Tiffany & Co.

13 of Lady Gaga’s Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments Through The Years

13 of Lady Gaga’s Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments Through The Years

Photo: Getty
Lady Gaga has been wowing the world with her bold performances and head-to-toe fantastical looks from the moment she burst on to the music scene in 2008, and jewelry has always firmly been a part of her self-mythologizing role-play – whether she is spinning a tale of outrageous avant-garde or full-blown Hollywood glamour. From her early homemade looks and dramatic costume jewelry to her adoption of a more refined aesthetic, Vogue takes a look back at her most incredible jewelry moments and proves yet again why the performer is a living legend.
2008. In this early TV appearance, a hint of Lady Gaga’s future avant-garde style is on view with her giant kawaii hair-bow and crystal shoulder piece. An oversized crystal ring provides the finishing touch. Photo: Getty
August 2009. Arriving at Tokyo airport in 2009, Lady Gaga channeled a Desperately Seeking Susan-era Madonna with armfuls of punky studded leather bracelets. Photo: Getty
2010. Lady Gaga made sartorial history at the MTV Video Music Awards by appearing in this now iconic dress, designed by Franc Fernandez – but how do you accessorise a gown made from fresh meat? With a neck and arms full of crystals, of course. Photo: Getty
September 2012. For the launch of Fame, her first perfume in 2012, Lady G fully committed as always to the task in hand. From her adorned beehive to her earrings, her jewellery channeled the black and gold design of the fragrance bottle. Photo: Getty
October 2012. For the London launch of the fragrance, she preempted the body jewellery craze that was to come with bejewelled fingers and matching talons dripping in gold. Photo: Getty
February 2015. A more glamorous Gaga emerges as the years go by. For the Grammys in 2015, she went for the green goddess contrast of silver couture and giant emeralds, the latter provided by Lorraine Schwartz. Photo: Getty
February 2015. Taylor Kinney proposed to Gaga on Valentine’s Day 2015 with a six- to eight-carat heart-shaped diamond by Lorraine Schwartz. She shared their happy news on Instagram. The couple split up in the summer of 2016. Photo: Instagram.com
2016. Only white diamonds would do for her (almost) demure look with a Marilyn Monroe-inspired blonde coiffure and make-up at the Golden Globes, where Gaga took home the prize for Best Performance in a Miniseries or Television Film for American Horror Story: Hotel. Photo: Getty
September 2018. The monochrome look was reversed for the Toronto Film Festival screening of A Star is Born that October. Giant white diamond earrings by Chopard stand out majestically against an all-black Armani Privé look. Called the Gardens of Kalahari earrings, they centre on a 25-carat pear-shaped diamond on one side and a 26-carat heart-shaped diamond on the other. The earrings were also worn by Charlize Theron at the 2017 Oscars. Photo: Getty
September 2018. Her engagement ring from ex-fiancé Christian Carino was in the same traditional cluster setting style as Lady Diana Spencer’s engagement ring, but in true Lady Gaga fashion, it was supersized and in a cartoonish pink. Opinion was divided over whether it was a pink sapphire or diamond. Photo: Getty
January 2019. At the Screen Actors Guild Awards, Gaga channeled sophisticated glamour with a diamond, platinum and gold choker with heart and star motifs and butterfly wing gold and diamond earrings from the 2019 Tiffany Blue Book collection alongside several Tiffany T bracelets. Photo: Getty
February 2019. For the Oscars, Lady Gaga wore the 128.54-carat Tiffany Diamond, one of the largest yellow diamonds in the world. Rarely seen out in public since Charles Lewis Tiffany acquired it in 1878, it had last been worn by Audrey Hepburn in a Breakfast at Tiffany’s promotional shoot. It has since had another outing in this year’s About Love campaign starring Beyoncé and Jay-Z. Photo: Getty
January 2021. For her performance of the American national anthem at President Joe Biden’s inauguration, Lady Gaga wore a brooch specially designed for the occasion by Schiaparelli’s Daniel Roseberry. The giant gilded dove of peace spoke volumes about the performer’s feelings on the occasion, and demonstrated the power of a jewel to convey a message. “Jewellery is there to heighten the fantasy of haute couture,” Roseberry told me at the time. “It reminds me a lot of decorating a room. It’s the chandelier that brings the room alive.” Photo: Getty
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

How Tiffany & Co.’s Timeless Pieces are Furthering its Legacy of Women Empowerment

How Tiffany & Co.’s Timeless Pieces are Furthering its Legacy of Women Empowerment

