Stella McCartney

20 of the Best Jeans in Every Kind of Style

20 of the Best Jeans in Every Kind of Style

After lounging in sweats last summer, it’s now time to step out in your best denim. Jeans are a wardrobe staple that will never go out of style: pair with a simple T-shirt (so 70s Jane Birkin), an OTM crochet top and bucket hat, a silk shirt, and blazer… The options are endless.
Loose-fit jeans are the new skinny and were spotted all over the SS21 runway. Chanel paired wide styles with a mini bag belt and signature tweed jacket, while Balmain declared the 90s are back with skinny flares under strappy dresses. Stella McCartney’s 70s flare is the definition of nostalgia (with a fresh twist), and those straight-leg styles by Versace? Utterly timeless. Choosing the right pair for you means making your selection based on what you feel confident in and will work with your current wardrobe – after all, the beauty of denim is its ability to mix and merge seamlessly with any number of key pieces.
Scroll through to see a range of jeans for all sizes, shapes, and personal styles…
Read Next: 10 Little White Dresses to Gleam in Like Dua Lipa This Summer

How to Buy a Sustainable Wedding Dress in 2021

How to Buy a Sustainable Wedding Dress in 2021

From the eco-conscious brands you need on your radar to purchasing a vintage or pre-owned wedding dress — here’s what you should know.
Tess van Zalinge. Photographed by Vivian Hoorn
While large-scale weddings are not currently possible due to Covid-19 restrictions, many couples have opted for smaller, more intimate affairs instead. And with in-person fittings mostly off the cards, many brides have been rethinking their wedding dresses, including opting for more low-key — and sustainable — choices for their big day. 
Despite not having a specific bridal line, eco-conscious brand Maggie Marilyn has certainly seen more interest from brides in her ready-to-wear pieces since the pandemic began. “With everything going on in the world right now, there is an element of brides toning it down a little bit, which feels fresh and modern,” the brand’s founder Maggie Hewitt tells Vogue. “Brides are choosing to wear pieces that align with their values when they get married, too, which is exciting.” 
Maggie Marilyn. Photographed by Peter Van Alpen
For those looking for a more traditional wedding gown, vintage has also become an increasingly popular choice for eco-minded brides. Lyst reported that searches for vintage wedding dresses were up by a staggering 297% in the 48 hours after Princess Beatrice opted to borrow a 1960s Norman Hartnell dress from her grandmother, the Queen, for her wedding in July 2020.
Rental and upcycling are also on the rise, as brides become increasingly conscious of the environmental impact of a dress that you only wear once. Here is Vogue’s ultimate guide to sustainable wedding dresses in 2021. 
Sustainable wedding dress brands to know 
Designers such as Stella McCartney and Gabriela Hearst — both known for their sustainable practices — are obvious places to start your wedding dress hunt, but it’s also worth trying Maggie Marilyn, Mother of Pearl, and Reformation if you’re looking for a more relaxed option. 
Cecilie Bahnsen Encore. Photo: Courtesy of Cecilie Bahnsen
In fact, going for a style that “you can wear again and again” will only boost the dress’s sustainability credentials, Hewitt adds. That’s why Cecilie Bahnsen’s Encore range — made from leftover materials — is another fantastic option, featuring intricately crafted pieces that can be worn on your big day and beyond (especially when parties are finally allowed again). 
Vintage and pre-owned wedding dresses
By wearing vintage on your wedding day, you’re not only extending the life of a pre-existing dress — it’s also likely to be a one-of-a-kind piece, making it an extra special choice. “It’s about customers wanting to make more meaningful purchases and wearing something unique; something with a story on their special day,” explains Marie Blanchet, founder and CEO of Mon Vintage. 
With so much choice out there, it helps to narrow down what you’re looking for. Styles from the 1960s are trending at the moment, according to Blanchet, while other brides are opting for old-school Hollywood glamour from the 1930s and 1940s. The white pantsuit, too, is having somewhat of a resurgence thanks to the rise of the micro-wedding. Look for a vintage specialist who will tailor the pieces to your measurements, advises the expert, adding that it’s better to buy a piece that’s too big than too small. 
If you’re looking for a modern pre-owned option, try bridal-specific marketplaces such as Still White and Brides Do Good, as well as resale sites like The RealReal and Vestiaire Collective. There you’ll find gowns by the likes of Carolina Herrera and Emilia Wickstead, all for a fraction of the price of a brand new wedding dress. 
Mother of Pearl. Photo: Courtesy of Mother of Pearl
Renting a wedding dress 
With rental fashion on the rise in recent years, it’s no surprise that more brides are considering renting a dress as their ‘something borrowed’. “It makes so much sense to rent if it’s just for that one day,” says Eshita Kabra-Davies, founder and CEO of rental app By Rotation, which now sees past brides loaning out their own wedding dresses (Cecilie Bahnsen, Jacquemus and Ganni are all popular options). 
If you can’t find your dream dress to rent, it’s definitely worth considering borrowing your wedding day accessories instead — whether that’s a Simone Rocha handbag or a Shrimps faux-pearl headband to finish off your look.
Tess van Zalinge. Photographed by Vivian Hoorn
How to upcycle your wedding dress 
While wedding dresses typically end up in a box at the back of people’s wardrobes, many brides are now contemplating how they can give their gowns a second life. Bridal designer Alice Temperley has shown how to dye her dresses using natural materials while rising brands such as Wed Studio and Tess van Zalinge are turning old pieces into modern separates that can be worn day to day.
Ultimately, it’s about reducing waste as much as possible. As Van Zalinge explains, “You could buy a dress that you’re going to wear for just one day, but you have to think about what you could do with it afterwards.” 
Read Next: 10 Little White Dresses to Gleam in Like Dua Lipa This Summer
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

