to the lower price points that Walmart can offer for groceries and Walmart is taking market share in food, but higher food sales is also putting pressure on gross margin,” Moody’s retail analyst Mickey Chadha wrote in a note. He added that the higher inventory levels “could lead to increased promotional cadence in the coming quarters if consumers continue to pull back, which could increase pressure on earnings. It is increasingly difficult to pass on higher prices to consumers while dealing with higher wages and employee costs.”
In terms of food costs, McMillon said there’s been double-digit inflation. “And I’m concerned that inflation may continue to increase. As it relates to Walmart U.S. general merchandise sales, we knew that we were up against stimulus dollars from last year, but the rate of inflation in food pulled more dollars away from [general merchandise] than we expected as customers needed to pay for the inflation in food,” he said.

Aside from rising consumer food and gasoline prices, executives on the call told analysts that additional headwinds came from higher-than-expected inventory levels (up 32 percent for the quarter, year-over-year), added fuel costs in the supply chain and increased labor expenses. 
“As the Omicron variant case count declined rapidly in the first half of the quarter, more of our associates [who] were out on COVID-19 leave came back to work faster than we expected,” McMillon said. “We hired more associates at the end of last year to cover for those on leave. So we ended up with weeks of overstaffing. That issue was resolved during the quarter, primarily through attrition.”
In addition, U.S. fuel cost the retailer more than $160 million more during the quarter than originally expected.

Doug McMillon, president and chief executive officer of Walmart
Courtesy Photo

Still, McMillon expressed optimism for the future. 
“Across our businesses, we had a strong top-line quarter,” he said. “There were some things that happened during the quarter that were different than we expected and we’re trying to be very transparent about those things. There seems to be more uncertainty now in a very fluid environment. And so, we’ll just deal with that.”
One way will be by slashing prices in high-margin areas, such as apparel, in an effort to manage excess inventory. While this might seem counterintuitive, McMillon said shoppers on a budget are more likely to notice. 
“Part of what’s at play here is [that] you’ve got food inflation moving up, but we’ve got general merchandise categories, like apparel and some of our hardlines categories, to play with,” he said. “And the beauty of it is [that] customers are even more price sensitive right now. They’re attention to fuel prices and high-food prices is high. And so when you bring [a price of] something down in sporting goods or hardware, one of these other categories, they notice even more than they would notice before and that makes the elasticity impact be different than it would be otherwise, which blends the mix up.” 
In addition, some tailwinds for the quarter included things like game consoles, as well as patio furniture, grills and gardening supplies, thanks to warming temperatures.

“In terms of the consumer themselves, we’ve seen strong growth with higher-income consumers, middle-income and lower-income, but we do see a definite strength with high-ticket items,” John Furner, president and CEO of Walmart U.S., said on the call. “With some consumers and others, we do see some switching, which would include switching specifically from brands to private brands. And where we see the switching from brands to private brands, we’ll continue to watch that for a group of customers, but we’ve got to all work harder to keep prices low for the American consumer.”
McMillon added: “It’s important to recognize that there’s more than one consumer. We serve the whole country. [With] the U.S. in particular, we’ve got a breadth of customers and they behave differently. [With] some customers, we are seeing some indications of change throughout the quarter, but that’s not true for all of them.”

Pieces from Walmart’s Love & Sports brand.
Courtesy Photo

Walmart has worked hard over the last few years to expand its assortment of merchandise, particularly in fashion. The big-box retailer now sells more than 1,000 third-party apparel, accessories, and beauty and wellness brands — such as Levi’s, Reebok, Free People, Jordache, Eloquii, Space NK and Kris Jenner’s home cleaning brand Safely — and continues to add to the scale and breadth of its portfolio of brands each quarter. Earlier this month, the firm expanded its distribution of period-panty brand Proof to approximately 4,000 Walmart stores.
In addition, Walmart has an extensive list of its own apparel brands, three of which are worth more than $2 billion, although the company declined to say which ones. The list includes sustainable innerwear and maternity brand Kindly, swimwear and activewear brand Love & Sports, and apparel brands Free Assembly and Scoop, of which luxury designer Brandon Maxwell serves as creative director.
“Maintaining price competitiveness is the key risk for Walmart in today’s inflationary environment,” Landon Luxembourg, senior analyst at research firm Third Bridge, wrote in a note. “As consumer wallets come under pressure, private brands will likely take the stage as consumers trade down from a pure decision of opting for lower-cost items. Walmart’s private brand portfolio, which was a focus area over the last four to five years, has now doubled its assortment. However, it has not grown consumer mind share and lack recognizability versus Target and Costco’s competing private assortment, which may be more sought after by consumers.”

