Jenni Kayne and Malia Mills Are Courting Shoppers in the Hamptons

Jenni Kayne and Malia Mills Are Courting Shoppers in the Hamptons

With the Hamptons overridden with summer residents, day trippers and city escapees, the number of brands looking to entice shoppers there is increasing.
Jenni Kayne is opening a permanent store and design showroom in Amangansett at 10 Amagansett Square Drive on July 28. Located near Ulla Johnson and Henry Lehr, the shop is offering the brand’s full furniture collection as well as apparel and accessories. Shoppers in the 1,500-square-foot store can check out the brand’s first design bar and meet Kayne’s team of interiors designers, on staff to offer inspiration projects, review swatches and wood samples, assist with ordering furniture and more.
Activations and special events are in the works for a limited time, including complimentary yoga on the lawn with Mandala Yoga Amagansett and complimentary hand-stitching monogramming and embroidery from Rachel Hearn.

So far, bestsellers include the Fisherman Sweater, a relaxed look offered in cotton and cashmere that retails from $295 to $395, according to a company spokeswoman. Mules in suede or shearling that retail between $395 and $425 have also been of interest.
Meanwhile, swimwear designer Malia Mills has teamed up with the Little Red Planet’s Mindi Smith to open a pop-up in the latter’s permanent store in Sag Harbor. There is also a creative space for artists and designers. Mills’ pop-up there will stay open through the end of September. Instead of paving different routes, there are benefits to working together with people that share your ethos, work ethic and quality, Mills said.

Shoppers will find swimwear, clothing, accessories and other items for a range of ages. Mills started her swimwear line more than 25 years ago in New York City. The Little Red Planet specializes in sustainable children’s wear from 30 international designers.
Mills and Smith decided to team up after Mills closed two stores in the Hamptons and Smith relocated hers last year. The Little Red Planet outpost is located at 34 Long Island Avenue. “It’s awesome the ultimate summer share. We’re sharing our house. We’re sharing her store,” said Mills.
Having had a Hamptons location for 12 years, the company has a loyal following there, Mills said. Shoppers are now more inclined to shop online and in-person, and they are price-conscious, the designer said. “Our customer is very supportive of us. They have been shopping with us throughout the pandemic. Obviously, that’s something that we’re grateful for,” she said.
A popular item is the $125 zero-waste Course of Trade “Chi It Forward” bag that is sewn by women who have been victims of sexual violence, been incarcerated or are struggling to be financially independent. Mills’ production director Libby Mattern created this industrial learn-to-sew program, which also includes resume writing and other essential trainings, a few years ago.

This 1-of-25 Mercedes-Benz AMG CLK GTR Could Fetch $10 Million at Auction

This 1-of-25 Mercedes-Benz AMG CLK GTR Could Fetch $10 Million at Auction

One of the most impressive supercars to have come out of the ‘90s is heading to auction.

The rarity in question is a 1998 Mercedes-Benz AMG CLK GTR Strassenversion. While its name is quite the mouthful, this high-octane beast represents the pinnacle of German auto engineering and has quite the backstory.
The sleek two-door is actually a riff on the automaker’s formidable CLK GTR racecar, which dominated the FIA GT championships in 1997 and ’98. The Strassenversion or “street version” was limited to just 25 and is especially sought-after among collectors.

This particular model, which will go under the gavel during Gooding & Company’s Pebble Beach Auction, was the ninth model to roll of the line and is presented in pristine condition.

The Benz still sports a retro dash with analog gauges. 