15 Sustainable Fashion Buys for Summer

15 Sustainable Fashion Buys for Summer

As fashion’s focus continues to shift in favor of sustainability and ethical design practices, the challenge for buyers is becoming clear: What even is sustainable fashion? How do we know if pieces marketed as ‘sustainable’ are really kinder for the environment? What are the main benefits of buying from sustainable brands?
Upcycling old garments (look to Levi’s denim) and repurposing fabrics are just two ways brands can save on waste, water usage and their impact on the environment. Reformation began by selling vintage clothing out of a small Los Angeles storefront in 2009 – now the label creates its own designs and is 100% carbon neutral. To prove its commitment to the cause, they introduced RefScale, an internal lifecycle tool that can track the environmental impact that any of their creations has on the environment. Want to know how much CO2, water and waste you’ve saved by shopping a specific piece? They can tell you.
The real trailblazer in the quest for a sustainable fashion industry (well, at least as sustainable as possible while still being able to exist), is of course, Stella McCartney. Her aim? A wholesale change of operations; a new approach that will transform a linear economy – produce, consume, dispose – into a circular one which regenerates itself in diverse, non-damaging ways. Young designers like Marine Serre and Matty Bovan are already experimenting with upcycled, DIY creations but a veritable fashion system revolution would require vast monetary and planning investments from enlightened governments. McCartney is convinced it can be done if the design fuels desire.
We may not know what this summer holds for us but if a vacation is on the cards and you’re looking for one or two buys to spruce up a capsule of longtime favorites, then why not make them sustainable? We’ve rounded up 15 chic summer-ready pieces – from denim shorts to chic beach bags – by brands that live and breathe sustainability…
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25 of the Best Swimwear Pieces for Summer Days Ahead

25 of the Best Swimwear Pieces for Summer Days Ahead

With the temperatures rising and vacation plans (finally) underway, there’s no better time to update your swimwear wardrobe. From crochet to animal prints to sporty cut-out designs and retro-inspired one-pieces, brands have gone all-out this summer to offer a variety of styles, shapes and colors to suit you and your destination of choice.
SS21 swimwear is all about the details, with many designers taking their cue from the 70s and 90s to include bright neons, bohemian styles and one-shoulder cuts. Celebrities including Lizzo, Kylie Jenner and Bella Hadid have already jumped on board with the latest trends and have been spotted rocking crochet, funky retro prints, cut-out swimsuits, preppy one-pieces and barely-there string bikinis.
Note the trends but remember, choosing the right color, style and shape for you is key: the only goal is to feel your very best in your body. We’ve rounded up 25 of our favorite pieces, for long beach days and lazy poolside lounging…
Read Next: 12 Summer Denim Buys with Plenty of Mix-and-Match Potential