Walmart anticipates current quarter revenues will increase more than 5 percent, excluding divestitures. U.S. comp sales are also expected to grow — between 4 percent and 5 percent — excluding fuel, while earnings per share are expected to be flat to up slightly, excluding divestitures.  
For the full year, the company expects net revenues will rise about 4 percent, excluding divestitures. Walmart U.S. comp sales are expected to increase roughly 3.5 percent, excluding fuel, while earnings per share for the year will decrease about 1 percent, excluding divestitures.
The company ended the quarter with $11.8 million in cash and cash equivalents and more than $32 million in long-term debt. 
Shares of Walmart, which closed up 0.11 percent Monday to $148.21, are up 6.7 percent, year-over-year.
“We don’t expect this miss to become a norm, seeing that Walmart has historically outperformed competition during tough economic times,” Arun Sundaram, senior equity analyst at CFRA Research, wrote in a note. His firm maintained its “buy” position on Walmart’s stock, but cut the 12-year price target by $3 to $162 a share. “The good news is most of these issues seem to be isolated to the quarter and margins should improve in the second quarter and the back half of the year as Walmart works through excess inventory and better matches pricing with costs.”

Fashion and Art Meet for Luxury Swimwear Collaboration

Fashion and Art Meet for Luxury Swimwear Collaboration

French luxury swimwear brand Vilebrequin and contemporary art Swiss publishing house JRP Editions are pooling their resources for a museum-ready swimwear collection. 

Pieces from the Vilebrequin x JRP Editions collection by artist Kenny Scharf.
Courtesy Photo

“Bringing art to the beach has always been the dream,” said Roland Herlory, chief executive officer of Vilebrequin, which is part of the G-III Apparel Group. “This long-term collaboration with JRP Editions will push our artistry to new places over the coming seasons.”
That includes the original Saint-Tropez trunk, men’s and women’s swimsuits, tops and accessories, like bags, hats, beach towels and even custom-print ping-pong sets. There are 25 pieces in total, that come in various hues such as purple hot rod flames, rainbow-color happy faces, sea turtles, graffiti-like splashes of paint and shades of sky blue, while exploring such themes and topics as elitism, feminism, fetishized luxury, randomness, gender-identity and artists of color.  

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Pieces from the Vilebrequin x JRP Editions collection by artist John Armleder.
Courtesy Photo

“Our swimsuit fabrics are an entirely new terrain for artists,” Herlory explained. “We do not consider what we do art; we’re more focused on reproducing artists’ work as closely as possible to the original in the most honest and respectful manner. With the know-how of Vilebrequin studio and ateliers, we are capable of delivering printing techniques that reproduce an original artwork’s unique color and contrast as faithfully as possible.” 
John Armleder, one of the artists featured in the collaboration, added: “There is no essential difference between a painting, a print or a swimsuit. What changes fundamentally here is the context and the distribution modes of the object. The forms and compositions can thus migrate freely from one support to the other.”

Pieces from the Vilebrequin x JRP Editions collection by artist John Armleder.
Courtesy Photo

Additional artists include Kenny Scharf, Sylvie Fleury, and Racquel Chevremont and Mickalene Thomas, also known professionally as “Deux Femmes Noires.” The collaboration was curated in partnership with JRP Editions founder Lionel Bovier, who also serves as director of MAMCO, a contemporary art museum in Geneva, and Arnaud Hubert, chief executive officer of JRP Editions. 
“We wanted to curate a collection that would allow us to explore as many voices and designs as possible,” Bovier said. “This meant bringing together artists with radically different approaches, but who share an interest in how their work can migrate from the canvas or walls to textile. They are united by a common thread: the power of their work, the clarity of their artistic language and the integrity with which Vilebrequin handled their projects.”

Pieces from the Vilebrequin x JRP Editions collection by artist Kenny Scharf.
Courtesy Photo

The limited-edition collection launched May 3, just in time for warm weather and summer travels, on vilebrequin.com and JRP-editions.com, as well as select global Vilebrequin stores. The collection, though now out as the world reopens, was actually conceptualized during the pandemic when people were still just dreaming of far-flung getaways. A second drop, the “Faces in Places” print by artist Kenny Scharf will come out June 21, followed by a second capsule later this year and a third in early 2023. Sizes range from XS to 3XL in men’s and XS to XL in women’s, with prices ranging from $105 to $315.