Gooding & Company

Under the hood, the car sports a naturally-aspirated 6.9-liter V-12 mated to a paddle-shifted 6-speed Xtrac sequential transaxle and can churn out 604 hp and 572 ft lbs of torque. The road rocket has a top speed of 214 mph and can soar from a standstill to 62 mph in just 3.8 seconds. The car has the same wishbone suspension as its track twin but includes softer springs and dampers plus a higher ride height to make it more conducive to the streets.
The 23-year-old ride has changed hands only a few times and has just 896 miles on the dial. It also retains all its original finishes, including a retro dash with analog gauges. As such, it’s likely to fetch a pretty penny. Gooding & Company expects the car to hammer for between $8.5 million and $10 million at the upcoming sale, which is running August 13-14.
This four-wheeler is no stranger to eye-popping sums. When it was released in ‘97, it broke the record for the most expensive production car ever made thanks to its $1.5 million price tag.
The auction house says the seminal Benz comes to auction at a time when enthusiasm for homologation specials could not be stronger. Surely, that’s reason enough to put a bid in.
Check out more photos below:

Gooding & Company

Gooding & Company

Gooding & Company

Gooding & Company

Gooding & Company

Gooding & Company

This Holy-Grail Bra for Big Busts Is Available For 35 Percent Off Right Now

This Holy-Grail Bra for Big Busts Is Available For 35 Percent Off Right Now

Editor’s Note: We’ve updated this story to reflect that the rose gold version of this all-star bra is currently on markdown for 35% off during the Nordstrom Anniversary Sale, with sizes 32HH to 42HH still available.As someone with a 34I bra size, who was mistakenly walking around with a size 38DD bra for a good chunk of her life, I can definitively say that finding a well-fitting bra is a must. One of my absolute pet peeves with bras that aren’t fitted properly or simply aren’t designed with larger busts in mind, is when the cups literally runneth over.But in my search for a bra that would help my set of twins live their best (and most elevated) lives, I was fortunate enough to come across the Matilda Underwire Plunge Bra by Elomi. Elomi is a U.K.-based brand that definitively gets it: Its bras are designed with large busts and curvier body types in mind (many of their bra options start at 34DD and extend to size 48H), which is why this full-figure bra fits me like a glove. I never thought I’d say that I had a holy-grail favorite bra, but after wearing this one my boobs officially have a comfortable place to call home—for eight hours a day, at least.Since the brand is based in the U.K., it might be a little trickier to find the equivalent American size for you. Fortunately, I had in-person assistance from an Elomi fitting expert, but if you’re unsure, Elomi has a handy sizing chart on its website that helps U.S. shoppers find their coordinating sizes. Although technically a 34G would typically be my U.K. size equivalent, I was told that a 34GG actually fit best (so you may want to size up).Here are some initial thoughts after owning this bra for six months: The bra is made with an underwire that feels supportive, but not restrictively so. There’s no prodding or poking around my rib cage, and I can wear it all day long without wanting to rip it off for something more comfortable once I get home. Unlike other bras that squeeze or dig, I always feel confident while wearing this one with fitted tops and sweaters, particularly since I know I’ll be sitting at attention instead of unintentionally drooping (which is the absolute worst). The bra is also designed with a J-hook option—like my favorite sports bras—that allows me to switch up its fit according to my outfit needs (during the summer, this feature really comes in handy when I wear racer-back tops), or when I want extra security.Experts usually recommend hand-washing bras to help them maintain their original shape, but I’ve found that the Matilda is durable enough for me to throw it in the washing machine, on a delicate cycle setting, without having to worry about it not fitting the same way. I’ve washed it probably 10 times at this point, and never run into any issues with stretching or shrinking. I love it so much that I went ahead and ordered it in almost every color available—I own three at this point—and have been able to kiss the dreaded double-boob issues of the past goodbye.I’m not suggesting that this is the only bra I’ll ever wear for the rest of my life, amen, but I am saying it’s giving a lot of others a run for their money. A word of caution to friends and family members: Don’t be surprised if you see the Matilda bra on my birthday list this year—I’m still missing one in the nude color, “Cafe.”Elomi Matilda Underwire Plunge BraThis full cup bra features an underwire, embroidered trim detailing, and an optional J-hook closure for maximum support when you need it most.