Why Pink Will Always Be the Color That Shocks, Entices, and Enthralls

Why Pink Will Always Be the Color That Shocks, Entices, and Enthralls

From a history of rich meaning and traditions, pink still rises as the color to shock, entice, and enthrall.
Photographed by Julien Vallon
Ursula von der Leyen’s mood was about as magenta pink as her blazer when she was denied a proper seat during a diplomatic visit to Turkey in April. The first woman to head the European Commission and one of the most powerful in the world was relegated to a couch as her colleague Charles Michel, president of the European Council, and President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey settled into two chairs. Afterward, standing tall before the European Parliament, Von der Leyen warned that sexism endures at all levels. The German politician even speculated if appearing in less feminine attire would have granted her the treatment she deserved that day. “Would this have happened if I had worn a suit and a tie?” she asked.
Photo: Courtesy of Chanel
Historically, pink has proven to be one of the most emotionally evocative and controversial colors of all the spectrum. It’s most dazzling iteration, shocking pink, was popularized by the late Italian couturier Elsa Schiaparelli, who made the intense magenta her signature color in 1937, ensuring her subsequent designs stood out against the austere palettes of the battle-weary Forties. Decades later, further socio-political movements in the west would embrace the color again, when knitted pink hats became a symbol of the 2017 Women’s March, a worldwide protest movement against US President Donald Trump.
Pink is said to have been worn in ancient India and imperial China, as well as the upper echelons of 18th century European society, where it was a symbol of social status, since the materials used to dye such lavish garments were imported from expensive expeditions to central Asia and South America. In art, it symbolized youth and romance. Madame de Pompadour, the chief mistress of Louis XV of France, was so enamored with the color, French porcelain manufacturer Sèvres created a shade specifically for her, called Rose Pompadour, in 1757. Yet for centuries, the color was associated with masculinity, with boys being dressed in pink and girls in blue (with babies traditionally wearing white and the military mostly wearing red, pink was seen as appropriate for boys). This connection only started swapping in the 1940s, with the final transition to pink as a feminine color coming in the 1950s, when US first lady Mamie Eisenhower wore a pink gown as her inaugural dress, thereby cementing the color as one for “ladies.”
Photo: Courtesy of Stella McCartney
Bright pink soon found its way to the big screen, too. Marilyn Monroe wore shocking pink to scintillating effect in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953). Dressed in a raspberry William Travilla silk strapless gown and matching opera gloves, Monroe swatted away suitors with her fan while singing “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend.” In the 1957 Audrey Hepburn movie Funny Face, the magazine editor-in- chief character Maggie Prescott sings an ode to the color, exclaiming, “If she’s gotta think, think pink!” And who can forget the pink satin jackets donned by the Pink Ladies in the 1978 film Grease? The color made it off-screen, too, with many stars choosing shades of pink for some of their biggest moments. A tearful Gwyneth Paltrow wore a powder pink Ralph Lauren gown when she accepted her best actress Oscar in 1999; Rihanna chose a voluminous Giambattista Valli dress for the 2015 Grammy Awards; Lady Gaga displayed her unbridled sense of female emancipation on the 2019 Met Gala red carpet in a billowing shocking pink Brandon Maxwell dress.
Marilyn Monroe. Photo: Alamy
Designers from Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel to Schiaparelli’s most recent successor, Daniel Roseberry, demonstrate that pink is a symbol of feminine power. For his SS21 couture presentation, Roseberry borrowed a page from the maison’s surrealist past, unfurling a glossy black molded bustier with chiseled abs, enveloped in a signature shocking pink bow. “The pink, in particular, I find to be a very modern code of the house,” reflects the artistic director.
Lady Gaga. Photo: Getty
Regional couture designers Zuhair Murad, Nicolas Jebran, Azzi & Osta, and Rabih Kayrouz are also helping propel pink through the millennium. Known for their fashion-forward couture, George Azzi and Assaad Osta opted for a dessert motif for their SS21 collection of floor-sweeping evening looks, including luxuriant jumpers fastened with glamorous swathes of iridescent melon satin. “We don’t see pink as a color for girls. With its endless shades, pink can be perfect for decoration, interiors, menswear… Anything, really. For women, it signifies blush powders, vibrant skin, attractiveness… It represents the softer or wilder side of a man or woman,” Azzi & Osta explains. Meanwhile, Chanel offered bubblegum pink tweed suits styled over magenta swimsuits for Resort 2021; Loewe featured the rosy hue as a backdrop for sunflower prints for SS21; Gucci SS21 offered electric pink as potential officewear in the form of a shirt and pants; and Stella McCartney broke out the potent hue across a one- sleeved dress with capuche for its SS21 presentation.

Many of the colors on the runway are conceived by textile mills like Taroni SpA near Italy’s palazzo- studded Lake Como. Its CEO and creative director, Maximilian Canepa, a 12th generation textile maker, is the keeper of more than 1000 color recipes influenced by everything from shiny salmon skins to corals; from camellias plucked from the family garden to the vintage cars. “If you take a color from something valuable or so rare in nature and from something powerful and rich, it resonates with creatives,” remarks Canepa.
Photo: Courtesy of Zuhair Murad
Pink does have its naysayers, though, especially among people rejecting the rigid gender-conformity still associated with it. While some parents choose not to buy their daughters any rose-colored clothing, others have spoken about being “pink shamed” for dressing them in pink instead of more gender-neutral colors. Perhaps pink will always carry the ability to shock. Roseberry considers that the prowess the color stands for has become even stronger over time. It is a hue ever related to power, creativity, and individuality – fit for the women of today.
Read Next: Burberry Makes History with this Groundbreaking Pledge
Originally published in the June 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

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