Vilebrequin was founded by Fred Prysquel in Saint-Tropez in 1971 as a men’s swimwear business. In 2012, G-lll Apparel Group purchased the brand. The following year, women’s swimwear was added to the mix.

Lindberg’s Light-As-Air, Minimalistic Eyewear Is the Only Accessory You Need This Summer

Lindberg’s Light-As-Air, Minimalistic Eyewear Is the Only Accessory You Need This Summer

Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Greg Adamski at MMG
Lindberg pushes the boundaries of luxury eyewear through its meticulous craftsmanship, which reflects in each of the brand’s designs. With tireless attention to detail and diligent engineering, the accessories label uses long-lasting and refined materials such as titanium, gold, buffalo horn, fine wood, and diamonds to create its must-haves.
Inclusivity and design go hand-in-hand with Lindberg’s identity, and through an extensive modular system, one has the chance to customize every aspect of the eyewear to their taste. Encouraging an exploration of personal style, Lindberg caters to all with researched eyewear specialists who offer handcrafted and dynamic customizations, and endless unique combinations.
True to the brand’s heritage, the Danish eyewear brand proudly boasts its lightweight feel and casual aesthetic, spotlighting the beauty of minimalism and simplicity. The Strip3p collection, in particular, is a refreshing rework of Lindberg’s colored lenses and bold temples. To take contemporary style to a whole new level, Lindberg’s rimless frames create a look that is set to stand out, stripping glasses of all unnecessary elements.
Vogue Arabia, April 2022. Photo: Greg Adamski at MMG
For the eyewear connoisseur, another collection worth checking out is the Lindberg Thintanium 5520, which has stretched the limits of the metal with a set of ultra-thin titanium eyewear that’s as sturdy as it is lightweight. Achieved with the help of the latest and most innovative technology, these pieces are the new gold standard for the future of eyewear, encompassing modern structures with octagon fronts that blend in seamlessly with one’s face structure.
While minimalism reigns in the world of Lindberg, the brand’s expertise is anything but. Lindberg’s ethos is rooted in an uncompromising dedication to quality and attention to detail, offering a daring display of delicacy and lightness. What else does one need come summer?
Photography: Greg Adamski at MMGStyle: Zane PageHair and Makeup: Gianluca Casu at MMGProduction: Rama NaserModel: Carolina Perlingeiro at Signature ElementsProduction Assistant: Shahenda Al Sayed

Furla CEO Exits Accessories Company

Furla CEO Exits Accessories Company

MILAN — Furla on Thursday reported a 7.6 percent increase in sales in 2021 compared with 2020, while also revealing that its chief executive officer Mauro Sabatini is exiting the Italian accessories company.
Until the arrival of a new CEO, chief operating officer Devis Bassetto will lead Furla.
Sabatini, who in January last year succeeded Alberto Camerlengo, had also been named executive president of the board. Sabatini has deep knowledge of Furla and the leather goods industry. For more than 18 years he was CEO of Effeuno, a leather goods manufacturing company he founded in Tuscany and Furla’s supplier and longtime partner.
In 2018, Furla took control of Effeuno, which is based in Tavarnelle Val di Pesa, a 40-minute drive from Florence. At the time, Effeuno already exclusively produced Furla’s accessories, employing more than 100 workers and producing 2 million bags and small leather goods a year. The takeover was part of Furla’s strategy to invest in Italy and to strengthen the group’s supply chain, boosting production.

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The company did not provide a sales figure for 2021 at presstime, but said they were achieved despite the restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan, the main single market for the company. Furla group sales in 2020 totaled 290.8 million euros and in 2019 were 502 million euros. Last year, Sabatini admitted Furla recorded a double-digit decrease in 2020 due to the impact of the pandemic, characterized 2021 as a year of transition, setting the foundations for a recovery in 2022 or 2023.
As reported, Fulra owners are considering a sale of a stake in the Italian accessories company, according to market sources.
Sources say Furla has tapped Lazard as its adviser and a dossier is circulating in Milan. It is also understood that former Valentino CEO Stefano Sassi is consulting with Furla on a potential deal.
In 2016, owner Giovanna Furlanetto set in motion plans to take Furla public, but this project never materialized. Furla was founded in Bologna in 1927 by Aldo Furlanetto, Giovanna’s father.

