Saudi Arabia

This Saudi High Jewelry Brand Has Something for Every Occasion

This Saudi High Jewelry Brand Has Something for Every Occasion

Lusso bracelets with diamonds in gold, Lusso rings with diamonds in gold, Lusso earring with diamonds in gold, Lustro; dress, Mashael Al-Faris. Photographed by Ali Sharaf
Since being founded in 2008, Lustro has quickly made a name for itself in the regional high jewelry world. Meticulously designed, the Saudi-founded brand’s nine collections promise something for everyone and every occasion.
Stellarosa necklace with diamonds in gold, Stellarosa bracelet with diamonds in gold, Stellarosa rings with diamonds in gold, Stellarosa earrings with diamonds in gold, Lustro; dress, M Gallery. Photographed by Ali Sharaf
For those looking to stand out, the Stellarosa collection features a “super cut” that creates a unique, enhanced reflection on the diamonds. The array of curved diamonds on each piece of jewelry makes it a must for the trendsetter. The latest Coda Di Leone collection, with six different colored stones, is marked with a lion’s tail to symbolize nature and power. Rose gold, diamonds, and malachite are just some of the key elements of this dynamic collection. Meanwhile, Lancia represents confidence and strength for the modern woman, and the Lust collection with its rose gold hues complementing diamonds will speak to your femininity. A collection you can’t go wrong with is the Sera, which is Lustro’s most sought-after one. Also noteworthy are Bling and Lusso, which combine contemporary twists with masterful craftsmanship, and the Bridal and High Jewelry collections for the most special occasions. The Bridal collection offers handcrafted, one-of-a-kind pieces for every bride, while the High Jewelry collection incorporates solitaires and gemstones to create bold pieces that are bound to turn heads.
Coda di Leone necklaces with diamonds and malachite, Coda di Leone bracelets with diamond and malachite, Coda di Leone rings with diamonds and malachite, Coda di Leone earrings with diamond and malachite, Lustro; jumpsuit, Plenty SA. Photography Ali Sharaf
The label aims to revolutionize the traditional concept of jewelry designs and customer service through its unique pieces with sparkling diamonds. To that end, every Lustro boutique offers a tailor-made experience for its clients, while rigorous processes are undertaken by experts to ensure that each diamond is clear, colorless, and of high quality. Up next, the label plans on delivering its handcrafted customer experience internationally with branches in London, Kuwait, and Dubai.
Coda di Leone necklaces with diamonds and malachite, Coda di Leone bracelets with diamond and malachite, Coda di Leone rings with diamonds and malachite, Coda di Leone earrings with diamond and malachite, Lustro; jumpsuit, Plenty SA. Photographed by Ali Sharaf
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Style: Nouf MallawiHair: Guncha AtdyyevaMakeup: Hessa AlajajiModel: Samira Alkhamis