3 Experts on What Unvaccinated Kids Can—And Can't—Do Safely These Days

3 Experts on What Unvaccinated Kids Can—And Can't—Do Safely These Days

T.M.: Any child with cold or flu symptoms should not be participating, period. With that assumption, I would say that outdoor sports and activities don’t pose a huge risk, but that masking should be maintained if exertion levels permit. As with everything else, nothing is zero risk. Is it safe for my kids to participate in indoor sports or activities, like basketball or indoor swimming? What can they do to stay safe?T.S.: I would look at local levels of spread and the size and ventilation of indoor locations. A very large location with good airflow, like a gymnasium with fans and open doors and a small number of people, would be less risky than a small workout room with minimal ventilation and lots of people. Masks are still recommended if indoors. T.M.: For indoor sports and activities, I would recommend masking as much as possible, recognizing that some activities like swimming are impractical. Where masking isn’t feasible, distancing is helpful. For sports like basketball which cannot be done without close contact, the team culture will probably dictate the risk, but things like masking while on the bench can help.Like school, summer camps are filled with mostly unvaccinated kids, but many activities are outdoors. Is there any way my kids can safely go to summer camp?S.O.: Yes, as long as they wear a mask indoors. It’s always a good idea to encourage outside activities anyway in these situations.T.S.: An outdoor day camp would be less risky than an extended overnight camp, with large groups of kids from different areas crowded into bunks together. Ask the camps what mitigation measures they have in place, if meals would be outdoors or inside in a crowded cafeteria, and what happens during rainy days. T.M.: In general, I think summer camps appear to be pretty safe based both on data from last summer and what we are seeing this summer. This is a situation where the child development benefits are huge, and so I’m really in favor of kids going to camps so long as some degree of masking and distancing can be maintained. Having the activities in well-ventilated and outdoor spaces certainly helps.Can kids safely go into crowded indoor areas like movie theaters or children’s gyms, as long as they wear a mask?S.O.: If you’re unvaccinated it’s not a great idea to do these super crowded activities. For the vaccinated it’s perfectly fine, but I would still recommend wearing a mask if you don’t know everyone’s vaccination status.T.S.: The CDC puts crowded indoor activities as their highest-risk category (“least safe”), which includes movie theaters. Risk can be reduced if everyone is masked, but space and ventilation are also key. I know some movie theaters are renting out spaces for private movies; perhaps something like this could be done instead. T.M.: It’s all about balancing risks. For indoor venues, it’s all about density. Low-density indoor activities where people are masked are higher risk than not going, but lower risk than if the venue is packed. What about having an indoor playdate with just a couple of other unvaccinated kids whose parents are vaccinated? Do my kids still need to wear a mask?T.S.: I am keeping my child masked when he is indoors with friends and trying to maximize time outdoors instead. But again, this is something that can vary depending on local transmission levels, and the exposures to other children and their parents. T.M.: I’m in favor of playdates for the same reasons as the other activities. I think so long as there are no symptomatic children, then unmasked activities are not unreasonable. I think it’s impractical to keep kids in a playdate masked the whole time anyway, and so long as the numbers are controlled it is not unreasonable. As with everything, outdoor activities might be a good way to reduce risk, but it’s about balance.

Patti LaBelle Was ‘Petrified’ After Losing Three Sisters to Cancer

Patti LaBelle Was ‘Petrified’ After Losing Three Sisters to Cancer

If you skipped a doctor’s visit or regular screening procedure during the COVID-19 pandemic, you’re not alone. But legendary singer Patti LaBelle would like you to book that overdue appointment ASAP.“I lost three sisters and a great friend to cancer before they turned 50,” LaBelle tells SELF. “My sisters died of colon cancer and lung cancer, and my friend died of breast cancer. So, after losing them, I was petrified that 50 would be my death point.” LaBelle, now 77, is passionate about making sure people go for their recommended screenings and take the steps they can to take care of their health. She stars in a new PSA for Time to Screen, a cancer screening awareness campaign from the Community Oncology Alliance (COA) and CancerCare.The right time for you to get screened depends on the type of screening and your individual risk factors. So if you’re not sure what procedures you’re due for, talk to your usual health care provider or check the Time to Screen site for the recommended guidelines. LaBelle, who has diabetes, says she’s personally been able to keep up with her routine doctor’s appointments “like clockwork”— even during the pandemic—thanks to the rise of virtual visits. But encouraging others in your life to get their recommended screenings isn’t always easy to do. When having those conversations, LaBelle says she always “comes from a heartfelt, true place,” and doesn’t mind being the one to remind people over and over. LaBelle also frequently talks about losing her sisters to cancer onstage. “It’s probably redundant,” she says. “I stay on people’s cases, I do that a lot.” And it’s true that “people were afraid for the last 17 months to go to a doctor’s office and get a screening procedure done,” she says. “They’re afraid of being diagnosed with cancer and then afraid of going to the facility that might not be safe because of COVID.” But now with vaccines available and with a better understanding of the virus, LaBelle says she “really prays that people take advantage of screening options.”For LaBelle, the pandemic has made her grateful to still be here. She’s spent her time finding ways to relax and engage in as many of her usual activities as COVID-19 safety protocols allow. That includes walking her dog Mr. Cuddles, catching up on Netflix, and cooking (socially distanced) Sunday dinners for family and friends. “We can’t stop living,” she says. “You can’t stop having fun.”Related:

Justin Bieber Stars in Balenciaga’s New Campaign

Justin Bieber Stars in Balenciaga’s New Campaign

MOONLIGHTING: A meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron wasn’t the only thing on Justin Bieber’s Paris agenda last month.
Rumors that the “Sorry” singer had taken advantage of his romantic getaway with wife Hailey Bieber in the French capital to shoot a Balenciaga campaign were confirmed on Friday, when the brand dropped the first of a series of portraits by American art photographer Katy Grannan.
To be revealed in three phases, the visuals also feature French actress Isabelle Huppert, alongside regular Balenciaga runway models Eliza Douglas, Awar Adhiero Odhiang, Anania Orgeas, Isabelle Weldon Herouard, Minttu Vesala, Litay Marcus, Emmanuel Culkin Mugisha, Abdou Diop, Taishi Suzuki and Hans Schmidt.

Isabelle Huppert in the Balenciaga campaign. 
Katy Grannan/Courtesy of Balenciaga

Shot on sets that evoke the atmosphere of Los Angeles parking lots, in a nod to Grannan’s street portraits, they show the models in seasonless ready-to-wear and accessories, including the Le Cagole handbag, named after derogatory French slang for people with a tacky dress sense.
Bieber wears the introduced DIY Runner sneakers, which feature a one-of-a-kind, handmade vintage look by using raw cuts, stitches and glue for the mesh and leather upper.
In the fall, Balenciaga unveiled a giant billboard on the side of the Louvre museum starring Cardi B, reclining on fake grass surrounded by kids’ toys. Stars including Hailey Bieber, Kim Kardashian and Kanye West are regulars at creative director Demna Gvasalia’s runway shows, including his recent debut at Paris Couture Week.

Balenciaga’s Le Cagole handbag. 
Courtesy of Balenciaga

SEE ALSO:
Cardi B Takes Over Louvre With Balenciaga Billboard
Inside Balenciaga’s Couture Comeback
Launch of Balenciaga Runner to Be Offered Exclusively at Kith