Italian Jewelry Brand Acchitto Expands Into Eyewear and Accessories

Italian Jewelry Brand Acchitto Expands Into Eyewear and Accessories

MILAN — In the game of billiards, the first move is called “acchitto” in Italian — and it takes a dose of courage, preparation and even luck to execute.This is how the two Italian founders, Francesca Richiardi and Elena Faccio of the jewelry brand Acchitto felt when they decided to give life to their project. In an interview with WWD, Richiardi mentioned that, “Initially we were unaware of what we were doing, Elena and I didn’t have an extensive knowledge of jewelry so we learned day by day.” Faccio agreed and added that, “We had the courage to throw ourselves into it.”

Francesca Richiardi and Elena Faccio, founders and designers of the brand Acchitto.
Courtesy image

The designers met while working at the Fendi style offices and in March 2018 the jewelry brand Acchitto was born.

“We both had a great passion for jewelry and in particular for vintage, during that moment we noticed that the jewelry market was going in two specific directions: one which was very bold and on the opposite side, minimal designs,” said Faccio. “There was something in between that was actually missing.”

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Richiardi and Faccio wanted to create a jewelry piece that could be recognizable and most importantly that would stand out, while also remaining elegant and wearable. This is why their first design was the “Il Moro Ring” (which costs from 130 to 160 euros depending on the model.) Richiardi explained that they “took inspiration from the Sicilian and Venetian moors but we completely distorted and reinterpreted them.”

“Il Moro Ring” by Acchitto.
Courtesy image

After only four years, Acchitto has already gained recognition with celebrities both Italian and international. Recently, Adele chose to wear the ‘Aequor hoops earring’ for the cover of her Spotify album. Miley Cyrus decided to rock the brand’s colorful rings, and “Euphoria” star Sydney Sweeney wore the “Aequor onde earrings” in pink. Acchitto was also spotted at the finale of “RuPaul’s Drag Race U.S.”
“In 2021 Acchitto has grown exponentially, more than we could have ever estimated and expected, it is crazy to see so many world-known stars wearing our creations. We are always pleased to see how they wear it, what they feel when wearing it, also because each piece is designed to be worn differently,” continued Faccio.
Indeed, thanks to a special mechanism that has been patented by Richiardi and Faccio, the rings can be customized according to the customer’s request — making them unique and to be kept and collected over time. Faccio explained that, “The rings can be screwed and unscrewed back, in this way the client can choose even two different ‘heads’ with one base. It took us almost one year to finally come up with the perfect mechanism.”
Right now, Faccio and Richiardi are expanding their collection with accessories through the recent launch of a collection of sunglasses and belts for the summer 2022 season.
The sunglasses are made in four different acetates: black, tortoiseshell brown, purple and pearly white, with gradient lenses and with the shimmering A logo which is colored according to the model in gold, fuchsia or green and retail at 190 euros on Acchitto’s official website. Besides Acchitto’s website, the brand can also be bought on Yoox and at Gente Roma’s physical store in Rome.

The Acchitto series one sunglasses in white.
Courtesy image

“We realized that seasonality does not work with jewelry, waiting six months for a product also tends to penalize the customer’s request,” observed Faccio. “By launching smaller collections or capsules throughout the year, on one hand, it helps us a lot on a creative level and on the other hand, it brings us closer to the customer.”

This is why the two young designers plan to amplify even more the brand by creating shoes, bags and clothing collections, even through collaborations with other fashion labels.
“We want to grow and create an ‘acchittable look’ and not just jewelry, of course we always want to maintain this connection between us and our final customer, which makes Acchitto so desired,” Richiardi concluded.

Wearable Objet d’Arts Inspired by Amazigh Heritage

Wearable Objet d’Arts Inspired by Amazigh Heritage

At the Lanserring Gallery in Manhattan’s SoHo, Katia Luna Benai reached into a tall wood and glass vitrine to show a polyhedral crocodile handbag with solid silver hardware, priced $30,000.For whomever might own it, “It represents your interest in art. Your interest in culture. Your interest in history,” Benai tells a guest at the gallery.
The bag, named “Nyx” after the Greek Goddess of Chaos, is handmade from 33 pieces requiring 38 hours to assemble, and is part of the debut “Artifacts” collection from the London-based Luna Benai firm, which designs limited-edition wearable objets d’art reflecting the culture of the ancient Amazigh race of Northern Africa.
Benai, the founder and creative director of Luna Benai, as a very young child was raised by her grandmother with the help of six aunts in a traditional Amazigh household in Algeria. She received old and new Amazigh teachings that define her character and design passion. She also traveled much through Africa and East Asia due to her father’s diplomatic profession, ultimately settling at her birth city of London.