Saudi Designer Daneh Buahmad Celebrates a Decade Since Her Brand’s Launch

Saudi Designer Daneh Buahmad Celebrates a Decade Since Her Brand’s Launch

Celebrating a decade since her brand’s launch, the Saudi designer reflects on coming into her own.
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
A modern muse
This year marks a decade milestone for Saudi designer Daneh Buahmad who launched her label Daneh back in 2011. With a focus on comfort, Buahmad is known for her contemporary tailoring, draping, and timeless silhouettes that draw inspiration from men’s thobes. “When I’m designing, the Daneh woman is in my head. She is the woman who is making a difference, achieving her goals, standing up for herself, and has a presence. And that should be every woman,” asserts the designer. Buahmad approaches her craft with a mindset to enable women to feel good, confident, and polished. “It makes me happy when I see any woman wearing my designs, and even happier when I get notes from my customers about compliments they received,” notes Buahmad, whose pieces have been worn by Queen Rania and Melissa McCarthy. As well as a degree in interactive media and a career in IT, Buahmad took courses at Central Saint Martins alongside completing her master’s in London. “My corporate career is a part of me, and fashion design feeds a part of my soul that IT can’t, and I’m happy to be involved in both right now,” she says. Buahmad’s entrepreneurial spirit and sharp eye for sourcing fabrics run through her blood. “My grandmother was a small business owner in fabrics,” she shares. “Her store was full of imported textiles. I used to love seeing all the rolls.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Setting the mood
In her studio, Buahmad finds energy through music. “It’s a big part of my life and I love all kinds of music,” she says. Depending on her mood, she switches between the smooth vocals of Jorja Smith and soulful sounds of Algerian band Tinariwen to Pablo Alborán and songs from the Hamilton soundtrack. Her latest mood board is linked to American singer Donna Summer. “I attended a small wedding when I was young. It started out normal with negazi music that suddenly stopped, and disco started playing,” she reminisces with laughter. “I’m working on something that is more focused on my heritage, specifically from the eastern province of Saudi Arabia– a statement piece that tells my story.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Relaxed elegance
Buahmad’s personal style speaks volumes. “I like things oversized – white boyfriend shirts and quirky pieces. I’m a sucker for statement boots and sneakers,” she says. “I’m either super casual or dressed up; there’s no room for in-between.” By day, you’ll find her in R13 and Acne Studios tops paired with Moussy and Levi’s jeans. Adding a sentimental touch to her look, Buahmad pulls her mother’s gold chain metal bag and a brown leather belt from the Seventies that belonged to father. Her repertoire of eveningwear is dramatic, uplifting, and bold. “I love pieces by Vivienne Westwood, Maison Margiela, and Junya Watanabe – they are investments and will always stand out. I also have a black dress I’ve owned for more than 10 years that I’m still excited to wear.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Scent profile
While scents can take you back to a specific time, sometimes it’s a striking perfume bottle that evokes nostalgia. “I used to love them when I was a kid; Chanel No.5 and this large Nina Ricci bottle with two doves in my mother’s room,” says Buahmad. Today, her vanity mainstays are Le Labo Noir 29, which was first gifted to her by a friend, and Christian Dior Ambre Nuit.
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Finding Zen
Buahmad is a firm believer in an early morning routine to set the tone for the rest of her day. “I wake up early and try to take time for myself before I jump into work mode. I’ve broken the habit of checking my phone and emails first thing,” she says. “I have some rituals like going to the beach for an hour just to get that energy from the sea,” says the Dubai-based designer. For a refreshing energy boost, Buahmad turns to yin and kundalini yoga. “I like the challenging workout element of it, as well as the calming effect,” she explains. She also finds calmness through shamanic breathwork. “I got into it pre-pandemic. Unfortunately, online sessions didn’t work as well with me, so I’m waiting to go back to big groups as the energy is amazing,” she says.
Green thumb
To find solace, Buahmad retreats to her garden. “It’s personal, I have many memories of gatherings in it, and I’ve watched my plants grow and flourish over time,” she says. Bursting with pink bougainvillea, hibiscus, and fragrant gardenia, her garden is not only an escape where Buahmad finds calm and clarity, it’s also where tends to her vegetable beds. “I’m still an amateur,” she says with a smile. “I have tomatoes, eggplants, melons, cucumbers, and chilis, as well as rosemary, mint, and basil. I have my moments when life feels challenging, but when that happens, I sit back and look around me, at my son, my house, and my garden,” she explains about reflecting in her peaceful oasis. “I think of my family and friends, I think of where I currently am in life, and that as stressful as some phases are or will be, I remind myself that I’m still here and everything will work out.”
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Hair and mekup: Mirna Abdullah

Saudi Arabia’s Fashion Futures to Host Live and Virtual Events in New York and Riyadh

Saudi Arabia’s Fashion Futures to Host Live and Virtual Events in New York and Riyadh