5 Ways to Manage Hidradenitis Suppurativa Groin Pain

5 Ways to Manage Hidradenitis Suppurativa Groin Pain

Hidradenitis suppurativa groin flare-ups can be one of the more painful aspects of the condition. The chronic skin disease causes bumps that can break open and release fluids, along with causing some serious discomfort. Typically, these lesions appear in areas where the skin rubs together, such as the underarms, breasts, and groin, but bumps can appear almost anywhere on the body and are uncomfortable in any location. That said, hidradenitis suppurativa groin flares come with particular challenges due to the sensitive area of the lesions. For example, walking, wearing underwear, and even sleeping can feel unbearable when you have throbbing pain.Since this can be a common and difficult aspect of this condition to manage, we asked five people with hidradenitis suppurativa for their advice on managing groin flare-ups. Hopefully, their strategies can help you find relief.1. Identify your triggers.Some people with hidradenitis suppurativa notice that certain events trigger flare-ups. Although individual triggers vary, some common ones include stress, heat, and sweat. Aliyah T., 28, was diagnosed with hidradenitis suppurativa in 2009 and says that she previously got flares a few days after smoking cigarettes. She mentioned the correlation to her dermatologist, who explained that smoking may trigger hidradenitis suppurativa. Now, Aliyah tells SELF, “I don’t smoke at all anymore.”Some people say that eating certain foods makes their hidradenitis suppurativa symptoms worse. For instance, Tom P., 31, says that he gets more flares when he regularly eats dairy products. “I almost exclusively get flares in my groin, and it’s always so much worse after dairy. I used to eat ice cream most days—it’s my favorite food—but since switching to dairy-free ice cream I get way fewer flares,” Tom tells SELF.2. Try to wear clothing that doesn’t aggravate your flares.Cathryn C., 28, says that wearing loose clothing made of comfortable fabrics has become really important since she was diagnosed with hidradenitis suppurativa in 2017. “I find that underwear material is very important. I used to be able to grab anything that I liked but now I have to check the material first. I always try to wear 100% cotton underwear as it’s breathable and won’t irritate my hidradenitis suppurativa as much,” Cathryn tells SELF. She also wears cotton leggings instead of denim because they are stretchier and more comfortable. “Jeans can be a rough material for me as they can sometimes cause too much friction on my groin area,” she says.Tanya, 28, says she wears long skirts and dresses without underwear when she has a really painful hidradenitis suppurativa groin flare. “It’s hard even to walk when you have a big flare in that area, and underwear makes it so much more painful,” she tells SELF.3. Avoid shaving when you have lesions.Shaving your skin during a hidradenitis suppurativa groin flare1 will only make your lesions worse, according to the Mayo Clinic. Aliyah noticed that shaving, in general, triggered her hidradenitis suppurativa groin outbreaks—so she stopped doing it. “I used to get really bad flares about two days after shaving. Now I let my pubic hair grow freely! The bumps have been much better since I started leaving the area alone, although they haven’t disappeared completely,” she says.If you prefer less hair, then be sure to follow shaving best practices (like shaving in the direction of your hair growth), or consider laser hair reduction2 if you’re a good candidate for the procedure and can afford it. Megan, 23, who was diagnosed with hidradenitis suppurativa in 2019, says that laser therapy has improved her quality of life. “Laser hair removal has made such a massive difference. I have way fewer flares in the groin and the ones I do get aren’t as big and heal quicker,” Megan tells SELF.

From Dash to Wrist

From Dash to Wrist

Porsche Design echoes its dashboard clock with a set of chronometers.
To complement the Sport Chrono Porsche Design clock designed for Porsche Panarama and the Porsche Taycan car interior, Porsche Design in the past year introduced a matching the Sport Chrono wristwatch collection.
The line, while not brand new, is impressive. It includes three models that closely match the automotive clock, complete with a small seconds subdial (above), plus one additional model boasting a flyback chronograph.
As with the clock, the operative word is chrono – for chronometer. While only one of the two models is a chronograph, both are officially certified COSC chronometers, with all the enhanced precision that certificate confers.
With its small seconds subdial at six o’clock as on the dashboard timer, the three-hand Sport Chrono Subsecond is 42mm titanium watch offered with either a black, blue or brown dial. Each dial comes with a color-matched rubber strap.
Inside these watches Porsche Design fits its estimable in-house developed Porsche Design caliber WERK 03.200.

The chronograph
While the Sub Second chronometer models feature closed case backs, the chronograph model boasts a clear sapphire case back. This wise choice offers a clear view of Porsche Design’s eye-catching caliber WERK 01.100, with its Porsche-centric P-Icon design.
Other classic Porsche Design features include an anti-reflective sapphire crystal, a leather strap made from Porsche interior leather and a titanium folding clasp with safety push buttons.
Prices: $4,750 (Sport Chrono Subsecond) and $6,150 (automatic chronograph). 