Already an icon in jewelry design, Tiffany & Co. furthers its legacy of female empowerment and sustainability with breath-taking collections that honor its exquisite gems – as well as the women who wear them.
Suhilah (top left) wears Tiffany HardWear necklace, Tiffany T True bracelet, Tiffany T1 bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond ring, Tiffany T1 ring, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Noura (left) wears left hand Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds right hand Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings; dress, Abadia. Afaf (middle left) wears Tiffany HardWear necklace, Tiffany T diamond bangle, Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Sara (middle right) wears Tiffany T1 pendant necklace with diamonds, Tiffany Victoria® Vine ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond ring, Tiffany Victoria® earrings with diamonds; dress, Self-Portrait at Rubaiyat; pants, Abadia. Aisha (right) wears right hand Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany HardWear bracelet with diamonds left hand Tiffany T T1 ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
When thinking of Tiffany & Co., it’s not difficult to conjure images of a blue box, sparkling diamonds, and Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Since its establishment in 1931 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, the American high jewelry brand has come to be synonymous with quality material and novel design.
However, alongside this feat, the house is known to champion women’s empowerment and sustainability. In 2017, the jeweler reinforced its commitment to women’s rights, human rights, diversity, and inclusion by signing on to the United Nations Women’s Empowerment Principles, and continues to invest in programs to advance gender equality. It also remains committed to protecting the planet, setting for itself major sustainability goals for 2025, which prioritize transparency, appropriate waste recycling and land management, water stewardship, and the well-being of its workers. To celebrate the luxury heritage house’s legacy, Vogue Arabia brought together London-based Saudi entrepreneur Aisha Almamy and her sisters Afaf, Suhilah, Noura, and Sara, to present Tiffany & Co.’s most timeless pieces in the September 2021 issue.
Noura (left) wears left hand Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds right hand Tiffany Victoria Vine ring with diamonds; Tiffany Victoria earrings with diamonds. Aisha (middle) wears right hand Tiffany Victoria® ring with diamonds, Tiffany Victoria® Vine ring with diamonds left hand Tiffany Victoria® ring with diamonds; dress, 16Arlington from Rubaiyat. Sara (right) wears Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Lynn earrings with diamonds; dress, Self-Portrait at Rubaiyat. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
A reinvention of the classic Tiffany T collection, the Tiffany T1 expands on the iconic motif that John Loring, the company’s design emeritus, introduced in the early 1980s. Gasconading 18ct rose gold bracelets and rings in wide and narrow widths set with pavé diamonds in a honeycomb pattern, everything from the T1 hinged bangle to the circle pendant aims to represent strength and self-empowerment.
Who can forget the Tiffany HardWear collection released in 2017? Looking to New York City and a unisex bracelet found in the house’s 1971 archive for inspiration, the bracelets, necklaces, earrings, and rings play with tension, proportion, and balance. The Link Bracelet, for example, features large-gauge links in glimmering 18ct rose gold accented by shimmering diamonds, while the Drop Earrings encompass a trio of spheres that dangle from delicate ball chains against captivating locks.
On platinum drop earrings, bracelets, and necklaces, the Tiffany Victoria collection blooms into complex mixed-cut diamond clusters suggestive of flower petals, which can be turned into ornamental headpieces for an unexpected graceful detail. Meanwhile, acclaimed jewelry designer Jean Schlumberger’s works pay tribute to the natural world, with its distinctive bloom of colored gemstones, lending to motifs of wildflowers, twisting vines, and honeybees along with the artisan’s signature X on braided 18ct gold rope rings and the timeless Lynn bracelet.
Afaf (left)wears right hand Tiffany T1 narrow diamond hinged bangle with diamonds in 18ct gold, Tiffany T pavé diamond hinged bangle in 18ct gold left hand Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Lynn Bracelet with diamonds in 18ct gold and platinum, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Sixteen Stone ring with diamonds in 18ct gold and platinum; dress, Abadia. Suhilah (right) wears right hand Tiffany T True hinged bracelet in 18ct gold, Tiffany T1 wide hinged bangle in 18ct gold, Tiffany Atlas® X Closed narrow ring with diamonds in 18ct gold, Tiffany T1 narrow diamond ring in 18ct gold, Tiffany HardWear graduated link necklace in 18ct gold left hand Tiffany T1 wide ring in 18ct gold; Tiffany HardWear graduated link earrings in 18ct gold; top, Dolce & Gabbana at Rubaiyat, pants, Philosophy at Rubaiyat. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
Atlas X – an update to the iconic Atlas collection – is a nod to the Roman numerals on the clock at the Tiffany Fifth Avenue flagship store in New York City. With powerful angles, clean lines, and statement silhouettes united with graphic simplicity, the collection is crafted from 18ct gold, sterling silver, and pavé diamonds. With three different motifs on earrings, pendants, and more, closed and open forms are juxtaposed in a myriad of textures, robust angles, and modern proportions.
In 2020, Tiffany & Co. launched the Diamond Craft Journey, becoming the first global luxury jeweler to disclose the country where its diamonds and stones are crafted. The journey outlines several steps in the brand’s diamond-making process, including responsible sourcing, cutting and polishing, grading and quality control, diamond setting, and packaging.
Read Next: Beyoncé Wears Audrey Hepburn’s Priceless Breakfast At Tiffany’s Diamonds in Her First Tiffany Campaign
Style: Lina Malaika and Samar EdreesHair: Sawsan LilishMakeup: Eilaf SabbaghOn-set producer: Mohammed JassemProduction: Danica ZivkovicSenior fashion market editor: Amine JreissatiPhotography assistant: Asma AlshaikhMakeup assistant: Maysan HarasaniModels: Aisha, Afaf, Suhilah, Noura, Sara