Her Highness Princess Noura bint Faisal Al Saud – Advisor at the Ministry of Culture’s opening address at Fashion Futures 2019 in Riyadh. Photo: Ministry of Culture
Saudi Arabia‘s flagship and first-ever dedicated fashion event, Fashion Futures, is going digital. Supporting the creation of a fashion ecosystem in the country and globally, its first event “Fashion Futures: Moving Towards Sustainability, Diversity & Innovation,” will take place on June 17, 2021. The initiative is taken by the Fashion Commission, which was launched by the Ministry of Culture to lead the Kingdom’s fashion sector, preserve its fashion heritage and promote local designers.
The hybrid-format event will unite leaders in the fashion industry, along with sustainability experts, conservationists, and entrepreneurs, enabling speakers and audiences globally to join through an interactive virtual platform. The program, broadcast live from New York and Riyadh, is in collaboration with Fashinnovation, a global platform focused on sustainability, innovation and entrepreneurship in fashion.
Photo: Ministry of Culture
Some speakers on the panel are Susan Rockefeller, Chair & Trustee of nonprofit ocean conservation organization Oceana, and Rebecca Minkoff, designer and author of upcoming book, Fearless. Accompanying them, Oskar Metsavaht, environmental activist and Amazon guardian, and Abrima Erwiah, co-founder of African fashion house Studio 189, will discuss diversity, Sustainable Development Goals, and innovation in entrepreneurship. Fashinnovation co-founder Jordana Guimaraes will moderate the discussion in New York City, alongside TV presenter and journalist Taghrid Alhowish in Riyadh.
Fashion Commission CEO, Burak Cakmak, says that he is honored to be welcoming some of the world’s greatest business sustainability minds to discuss the most pressing issues faced today. “With no single sector untouched by these issues, virtual platforms like Fashion Futures enable conversations to transgress borders by engaging experts from all over the world in this critical dialogue,” he adds.
Photo: Ministry of Culture
Cakmak believes that Saudi Arabia can be a stellar example of how to build an innovative, sustainable, locally and culturally relevant fashion ecosystem in a country. “Through engaging with innovators across the value chain and partnering to bring education, business development, entrepreneurship and retailing experiences, Saudi Arabia will be able to transform local businesses to achieve the highest standard in their operations and branding that can be celebrated globally,” he says.
In addition to live events, the Fashion Futures platform will offer masterclasses, workshops and training opportunities.
Photo: Ministry of Culture
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Saudi Creatives Lead Fendi’s FF Vertigo Camper Tour in Aseer, Saudi Arabia

Saudi Creatives Lead Fendi’s FF Vertigo Camper Tour in Aseer, Saudi Arabia

Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Italian luxury fashion house Fendi has enlisted Saudi “cool kids” and content creators Tamtam, Lina Malaika, Rawkan Binbella, and Ali Cha’aban to take on the FF Vertigo Camper Tour across the Aseer region in Saudi Arabia. FF Vertigo, Fendi’s Summer 2021 capsule collection in collaboration with New York-based visual artist Sarah Coleman, released on the label’s website and in boutiques worldwide in May this year.

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Set in the untapped landscape of Aseer with its billowy clouds, Red Sea coastline, inland desert, the campaign clip shows the creatives losing themselves in mist-cloaked valleys, wild nature, and mystical breeze, donning accessories and ready-to-wear clothes from the collection.
Read on to know all about the exciting Fendi FF Vertigo KSA Camper Tour.

