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Watch Deema Al Asadi Reveal Her Style Superstars, from Her First Mother’s Day Gift to Boots from Her First TV Appearance

Watch Deema Al Asadi Reveal Her Style Superstars, from Her First Mother’s Day Gift to Boots from Her First TV Appearance

Deema Al Asadi joins us for the latest episode of My Style Superstars, bringing cherished pieces with stories many can relate to. The Dubai-based fashion blogger starts with a Van Cleef & Arpels ring which was gifted by her husband on her first Mother’s Day. “Being a mother is one of the most amazing things that has happened to me as a woman,” shares Al Asadi. Holding up a bubblegum pink Lady Dior bag next, she reveals that it is the first designer accessory she ever bought with her first salary. “I had a wishlist of the things that I wanted to buy but I do remember that it is one of the first pieces that I got,” she adds.
The third item—a pair of thigh-high Tory Burch boots—is linked to a particularly memorable time in Al Asadi’s career, and is part of her look from when she started her TV journey with the talk show Kalam Nawa’em. Recalling the time, she says, “This was my first episode and me, and my stylist Cedric decided that if we were going to do a look, it has to be something unique and represent by personality.”
Watch the video above to hear all the stories behind the special pieces in Al Asadi’s closet.

Watch Zainab Al-Eqabi Reveal Her Style Superstars, from a Graduation Gift to Her Mother’s Necklace

Watch Zainab Al-Eqabi Reveal Her Style Superstars, from a Graduation Gift to Her Mother’s Necklace

In the next episode of ‘My Style Superstars’, Zainab Al-Eqabi reveals her wardrobe’s most prized possessions, some of which happen to be gifts given at the most important points in her life.
First up, the para-athlete and presenter brings out her mother’s necklace which once belonged to her grandmother, and was later split into different pieces to be shared with her siblings. “It’s nice to know that I have the same necklace as my sisters,” she shares. Al-Eqabi also holds another jewelry piece gifted by her mother close to her heart. Given to her before she embarked on a year-long master’s course in the UK, the ring features the kahraman stone and served as a reminder of her mother while she was away from home. Al-Eqabi’s next item is sure to strike a chord with all those who have special memories of their first solo travel. Bought at a local Parisian shop during one of her first trips to the city, the bag marked a moment of celebration for Al-Eqabi’s independence. Al-Eqabi treated herself to another bag growing up—this time, after completing her master’s degree, “to tell myself that women should dream, and work hard to achieve their goals.”
Watch the video above to hear all the stories attached to the sentimental pieces in Al-Eqabi’s closet.

Watch Diala Makki Reveal Her Style Superstars, from Her Late Grandmother’s Necklace to a Bisht By Stéphane Rolland

Watch Diala Makki Reveal Her Style Superstars, from Her Late Grandmother’s Necklace to a Bisht By Stéphane Rolland

In the latest episode of ‘My Style Superstars’, TV presenter and journalist Diala Makki takes Vogue Arabia through the most cherished items in her closet.
Proving the power of jewelry that has passed through generations, the first piece revealed by Makki is a gold necklace that is over 100 years old. “I only wear it when I want some positive energy or when I’m about to venture into something new, and I want the protection of my grandmother, may she rest in peace,” confides Makki. The second item—a Class of 2021 cap from her third graduation—comes with an inspiring message from Makki, who completed her second master’s degree, in leadership in media. “It has been a wonderful achievement for myself,” shares Makki. “I really advise all women during different stages in their careers to go back to school. It’s very difficult for them to go back to that sense of discipline, but it taught me a lot, and I think I’m a completely different woman after I graduated.” The third piece is a special bisht with gold threads that was designed by Makki’s friend and renowned designer Stéphane Rolland. “I wore this bisht once, and it is very very dear to me because it was gifted by him,” says the presenter.
Watch the video above for more on what makes these items so special to Makki, and stayed tuned for more episodes.