Beyoncé Wears Audrey Hepburn’s Priceless Breakfast At Tiffany’s Diamonds in Her First Tiffany Campaign

Beyoncé Wears Audrey Hepburn’s Priceless Breakfast At Tiffany’s Diamonds in Her First Tiffany Campaign

Beyoncé and Jay-Z for the Tiffany & Co. Fall 2021 About Love Campaign. Photo: Mason Poole
When you have Beyoncé and Jay-Z starring in a campaign that will hopefully usher in a new era of your brand, you break out the big guns. For Tiffany & Co, that meant adorning Beyoncé in the 128.54 carat Tiffany Diamond previously only worn by three other people (one of them being Audrey Hepburn), along with a host of other luxury jewels.
Of course, the priceless Fancy Yellow diamond on a long chain adorned with over 100 carats of diamonds itself looks right at home around Beyoncé’s neck as she poses for Tiffany’s new About Love campaign, shot by Mason Poole and styled by June Ambrose and Marni Senofonte, and the accompanying video, shot by Black Is King director Emmanuel Adjei. Her hair, styled by Jawara Wauchope and Nakia Rachon, is piled on top of her head in a glamorously unkempt up ’do and her make-up is subtle, save for a dramatic cat eye (perhaps another nod to Hepburn’s Holly Golightly). The priceless necklace matches her 22-carat cushion-cut yellow diamond ring, two of many diamond-heavy pieces she wears throughout the campaign.
Beyoncé and Jay-Z for the Tiffany & Co. Fall 2021 About Love Campaign. Photo: Mason Poole
Jay-Z, in a neat black tux that complements Beyoncé’s curve-skimming, black cut-out dress, has his own fair share of jewels. A Bird on a Rock brooch by Jean Schlumberger, one of the most renowned jewellers of the 20th-century who was once vice president of Tiffany & Co, was refashioned into a one-of-a-kind pair of cufflinks for the rapper. He also wears a striking Apollo brooch in platinum, yellow gold, and diamonds, as well as a slew of other Tiffany pieces including one of their new engagement rings for men.
“Beyoncé and Jay-Z are the epitome of the modern love story,” Alexandre Arnault, executive vice president of product & communications said in a release. “As a brand that has always stood for love, strength and self-expression, we could not think of a more iconic couple that better represents Tiffany’s values. We are honored to have the Carters as a part of the Tiffany family.”

Given it’s the first time the couple has starred in a campaign together, you’d have a hard time imagining what could create more buzz. Which is exactly the point. The campaign ushers in a new era at Tiffany’s under the creative direction of Ruba Abu-Nimah, who was appointed in March. Continuing that partnership, Tiffany will also donate $2 million towards Historically Black Colleges and Universities.
But while the star power will undoubtedly bring in the couples’ fanbase, there are some Easter eggs for Tiffany fans as well. The film pays homage to Breakfast at Tiffany’s with a new version of the song “Moon River,” sung by Beyoncé and captured on Super 8 film by Jay-Z. For art fans, the Carters pose in front of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Equals Pi painting, which is rendered in Tiffany Blue (part of a private collection, the piece has never been on public display before). The film will be released on Tiffany’s website on September 15. We can’t wait to hear Beyoncé’s take on the iconic song. Until then, these images will be burned in our memory – not least because of the blinding diamonds.
Read Next: Beyoncé Makes a Case for Summer Color Blocking and Micro Bags in New Look
Originally published on Vogue.com

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