First Drives: Jaguar’s 2021 XF and F-Pace Mark the End of an Era with a Grand Exit

First Drives: Jaguar’s 2021 XF and F-Pace Mark the End of an Era with a Grand Exit

Jaguar is a brand that combines three favorite automotive traits to various degrees: performance, luxury and style. In the 1960s, models like the Mark 2 and the E-Type represented the fastest cars, by a considerable margin, that you could get at a semi-affordable price. In the 1970s, the marque underwent a significant transformation, mainly driven by the US market: Jaguars became plush and luxurious, the brand image was defined by polished burl walnut dashboards, Connolly leather and, of course, the silky V-12 engine. By 2007, with the advent of the original XF, the automaker had refocused on contemporary, modern styling epitomized by designer Ian Callum’s first-generation XF and, subsequently, by the F-Type.

Now Jaguar is reinventing itself again. On the cusp of the electric age that is presumably upon us, Jaguar has announced that it will go fully electric by 2025. That doesn’t just mean there will be no more conventionally powered cars launched; it means that the entire current lineup, with the exception of the I-Pace, will be gone in just three-and-a-half years. And the consolidation of the portfolio has begun.

For the grand finale, Jaguar has made the XF sedan and F-Pace SUV more attractive, and more affordable. We recently drove both of them—specifically, the XF P300 R-Dynamic SE AWD with a 296 hp four-cylinder, and the F-Pace P400 R-Dynamic S powered by a 395 hp straight-six engine.

The 2021 Jaguar XF sedan. 

Jaguar Land Rover Automotive PLC.

Let’s start with the XF, which according to Jaguar USA CEO Joe Eberhardt represents “a segment that has been reduced dramatically over the past few years.” Up to the last model year, Jaguar offered both the more compact XE and the XF and, just two years ago, Jaguar also offered the big XJ. Now it’s XF only, and it has gone from 10 versions down to only 3. The Sportbrake is gone, and so is the six-cylinder engine. There are no more diesels, either. How is less choice a good thing?
Not so fast, says Eberhardt: “If you have fairly small volumes with a highly complex and proliferated lineup, it gives the consumer the appearance of choice.” He notes, however, that customers often went to the dealer and found out that most variants were sold out. “So we focused on combinations that are most interesting from a customer perspective,” adds Eberhardt. And Jaguar made them less expensive, by a substantial amount. The entry-level price was lowered from $51,100 to $43,995, about 20 percent to 25 percent cheaper than a similar Audi A6, BMW 5-series or Mercedes-Benz E-Class.

The new XF wears more aggressively styled headlights and gaping front air intakes. 

Jaguar Land Rover Automotive PLC.

No wonder the XE is gone. “As you know, in the US bigger is better,” Eberhardt says. “There is really no benefit in having the smaller car.” But there is a benefit in having a small engine: With the switch from the aging AJ V-6 engine to the new Ingenium straight-six, there is simply no more room under the hood of the XF. A 2.0-liter four-cylinder, sold with 246 hp and rear-wheel drive, or with 296 hp and all-wheel drive, must do. According to Eberhardt, “A lot of our customers don’t know whether they have a four-, six- or eight-cylinder engine. They just know that around 300 hp will allow them to accelerate as quickly as they need.”
Before getting behind the wheel of the XF, we first notice the updated exterior. Little has changed, the most significant upgrade being the more aggressively styled headlights with double “J”-shaped LED stripes. And the XF sedan is now fitted with the smoked taillights previously used on the defunct Sportbrake version. Even the entry-level models feature the gaping front air intakes of the R-Dynamic variant, distinguished only by bright accents.

The XF is now fitted with the smoked taillights previously used on the defunct Sportbrake version. 

Jaguar Land Rover Automotive PLC.

The body has aged well, its proportions hinting at the rear-wheel-drive platform. The drag coefficient is an excellent 0.25, slightly better than before the facelift. The lower air intakes are more aggressive than before, especially on the standard versions, but conversely, the look is less elegant.
Yet those are small modifications. Far greater changes have taken place inside: The cockpit features generous, horizontal lines, a sculpted steering wheel—taken from the I-Pace—and a large, slightly curved touch-sensitive central screen that operates, among other things, Jaguar’s new “Pivi Pro” infotainment and navigation system that’s “always connected” and wants access to your phone and calendar in order to learn about your travel habits. It’s standard on the SE models, and it’s a quick and very competent setup.
The new XF’s interior is one of the more pleasant we’ve been in. Al Whelan, Jaguar’s creative director of interior design, mentions: “What we wanted to do is bring the lovely materials and the perforated grain leather close to the customer, where they can touch them.” Indeed, the materials are soft, beautiful and perfectly executed. And the “Est. 1935 Jaguar Coventry” lettering is a posh reminder of the brand’s heritage.