The travelers
Riyadh-based R&B and pop singer and songwriter Tamtam is a recipient of the National Cultural Award in Saudi Arabia for her grand achievements in music and has numerous milestones and collaborations under her belt. The June 2021 cover star is no stranger to dedicating her projects to social issues and good causes, with her earliest 2015 single We’ve Got Wings promoting a Saudi breast cancer awareness organization founded by princess Reema Bint Bandar, and Gender Game about her journey as a Saudi woman pursuing a music career. In 2019, she performed her song One Earth at the Global Goals World Cup in New York City.
Tamtam. Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Rawkan Binbella is a multi-faceted Saudi artist, and his biggest venture began with his role in the Kingdom’s first commercial feature film Born A King as the young king and founder of Saudi Arabia Abdulaziz. He hasn’t stopped since, branching out as a model, singer, songwriter, and fashion designer, with his stunning clothing line Meoji.
Rawkan Binbella. Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Born and raised in Saudi Arabia, Lina Malaika has established herself as a freelance visionary artist with over a decade of acuity in fashion, film, and graphic design. She is known for craftily portraying Saudi landmarks with a unique, aspirational, and nostalgic touch, always assimilating her deep cultural roots in her photographs and paintings.
Lina Malaika. Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Ali Cha’aban is a Lebanese-Saudi artist born and raised in Kuwait. Arab culture and tradition are the themes often apparent in his work, and with his background in anthropology, he has been proclaimed a pop-culture analyst. Cha’aban’s work revolves around the idea of nostalgia, with which he aims to challenge socio-political issues such as Arab identity and the state of dystopia.
Ali Cha’aban, TamTam and Rawkan Bilbella. Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
The region
The talent-studded campaign brings light to the land of Aseer, the largest area of all-year-round green vegetation in Saudi Arabia. With over 4000 historical villages, Aseer is the Home of Unesco-registered Qatt Art, a form of Arabic artwork incorporating the geometric patterns plastered and painted by women of the region across their homes. It also houses many other forms of bohemian art, with the beautiful little Al Muftaha Village around a mosque covered in calligraphy. Local creativity in this village dates back 260 years, with small galleries showcasing the colorful work of regional craftspeople and artists.
The region boasts vibrant folklore of traditional dances, arts, poetries, and literature. For instance, Flower Men in the village of Rijal Alma, appropriately nicknamed after the floral wreaths and crowns they adorn themselves with, dress in the traditional “fouta” attire, a wraparound skirt with stripes. The Flowerman Festival, a lesser-known Saudi tradition, takes place every year, swanking the fascinating values of the indigenous Aseri tribe that populates the blocky stone buildings in the village.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
The wardrobe
Fendi’s joyful, vintage-like collection celebrates the summer season with sophisticated bags, accessories, and irresistible prêt-à-porter pieces for women, men and children in acidic yellow and vibrant blue tones, fused with retro references that evoke the desire to be at a beach party in Miami in the 90s. Coleman, after her hugely successful partnership with Fendi during Design Miami, joined forces with Menswear Artistic Director Silvia Venturini Fendi to work on FF Vertigo, a new magnetic motif twisting up Fendi’s classic FF logo pattern, and revisited through a 70s psychedelic filter. The intentionally kitschy vibe of the collection is channeled through Coleman’s signature manipulation of designers’ materials that help repurpose everyday objects with an ironic filter.
The new motif is the face of a range of new limited-edition items, designed for the coolest outdoor adventures, such as instant cameras, camping equipment, and backpacks. Fendi also infuses a free-spirited and bold vibe into a range of crochet bag styles, with a gush of glistening sequins or detailed blossoming embroideries.
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Photography: Rayan Nawawi Style: Latifa Bint SaadHair and makeup: Nadine TabbaraCreative Director: Ali Cha’abanCinematography: Asper LucasProducer: Ruby Kreidieh 

Saudi, We Have Arrived! Vogue Arabia is Now Available in Over 250 Stores in the Kingdom

Saudi, We Have Arrived! Vogue Arabia is Now Available in Over 250 Stores in the Kingdom

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Saudi, we have arrived! The Middle East’s most iconic fashion publication has just come a whole closer to its readers in the Kingdom. Saudi fashion and culture enthusiasts can now pick up copies of Vogue Arabia from within the country.
Starting today, Vogue Arabia — alongside the biannual Vogue Man Arabia and Vogue Living Arabia — will be available in over 250 of your favorite bookstores across Al-Ahsa, Al-Kharj, Dammam, Jeddah, Jubail, Mecca, Medina, Qassim, Riyadh, and Taif. This means that whether you are awaiting the interview of your favorite artist, designer or celebrity, or just need your monthly dose of style and beauty, you can count on Vogue Arabia to always be at hand.
Winnie Harlow and Shahad Salman shot by photographer Dan Beleiu for Vogue Arabia June 2019
Since its launch, Vogue Arabia has been at the forefront of championing the immense talent of Saudi Arabia, including traditional artisans, globally renowned designers, and pioneering women in various fields. Strongly believing in representing the region in the best, and most inclusive way possible, many of Vogue Arabia’s key moments have come to life in the Kingdom. Who can forget the groundbreaking inaugural Saudi issue in June 2018, which became the first Vogue edition to be dedicated to the Kingdom?
Saudi models Amira Al Zuhair, Sophie Alshehry, and Domie wearing Amira Al Zuhair. Photographed in NEOM by Txema Yeste for Vogue Arabia December 2020
From the Sadus village to the bustling city of Riyadh, the magazine has traveled all around the country with the help of local, established as well as emerging creatives. Vogue Arabia was also the first publication to bring a top model to the Kingdom as Winnie Harlow fronted our June 2019 issue with rising Saudi model Shahad Salman, and the first to shoot covers at the historic site of Diriyah and the futuristic NEOM.
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Vogue Arabia and Saudi Ministry of Culture to Support Emerging Designers with This New Initiative