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At Luna Benai, “The goal is to create unique timeless pieces that are a fusion of fine art, ancient history and contemporary craftsmanship for the luxury market.”

Luna Benai’s crocodile and solid silver $30,000 Nyx bag, inspired by the Amazigh culture.

For the launch in the U.S., Benai has brought two distinct exotic leather handbags that double as sculptures when presented in their accompanying sculptural cases. “My designs are inspired by the Amazigh heritage. I’m also very much into sculpture,” said Benai, a graduate of the Royal College of Arts in London who formerly worked for VIP services at Harrods.
“These are heritage pieces that embody history as well as a contemporary look for today. The Amazigh race dates back 4,000 years. There is a very, very long history, in terms of heritage, tradition, handmade crafts and shape, that gets passed on from generation to generation.”

Katia Luna Benai

The handbags will reside for six months at Lanserring, which is also London-based and known for designing high-end, bespoke kitchen furniture, dressing rooms and lifestyle products. They are also being shown at the Maison Gerard at the Winter Show being held inside the former Barneys New York flagship on 61st Street and Madison Avenue through April 10.
Benai will design a custom piece for Sotheby’s in the fall when the auction house launches a new category of artists’ jewelry, curated by Tiffany Dubin, called “Art as Jewelry…Jewelry as Art.”
Luna Benai’s wearable objets d’art are made to order and can be custom-made by the company’s team of designers and artisans.
Benai said the crocodile skin for the bags is ethically sourced from the same suppliers utilized by LVMH and Kering, and regulated by CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, which protects endangered plants and animals.
“If you are in the business of crocodile designs, you really need to educate yourself,” Benai said. “I’ve flown to see the crocodile farms and have spent a long time researching this to launch my company.” The solid silver adorning the handbags originates from Grant Macdonald, silversmith to the Royal Family of England.

“Luna Benai is wearable art, for people that fine art and want something different that inspires and imparts knowledge,” said Benai. “It’s not a practicality. It’s more of a statement. It’s definitely a niche clientele.”

Italian Emerging Brand Abse-èl Beefs Up Distribution, Beauty Offering

Italian Emerging Brand Abse-èl Beefs Up Distribution, Beauty Offering

MILAN — Italian emerging brand Abse-èl is marking its sophomore year with ambitious plans, including an expansion of both distribution and offering.The brainchild of Italian creatives Davide Mattiucci, Giuseppe Di Bartolomeo and Ludovica Barlafante, the label has garnered attention for its fresh mix of ready-to-wear, accessories and beauty products — a powerful trifecta that mirrors the professional experiences of each of its founders.
Mattiucci is a fashion designer who worked for 12 years at Blumarine; Di Bartolomeo has extensive experience in accessories design, and Barlafante is a well-known makeup artist.
The trio decided to join forces to launch a contemporary brand that instead of focusing on a progressive brand extension, could immediately express a uniform message of femininity — the name of the brand is a play on the words “absolute” and “elle” — through their individual skills.

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Debuted last year with the spring 2022 collection, the label is distributed by Milan-based showroom Studio Zeta, which is helping the brand to boost its international footprint.

A look from the Abse-èl spring 2022 collection.
Courtesy of Abse-èl

Already available at retailers in Milan, Naples, Venice, Capri, Moscow and Ibiza — where the company is also eyeing the opening of a pop-up store for the summer season — with the fall 2022 collection the indie brand doubled its doors to reach 20 retailers — including new ones in Russia despite the ongoing war in Ukraine.
But, given the conflict with Ukraine, the company is now focusing on Asia, where the label is resonating with consumers, especially with Chinese buyers. To further build on this interest, the company plans a sales campaign in Shanghai, with the goal to enter the market with the fall collection and consolidate its presence with the spring 2023 season.
“Our product is very much in tune with the Asian market not only for its shapes, but the element that is getting most of the positive feedback is the strength of the colors in our collections,” Mattiucci said.
Through a key focus on knitted pieces that guarantee body-con silhouettes, enhanced by cropped lengths and cutouts, the apparel range embraces a palette spanning from white and black to vibrant tones of fuchsia, lime, turquoise and yellow. Accessories add to the chromatic sensibility through geometric handbags and belt bags in metallic and mirrored effects.