The interior of the XF features a sculpted steering wheel, taken from the I-Pace, and a large touch-sensitive central screen. 

Jaguar Land Rover Automotive PLC.

We did not fall in love with the new gear selector, however. The commonplace palm shifter, with a well-hidden unlock button, replaces the automatically rising rotating knob that had been a futuristic signature element of the brand. Another feature we could do without is the gesture-activated roof blind, a gimmick that doesn’t simplify anything. And while we are complaining, the open cupholders in the rear armrest look downright cheap. Moreover, for a new dashboard, the integration of the head-up display is loveless.
Starting the (clumsily named) XF P300 R-Dynamic SE AWD with the push of a button brings the Ingenium Four to life unobtrusively, aided by a noise-cancellation system. The engine allows for a rate of acceleration from zero to 60 mph in 5.8 seconds, and little distinguishes this power plant from similar four-cylinder offerings by the competition, but that’s not a bad thing. It does the job with competence and efficiency, aided by the ubiquitous and meritorious ZF 8HP automatic transmission that’s used in a vast number of premium cars.
The chassis hits a good compromise between ride and handling, with precise steering and a suspension setup that does a very nice job at absorbing uneven surfaces. And although the lane-keeping assistant did not excel, we prefer to turn those systems off anyway as soon as the drive commences.
Priced at $49,995, only $6,000 above the entry-level model, the top-tier XF we drove adds all-wheel drive, a more powerful engine tune and a plethora of extra equipment. It’s a steal.

The 2021 Jaguar F-Pace SUV. 

Jaguar Land Rover Automotive PLC.

Moving on to the updated F-Pace, we found that it starts out where the XF reaches its ceiling. The four-cylinder F-Pace begins at $49,995, but unlike the XF, the popular SUV comes with four-, six- and eight-cylinder engines. We drove the F-Pace P-400 R-Dynamic S, priced at a very competitive $65,200 and powered by a 395 hp 3.0-liter straight-six that drives all four wheels through a ZF eight-speed automatic.
The changes to the exterior of the F-Pace are subtle but a bit more extensive than on the XF. The SUV gets more angular taillights, and the sensors for the assistance systems are better hidden. The interior receives a major improvement with a dashboard—previously shared with the defunct XE—that is now identical with the one on the new XF. Thus, it comes with that big central screen, luxe materials and the same unremarkable gear selector.

Jaguar’s new “Pivi Pro” infotainment and navigation system aboard the F-Pace. 

Jaguar Land Rover Automotive PLC.

Unlike the XF, the F-Pace’s engine compartment has room for the 3.0-liter straight-six, a marvel of an engine that, in P400 trim, cranks out a healthy 395 hp, allowing the vehicle to cover zero to 60 mph in 5.0 seconds and cruise easily into triple-digit speeds. While the engine itself sounds silky-smooth, only the most tech-savvy occupants will appreciate the high-pitched whir of the electric supercharger that provides instant throttle response before the exhaust-fed twin-scroll turbocharger spools up.
The handling characteristics are still at the top of the class, the steering is precise. Yet it is comfortable enough on virtually every surface, and with the large trunk and generous rear seats, the updated F-Pace remains a veritable long-distance cruiser.

Our F-Pace P-400 R-Dynamic S tester was equipped with a 395 hp, 3.0-liter straight-six that drives all four wheels through a ZF eight-speed automatic transmission. 

Jaguar Land Rover Automotive PLC.