Vogue Arabia and Saudi Ministry of Culture to Support Emerging Designers with This New Initiative

Cindy Bruna wears Saudi label Ashi Studio Couture FW20. Photographed by Tom Munro for Vogue Arabia
Bold and forward-thinking, in a move certain to excite Saudi designers, the Fashion Commission of Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Culture today announces the launch of the Saudi 100 Brands program in partnership with Vogue Arabia.
Set to invest manpower in 100 domestic fashion brands, the new, one-year program will also support designers’ global ambitions through mentorship with experts from fashion powerhouses LVMH, Kering, Chanel, Valentino, Swarovski, and Bulgari. “It’s so exciting to launch Saudi 100 Brands as such a rich and diverse opportunity for the talented fashion design community here in KSA,” remarks HH Princess Noura bint Faisal, sector development director of the Fashion Commission. “The fashion commission spent 2020 laying the foundations for an enabled sector and now, in 2021, we’re rolling out this initiative, among others, to ensure our ambitions – which reflect those of our community – are achieved.”
Where the importance of strategic storytelling is at an all-time high, along with media support, Vogue Arabia will help fashion brands to amplify their message, while also sharing knowledge on how best to approach editorial and social media content. “Vogue Arabia has a long history of nurturing emerging regional brands and partnering with the Saudi 100 Brands program is a natural continuation of our support,” states editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut. “We are excited to work closely with the Saudi Fashion Commission, sharing insights that will contribute to the development of the brands taking part in this journey, and using our platforms to support their growth not only locally but also on a global scale.”
HH Princess Noura bint Faisal, sector development director of the Fashion Commission. Courtesy of Saudi 100 Brands
Branding, conceptualization, sales performance strategy, public relations and marketing, client identification, innovation and technology, and key leadership skills will be offered via virtual and in-person training workshops to help boost competitive business advantage for Saudi brands in the global fashion world. Along with guidance from luxury experts, professors from Central Saint Martins, the Royal College of Art, Yale, and Parsons will also partake in the designers’ mentorship journey. “Saudi Arabia is on a growth path across all sectors, including fashion, and there are great opportunities for local entrepreneurs to build new businesses across all parts of the fashion value chain,” says Burak Cakmak, CEO of the Fashion Commission. “A robust fashion sector benefits from local creatives, design studios, marketing and communication agencies, manufacturers, and retailers. And through programs like Saudi 100 Brands, we look forward to seeing Saudi designers take their rightful place on the global stage.”
For several years, Vogue Arabia has pioneered initiatives with the aim to bring Saudi’s rich history to the international stage through its content. It is the world’s first magazine to launch an annual issue entirely dedicated to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia – the June 2018 edition – bringing international attention to its diverse fashions, cultures, landscapes, and social evolution. The following year, it brought supermodel Winnie Harlow to Saudi for a cover shoot in Riyadh with local talent Shahad Salman, with the issue receiving international recognition and being featured on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. In 2020, Vogue Arabia unlocked the door to some of the most meaningful venues of the Kingdom, with a five-cover special edition photographed for the first time at NEOM, and Diriyah. In the latter location, Vogue featured women in traditional Saudi dress from its various provinces by female photographer Hayat Osamah, curated by Dr Layla AlBassam.
Along with the training and shared knowledge, Saudi 100 Brands will offer retail platforms and consumer-directed activities with the purpose of encouraging sales in the market. The first will be in Riyadh in December 2021, with Vogue Arabia also supporting, as a natural extension of the backing of emerging talent and other Vogue campaigns such as the annual fashion prize and the ongoing #buyArabdesigners campaign. E-sales outlets and a wholesale campaign, launching early 2022, will encourage international sales. The Fashion Commission partners with Vogue Arabia and regional retailers to accomplish this and more. These retailers will partake in virtual conferences, provide professional training, and will also offer dedicated in-store space for exclusive Ramadan pop-up initiatives in March 2022. Through the acquisition of some of the Saudi 100 Brands products, retailers will support wholesale resort campaign sales across major fashion cities. Through this pioneering initiative, Saudi brands will be elevated at home and abroad, and will contribute to fashion’s diverse, international mosaic, while bringing to the forefront its inimitable edge.
Saudi brands that wish to participate are invited by the Fashion Commission to register through its e-platform Saudi100brands.com from Thursday, June 3 – Sunday, June 20, 2021.
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Looking Back on Vogue Arabia’s Previous Saudi Issues and Their Landmark Achievements