Watch Emirati Entrepreneur Salama Mohamed Reveal Her Style Superstars, from a Vintage Rolex to Her First Louboutins

Watch Emirati Entrepreneur Salama Mohamed Reveal Her Style Superstars, from a Vintage Rolex to Her First Louboutins

We all have a few treasures in our wardrobes that have either seen the worst and best parts of our lives, have taken a great deal of saving up, or were purchases to come out of a ‘treat yourself’ moment. Whatever the story behind a piece may be, it needs to be told, and what better way than to have them take the spotlight in Vogue Arabia’s brand new video series, ‘My Style Superstars’?
First up, Emirati CEO and founder of skincare brand Peacefull, Salama Mohamed sits down to reveal the four items closest to her heart. Bringing out her vintage Rolex watch she says, “It’s very very old. When I saw it, I bought it for my birthday. One day I’m going to give it to my daughter.” The mother-of-two goes on to share that she gifted herself a pair of black Christian Louboutin pumps after giving birth to her son Khalifa. “It just gave me confidence and the feeling that I can do everything with a nice pair of Louboutins,” she confides. Mohamed also owns two special handbags with significant memories attached to them: a monogrammed Goyard, and a brown Hermès. Watch the video above to know the stories behind them, and stay tuned for more episodes from the series.

Enter the September 2022 Cover Shoot with Oscar-Nominee Sharon Stone

Enter the September 2022 Cover Shoot with Oscar-Nominee Sharon Stone

Sharon Stone + stunning fashion + the eccentric home of late set designer Tony Duquette: Enter our September 2022 cover shoot with a brand new video that sees the Oscar-nominated actor dressed in maximalist couture by Arab and international designers in a celebration of post-pandemic creativity.
Editor-in-chief: Manuel ArnautFashion director: Amine Jreissati Style: Paris LibbyHair: Sebastian Scolarici Makeup: Amy Oresman Producer: Sam Allison Director & DOP: Olav Stubberud Camera assistant: Hunter Moreno Edit & color: Eskil AbrahamsenMusic: Sølv Shot at Tony Duquette’s Dawnridge

A Day in the Life of (Almost) Glamorous Life of Lebanese Comedian Bassem Feghali

A Day in the Life of (Almost) Glamorous Life of Lebanese Comedian Bassem Feghali

Move over Nicole Kidman and Bella Hadid! There’s a new Balenciaga star in the area. Wearing statement looks from the house’s latest hyped couture show for our September issue, Lebanese comedian Bassem Feghali puts on his very own fashion extravaganza. Did you ever wonder what a day in the (almost) fabulous life of the hilarious artist—who became a pan-Arab sensation by impersonating some of the region’s biggest divas—looks like? We invite you to watch the video above and find out!
Videography and edit: Rodney RicoStyle: Amine JreissatiHair: Shei TanMakeup: MeylooMakeup assistant: Juliette FoucqueLight assistant: Xavier GrasProducer: Sam AllisonSpecial thanks to Michael Coorengel and Jean-Pierre Calvagrac

Get Ready with Salma Abu Deif for Her First Cannes Film Festival Red Carpet

Get Ready with Salma Abu Deif for Her First Cannes Film Festival Red Carpet

Before making her first-ever red carpet appearance at Cannes Film Festival, Salma Abu Deif gave Vogue Arabia an exclusive sneak peek behind her look. The Egyptian actor opted for a bold black dress by Pinko, paired with glittering Chopard jewelry, while her beauty look featured sleek hair and a bright red pout.
Watch the video above as Abu Deif shows us how she got ready for the big day.
Production: Koral Communication

Get Ready with Fatima AlBanawi for the Cannes Film Festival 2022

Get Ready with Fatima AlBanawi for the Cannes Film Festival 2022

After serving up a showstopping style moment on her first red carpet for this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Fatima Al Banawi took Vogue Arabia behind the scenes of her next red carpet appearance of the week. While a holographic caped dress by Rami Kadi was the Saudi actor and filmmaker’s choice for the premiere of Top Gun: Maverick, this time, she stepped out in a lilac frothy-hemmed number by another Lebanese designer, Georges Chakra, and Cartier jewelry.
Watch how she glammed up for the evening, made her dress selection, and more, in the video above.
Production and art direction: Alessandra Tomaso

