Charles Jeffrey Loverboy RTW Spring 2022

London Fashion Week’s most subversive — and cavalier — fashion showman, Charles Jeffrey kept the fashion pack hostage for nearly 75 minutes on Monday night to view his two-part spring event. London Mayor Sadiq Khan stood crammed behind a laser-beam fence with the sweaty, maskless fashion pack and assorted nightlife creatures to witness the spectacle in a grubby, airless nightclub.The look: Part one by Bradley Sharpe: An attempt at ’60s-era Balenciaga couture, in white fabrics resembling paper, and black ones that looked like trash bags. Part two by Jeffrey: The usual loud and zany clothes for party people who burn the candle at both ends, literally. Some even wore candles on their heads, yielding a creepy cap of melted wax.
Quote of note: “Approved attire includes the following…,” dictated the show’s “Rules of Entry.” The rules listed pretty much everything seen either in the audience, or on the runway: “Ceremonial garb, suede shoes, monocles, cowls, cheap wigs, shirts unbuttoned to the navel, handkerchiefs, studs, tunics, shrouds, over plucked eyebrows, green or lavender garments, wing collars, work boots, cocked hats, sleeveless undershirts, earrings, gowns, peroxide blonde hair, stars painted upon the brow, mantles, red neckties, tin foil bonnets, fresh blooms, heavy jewelry, sashes, sleeves rolled up to the armpits, black leather, high drag, scents of jasmine, camphor and frankincense.”

Key items: Lacquered and ruffled tartan capes and skirts, knit hats with floppy bunny ears, or some statement hair sculpture.
Takeaway: Charles Jeffrey is London’s torchbearer for expressive, excessive party clothes and streetwear, and arguably the season’s most indulgent young talent.

London Fashion Week’s most subversive — and cavalier — fashion showman, Charles Jeffrey kept the fashion pack hostage for nearly 75 minutes on Monday night to view his two-part spring event. London Mayor Sadiq Khan stood crammed behind a laser-beam fence with the sweaty, maskless fashion pack and assorted nightlife creatures to witness the spectacle in a grubby, airless nightclub.

The look: Part one by Bradley Sharpe: An attempt at ’60s-era Balenciaga couture, in white fabrics resembling paper, and black ones that looked like trash bags. Part two by Jeffrey: The usual loud and zany clothes for party people who burn the candle at both ends, literally. Some even wore candles on their heads, yielding a creepy cap of melted wax.

Quote of note: “Approved attire includes the following…,” dictated the show’s “Rules of Entry.” The rules listed pretty much everything seen either in the audience, or on the runway: “Ceremonial garb, suede shoes, monocles, cowls, cheap wigs, shirts unbuttoned to the navel, handkerchiefs, studs, tunics, shrouds, over plucked eyebrows, green or lavender garments, wing collars, work boots, cocked hats, sleeveless undershirts, earrings, gowns, peroxide blonde hair, stars painted upon the brow, mantles, red neckties, tin foil bonnets, fresh blooms, heavy jewelry, sashes, sleeves rolled up to the armpits, black leather, high drag, scents of jasmine, camphor and frankincense.”

Key items: Lacquered and ruffled tartan capes and skirts, knit hats with floppy bunny ears, or some statement hair sculpture.

Takeaway: Charles Jeffrey is London’s torchbearer for expressive, excessive party clothes and streetwear, and arguably the season’s most indulgent young talent.

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