Looking Back on Vogue Arabia’s Previous Saudi Issues and Their Landmark Achievements

Photographed by Txema Yeste for Vogue Arabia December 2020
Shortly after its first anniversary, Vogue Arabia made history by becoming the first-ever Vogue edition dedicated to Saudi Arabia. The June 2018 issue starring HRH Hayfa bint Abdullah Al Saud had been the first of many annual editions to come that would celebrate and spotlight the immense talent of the Kingdom.
As the region gears up for the reveal of Vogue Arabia’s latest Saudi Issue, we look back on the previous editions and their landmark achievements.

June 2018, starring HRH Hayfa bint Abdullah Al Saud
Photographed by Boo George for Vogue Arabia’s June 2018 issue
One of the publication’s most groundbreaking covers, and the first-ever Vogue edition dedicated to Saudi Arabia, it pictured HRH Hayfa bint Abdullah Al Saud in the driving seat during the month when Saudi lifted the driving ban on women. The artist and princess was shot by photographer Boo George in the desert outside Jeddah, marking the debut magazine cover for the daughter of the late King Abdullah.
“People often ask me what made me want to be on the cover of Vogue,” said HRH reflecting on the cover a year later. “There were two significant reasons that compelled me to accept the invitation. Firstly, I am a Saudi female artist, and Vogue Arabia is a prominent, well-established media brand with a wide reach. I am excited about the work I’m doing, and I saw it as a great opportunity to celebrate and share my paintings with an audience that is already familiar with me as a public figure within my country. Secondly, the specific edition of the magazine was exclusively focused on Saudi Arabia. Given my strong sense of patriotism and allegiance to my homeland, I felt that the timing was right to be involved in an exciting publication celebrating the Kingdom.”
June 2019, starring Winnie Harlow and Shahad Salman
Winnie Harlow and Shahad Salman shot by photographer Dan Beleiu and styled by Katie Trotter
In yet another world exclusive, Vogue Arabia flew top international model Winnie Harlow to Saudi Arabia, where she modeled alongside rising star Shahad Salman for the June issue, themed “women standing for women.” Photographed by Dan Beleiu in Riyadh’s Sadus heritage village, cover stars Harlow, from Canada, and Salman, from the Kingdom, shared their touching stories of success, notably pointing out how vitiligo – a skin condition caused by the lack of melanin – hasn’t stopped them from achieving their dreams.

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It didn’t take long for the distinctive cover shot in Saudi Arabia to grab global attention as it appeared on one of the biggest TV shows in the US. When Harlow appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, in September 2019, the television host took the opportunity to discuss her work with the magazine. “I thought this was a cool thing. You’re on the cover of Vogue Arabia,” said Fallon. Harlow proudly chimed in to discuss the shoot, saying, “That’s my first Vogue. This is the beautiful Shahad, she is gorgeous. I really wanted to do something powerful for my first cover with Vogue Arabia. I’m really close with the people behind the scenes there. We’d been having discussions for about a year about what would be really powerful and we found her on Instagram, and she’s a friend of mine.”
December 2020, starring five young Saudi women, next star Saudi models, and couturier Ashi with muse and model Cindy Bruna