Watch Musician Faouzia Get Ready for Chanel’s Cruise Show in Dubai

Watch Musician Faouzia Get Ready for Chanel’s Cruise Show in Dubai

As the Chanel Cruise show in Dubai saw guests fly in from all around the world, one of them had special preparation to do. Moroccan singer Faouzia arrived at the venue, tucked away in Dubai Creek Harbour, not only as a front row guest, but also as a surprise performer at the show’s after party. Ahead of her soulful performance of the hit song ‘Minefields’ with musical icon John Legend, the 21-year-old singer invited Vogue Arabia to give us a glimpse of her prep time at Dubai’s Mandarin Oriental Jumeirah Hotel.
Her chosen look? A playful ensemble comprising of a black turtleneck bodysuit with pink Chanel monograms all over, and comfy—aka, lounge-worthy—oversized pants. To accessorize and add a bit of bling to her outfit, Faouzia went with Chanel’s signature chain belt. Watch as she practices singing in her hotel room mere minutes before the show, and gets ready for her night out above.
Video: David Colmenares

Day in the Life of Somali Model Rawdah Mohamed

Day in the Life of Somali Model Rawdah Mohamed

She documented human history in For Sama, but for Oscar-nominated Waad Al-Kateab, the fight continues until Syria is free and justice is served.
Waad Al-Kateab wears Jumpsuit, Emilia Wickstead; earrings, Cleopatra’s Bling. Photography: Sebastian Böttcher
Waad Al-Kateab is sitting in the Channel 4 news offices in London. Her hair cut in a neat, long bob, she’s wearing a floral summer dress while the bright morning sun shines through the floor-to-ceiling windows behind her. She looks like any ordinary 29-year-old woman. Yet she’s anything but. In 2011, Al-Kateab was an activist with a camera who went on to film one of the most important documentaries of the 21st century: For Sama. The film spans five years in Syria, starting with the peaceful protests against president Bashar Hafez al-Assad, through the Arab Spring and, ultimately, Al-Kateab being forced to flee the country of her birth in 2016. Unlike some war documentaries, For Sama reveals the full spectrum of humanity beyond the frontlines. While it provides a raw, inside perspective of the horror and systematic attacks on civilians, it also underscores moments of joy. We see Al-Kateab marry Hamza, a doctor who built the hospital in Aleppo where most of the footage is filmed; we witness baby Sama enter the world, and we watch friends and strangers become one community amid darkness and despair.
Al-Kateab, a young filmmaker and citizen journalist who moved to Aleppo to study in 2009, always kept her Sony camcorder rolling, filming approximately 500 hours of footage. It took two years for her and co-director Edward Watts – who she met through her work as journalist for Channel 4 – to cut it down to a 95-minute documentary. For Sama went on to achieve global acclaim, receiving an Academy Award nomination for best documentary feature and winning best documentary at this year’s Bafta awards (where it also set a record for most nominated documentary), as well as four British Independent Film awards. The recognition is testament to Al-Kateab’s talent for showing the human story that so many governments still choose to ignore. Yet, a year after the release For Sama, there is a look of pain and sadness in her eyes. “Nothing has changed in Syria. It’s still happening,” she says. While news coverage of the civil war has decreased and the fanfare surrounding the film has slowed down, the crisis hasn’t ended. “There are still people in Aleppo being shelled and bombed.”
Waad Al-Kateab wears Dress, pants, Simone Rocha; earrings, Cleopatra’s Bling. Photography: Sebastian Böttcher
Does she feel guilty for leaving? Her body closes in on itself; she folds her arms and her eyes well up. “If we were there, we could help a little,” she says, her voice faltering. “One day I risked my life and went to Aleppo. I felt it was the right thing to do. Now, I know it’s the right thing to do but I feel I’m not able to do this. I’m not the same person who left the city in 2016. It’s confusing and the guilt is something I don’t expect I will get away from.” Of course, if she hadn’t left Aleppo, fleeing after Russia threatened to bomb the last hospital where they were working, For Sama may never have reached the big screen. “Sometimes I feel that was right, but there are times when I think, maybe I’m just saying this because I want to make it easier for myself,” she considers. “When I’m talking to someone who is still in Aleppo, I feel so much shame. I’m trying to help but I’m not there. It’s hard.”
Witnessing so much tragedy has left Al-Kateab battling with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. “My main problem is the nightmares. It’s still very real for me – I’ve never been able to ignore what happened,” she shares. She even feels guilty for having nightmares. “I know that whatever I feel now is nothing compared to what is still going on in Syria. What happened to me is just a little compared to other people. I would love one day to feel some healing, but the only thing that will help me do that is feeling justice for Syria and its people.”