Also in contrast to the XF, The F-Pace doesn’t undercut the competition’s price, but is right in the center of its segment. And given its undeniable qualities and style, it remains one of the most attractive offers in the class. But we strongly recommend checking out the wild F-Pace SVR, priced at $84,600 and powered by a supercharged 5.0-liter V-8 that cranks out an impressive 550 hp.

The F-Pace’s interior receives a major improvement with a dashboard that is now identical with the one on the new XF. 

Jaguar Land Rover Automotive PLC.

Having spent time with the new XF and F-Pace, we find that they blend performance, luxury and style with a true value story. It’s hard be believe they represent the end of an era. No more gasoline-powered Jaguars after 2025? Perhaps it’s time to get one of the last ones, or hope for a “Plan B” in Coventry.

Learn more about Robb Report’s 2022 Car of the Year at the event taking place in Napa Valley here and in Boca Raton here.

My Bedtime Routine: Sue Bird on How Fiancée Megan Rapinoe Saved Her Skin

My Bedtime Routine: Sue Bird on How Fiancée Megan Rapinoe Saved Her Skin

In our Sleeping With… series, we ask people from different career paths, backgrounds, and stages of life how they make sleep magic happen.As Sue Bird gears up for her fifth Olympics appearance—and begins her quest for a record-setting fifth-straight gold in Tokyo—she’s learned a few things along the way about how to prep her body to perform for big games, when stress and expectations undoubtedly run high.“A lot of taking care of my body means making sure I’m getting enough sleep, and recovery is a big part of that,” Bird told SELF in late April at the start of her WNBA training camp in Seattle. “The better sleep you get, the better recovered you’ll be.”For Bird, the pandemic sparked a change in her nightly routine, encouraging her to try earlier bedtimes—at 9:30 p.m., for instance, the night before we spoke—simply because, well, there wasn’t a whole lot else to do that late. Turning in earlier, she realized, helped make sure she could log enough sleep to feel refreshed in the morning, the time of day she considers her “chill time,” where she can drink her coffee, send some emails, and ease into her scheduled tasks. “I don’t like to rush into my day,” she says.That’s a good thing, because these days, her days are certainly filled. Along with continuing to turn in record-breaking performances as a guard for the Seattle Storm—just before the WNBA’s season paused for the Olympics, she became the first player in league history to tally 3,000 assists—and preparing for the Tokyo Games, she also recently launched the digital media company TOGETHXR along with athletes Alex Morgan, Simone Manuel, and Chloe Kim. The company aims for more inclusive storytelling in sport and greater coverage of the next generation of female athletes.“The four of us—myself, Alex, Simone, and Chloe—we saw a need for this in the media world,” she says. “I think we’re getting a lot of amazing stories out, and that was the purpose, to get the stories out that don’t always get the love they deserve.”A social-justice activist off the court, Bird, who’s one half of one of the most well-known power couples in sports—her fiancée is soccer star Megan Rapinoe—is a mentor on the court as well. After competing in her first Games in 2004, she’s now one of the veterans on Team USA, which will include six athletes making their Olympic debuts. She’s also been chosen by fellow Team USA athletes to serve as a flag bearer for the opening ceremony in Tokyo.While the pressure to perform at such a high level and lead a team can be tricky, Bird is taking her fifth Olympics appearance in stride, and relying on all that she’s learned about her body over the years to help her power to gold. She sat down with SELF to share how her nighttime routine helps fuel the top-notch recovery she needs to win.Supplements aid my sleep (and recovery).I always drink Cherrish cherry juice. It has anti-inflammatory properties, so it’s good for my recovery. Sometimes I’ll actually make a smoothie that has some fruits or yogurt in it, and of course a little of that cherry juice. That’s like my dessert for the evening, and it’s one of the last things I have before I go to sleep.I’m also involved with a CBD company, Mendi, so depending on how I feel, I might take some gummies, which help with my sleep and recovery. They also have a stick, it’s kind of like a salve, that you can rub on anything that might be bugging you. So maybe that day if my neck felt weird, I’d rub it on my neck, or maybe my low back, and I always put some on my knee—I’ve just had a long career of knee issues and surgeries, so I always make sure I hit my knee up.

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