The Abse-èl fall 2022 collection.
Courtesy of Abse-èl

The label’s graphic, minimal logo intertwining two Ls to create a rectangular shape further contributes to the colorful vibe, as it is often introduced in contrasting tones.
The logo also appears as a metal buckle on bags and on the silver packaging of the beauty range, which for the moment includes only lipsticks in three shades.
Distribution of all three categories has been the same, but Mattiucci said the company plans to tweak that strategy to enable the beauty part to expand in perfumeries as well as in other markets. For instance, he noticed that this category is driving consumer interest in the Middle East.

The Abse-èl lipstics.
Courtesy of Abse-èl

In sync with this vision, the brand is working to significantly beef up the cosmetics collection with other makeup products and a fragrance, with the ultimate goal of better competing in perfumeries and enhancing its presence on store shelves.

“The idea is to be ready with the full range for Christmas and the holiday season,” Mattiucci said.
Meanwhile, Abse-èl is to launch its online store at the end of the month, which will showcase all product categories. While lipsticks retail at 30 euros, the brand’s rtw is priced between 300 euros and 690 euros. As for accessories, the average price for bags ranges from 480 euros to 550 euros, while footwear retails for 350 euros to 700 euros for next season’s over-the-knee boots.

A look from the Abse-èl fall 2022 collection.
Courtesy of Abse-èl

Alicia Keys Thanks the Saudi Craftswomen Who Gifted Her a Personalized Bag Strap

Alicia Keys Thanks the Saudi Craftswomen Who Gifted Her a Personalized Bag Strap

Photo: Instagram.com/aliciakeys
A known advocate for women’s rights, Alicia Keys‘ humanitarian work was recently recognized by a Saudi-based non-profit enterprise during her trip to the Kingdom. After her performance at AlUla, the organization named Namat gifted the musician with a beautiful bag strap created with the aim of encapsulating everything she stands for.
Photo: Courtesy of Namat
Inspired by her hit song ‘This Girl is on Fire’, the bag strap was presented to Keys at the Women to Women event at AlUla’s Town Hall. The women that work with embroidery and design at Namat interpreted the song in their own words and chose the paragraphs and sentences that resonated most with them. The words of the song reflect and represent the aim of the company’s project through the employment of women and focus on their empowerment, which Keys was very appreciative of.

Soon after, the singer took to Instagram to personally thank the women who created her bag strap. “To the ladies who designed this beautiful piece for me from Namat, I just wanted you to know I got it and it is so stunning,” she said. “And literally the translation, the words, the energy, you captured it. You captured the meaning. You are the meaning which is why you captured it. You mean so much to me and I just wanted to tell you that I adore this and this is a very special gift to me and thank you for blessing the world.”
Read Next: Desert X AlUla is Back: Everything to Know About the Art Exhibition’s Second Edition

21 Heart-Shaped Jewelry Picks for Valentine’s Day That Are Anything but Cliché

21 Heart-Shaped Jewelry Picks for Valentine’s Day That Are Anything but Cliché

Photo: Instagram.com/katyperry
Although heart-themed gifts are usually deemed cheesy for Valentine’s Day, we prefer to think of the motif as classic – especially when it comes to the carefully curated selection of jewelry below.
The best heart-shaped jewelry not only shows that you wear your heart on your sleeve this February 14, but the right piece will work all year round, too.
Drop a hint to your other half: you could command attention in the Van Robot pendants or with the Brooke Gregson crimson ring.  There’s even something for the minimalist with the Jennifer Meyer necklace, that would make an ideal addition to your everyday jewelry.
Shop Vogue’s edit of the best heart-shaped jewelry now.
Alison Lou
Brooke Gregson
Chopard
Dior
Emily P. Wheeler
Gucci
Ileana Makri
Jennifer Meyer
Locquet
Missoma
Pandora
Seb Brown
Selim Mouzannar
Shay
Stone and Strand
Sydney Evan
Tiffany & Co
Van Cleef & Arpels
Van Robot
Wilhelmina Garcia
Yvonne Léon
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

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