Waad Al-Kateab wears Dress, Worme; shoes, Manolo Blahnik; earrings, Ara Vartanian; ring, Waad Al-Kateab’s own.Photography: Sebastian Böttcher
After fleeing Aleppo, Al-Kateab and her family lived briefly in Turkey before seeking asylum in the UK. That’s the abridged version – the full tale is one full of bureaucracy failings and political injustice.
Her family arrived in London in 2018, after the 2016 Brexit referendum, the result of which was in large part prompted by voters’ issues with border control around an influx of migrants and refugees. “I mean, oh my God,” she says, half laughing about the difficult timing. Yet, ever the pragmatist, Al-Kateab decided to not only be a voice for Syrians, but refugees, too. “I feel that I can affect people in their thinking about what it means to be a refugee, and why it’s important for us to not close ourselves. At the Baftas, I was the only refugee nominated. I felt that I was in a position where I could fight for different issues.”
“The most important thing is to maintain the conversation about Syria… it’s never too late for accountability and justice”
While she feels accepted in the UK, Al-Kateab struggles with displacement. She and her family never intended to leave Aleppo. They risked their lives and the lives of their children – she was pregnant with their second child – to stay in Syria. “When I watch the film I’m able to accept everything that happened to us, but the displacement I can’t feel OK about – when we were saying goodbye to the city…” She trails off briefly. “We were fighting so hard to stay.”
Al-Kateab’s daughters, Sama, who is now four-and-a-half, and Taima, who is three, have settled into life in England. Like her mother, Sama initially experienced nightmares. “We had doctors help her and she is much better. She rarely wakes up at night crying or screaming now,” Al-Kateab shares. The girls have adapted so well that they even have London accents, which Al-Kateab half-facetiously seems less than keen on – not so much for the actual dialect than for their heritage. “They are happy,” she says, smiling. “They speak a mix of English and Arabic. We are trying to keep the Arabic level good, but it’s difficult.”
Waad Al-Kateab wears Dress, Roksanda; shoes, Jimmy Choo; earrings, rings, bracelets, Bar Jewellery; ring, Alighieri. Photography: Sebastian Böttcher
While Sama is too young to remember what she witnessed in Aleppo, her mother aims to keep the girls connected to their roots. Al-Kateab is hopeful. “As Sama grows older, she will be able to understand more. We try to keep the conversation about Aleppo and Syria and I’m trying to tell them stories before bed. I want to keep part of that culture that Hamza and I believe in, and we feel that they should know where they come from, including all the elements like Ramadan and Eid.” One way to understand is to watch her searing documentary. “I don’t know if I will show them the film,” says Al-Kateab. “We need to see when they are ready. Sama has seen the trailer – she loves to watch it.” Naya al Altrash, the daughter of a family friend, Afraa Hashem – both of whom feature in For Sama – was shown the documentary when she was six. “The film answered so many questions for her,” explains Al-Kateab. “She was three-and-half when she left. Now, she is able to see the story as someone from the inside and the outside.”
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Since moving to London – the family was granted leave to remain shortly after arriving – Hamza is no longer practicing as a doctor but is working towards a master’s degree in public health. Al-Kateab continues to work as a journalist for Channel 4, producing stories on justice, Syria, and Covid-19. She is also dedicated to three major ventures: a fiction project related to Syria, a new documentary, and Action for Sama, an ongoing campaign to end the targeting of healthcare facilities in Syria. It’s currently building a case against the Syrian regime and Russia for alleged war crimes – For Sama footage will be used as evidence. “The most important thing is to maintain the conversation about Syria,” Al-Kateab says. “If it’s too late for governments to intervene and stop it, it’s never too late for accountability and justice.”
While Al-Kateab may feel guilt for not being in Syria, she continues to fight for Aleppo from afar. “My main hope is to see something changed in Syria soon. I hope we can return to the place we fought for,” she says. Her dream is for citizens to feel empowered. “That’s why this whole Syrian revolution started. If we felt that we were being respected, or empowered, I think the situation wouldn’t have come to this.” After her years staring death in the eye, her words are poignant. “When I was in Aleppo, I was forced to live as if every moment was my last. Until today, I feel that this is the best thing to do. There is not a lot of time in the future so everything you want to do, do now. Tell everyone you love that you love them, right now. Don’t hide any of these feelings because when you have lost them, there is no more time.” 
Read more: Meet The Beirut Fashion Designers Refusing To Give Up Hope

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