The December 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia celebrated the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with a five-cover special edition dedicated to the country and its people. For the first cover, the special project was lensed by Hayat Osamah and curated by historian Dr Layla AlBassam. It stars five young Saudi women from across the country dressed in their respective regional dress. The calligraphy reads, “In the heart of Saudi.” In brilliant contrast, the second cover draws the eye to the next star Saudi models, shot by photographer Txema Yeste with surrealist effect against the smart city of NEOM. International Saudi couturier Ashi, who has dressed Beyoncé, Cardi B, and Billy Porter, is also featured on a cover alongside model and Ashi muse Cindy Bruna.
HRH Princess Reema bint Bandar bin Sultan bin Abdulaziz Al Saud photographed by her daughter, Princess Sarah bint Faisal Al Saud
The issue also included an exclusive feature by Saudi ambassador to the US, HRH Princess Reema bint Bandar bin Sultan bin Abdulaziz Al Saud. Photographed for Vogue Arabia by her daughter, Princess Sarah bint Faisal Al Saud, she penned a letter to Saudi women, stating, “Whatever the future holds for the Kingdom, young Saudi women will be at the front of the line, integral to the process of shaping it. And that means, very soon, we will no longer refer to the ‘first’ Saudi women this or the ‘first’ Saudi woman that – because the presence and contribution of Saudi women in every job, occupation, career, and sector will simply be commonplace and unremarkable.” Princess Reema added, “The time has come to be judged by our capabilities and accomplishments and not by our gender.”
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How Piaget is Supporting the Artisanal Talent of Saudi Arabia’s Future Generations

How Piaget is Supporting the Artisanal Talent of Saudi Arabia’s Future Generations

Photo: Courtesy of Piaget
In celebration of Ramadan, Swiss jeweler Piaget has released a new campaign in the form of a short film. Titled Turn for the Extraordinary the film in collaboration with the Royal Commission For Al Ula unveils Piaget’s Possessions collection in Saudi Arabia’s first Unesco world heritage site. The collaboration also marks the opening of Piaget’s two new boutiques in Saudi Arabia, Faisaliah Mall in Riyadh and Khayyat Mall in Jeddah.
Captured in the historic land of Al Ula, the campaign’s story unfolds as the protagonist travels back and forth from her own reality and the heritage site, all the while brushing on notions of self-reflection, inspiration, and love. The Possessions collections seen in the video features an array of precious stones from malachite, carnelian, to turquoise stones, each telling their tale of the concept of time as they are deeply rooted in the history and culture of Piaget.
Photo: Courtesy of Piaget
What’s more, Piaget is putting itself at the forefront of championing the artisans’ talent of Saudi Arabia’s future generations. Highlighting the importance of mentorship and sustainability, Piaget has launched the Craftsmanship Scholarship Program and the Piaget competition in partnership with Geneva University of Arts and Design and Turquoise Mountain.
“In making a turn for the extraordinary, Piaget has partnered with the Royal Commission for AlUla to demonstrate the brand’s mission to preserve heritage by developing the artisanal talent of Saudi Arabia’s future generation and sustainability through the craftsmanship scholarship program,” shares Piaget’s CEO Chabi Nouri with Vogue Arabia. She adds, “The Piaget competition is in partnership with Geneva University of Art and Design to mentor Turquoise mountain school in AlUla in supporting the local community by mentoring 12 girls in creating an inspirational piece from the region’s rich history.”
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Chopard’s New Boutique in Saudi Arabia Will Make You Feel at Home with Fine Jewelry

Chopard’s New Boutique in Saudi Arabia Will Make You Feel at Home with Fine Jewelry

Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
Chopard has opened the doors to its new boutique in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia at Al Basateen Mall, in partnership with Attar United.  Designed by renowned French architect Thierry W. Despont, the boutique is adorned with opulent leathers, light-toned woods, and deep red velvet interiors. Ever wanted to peruse fine jewelry and luxury watches from the comfort of home? The boutique will allow you to do just that as its design aims to put clients at ease by recreating the ambiance of a private residence.
Megan Thee Stallion wears Chopard jewelry to the Grammy Awards. Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
Once inside, clients are invited to stroll around the boutique as they browse the celebrity-loved maison‘s creations. Chopard jewels recently stole the show at this year’s Grammy Awards when Megan Thee Stallion made an appearance in five pieces from the maison. The rapper topped the event’s best-dressed lists with help from a diamond necklace from Chopard’s Red Carpet collection, a diamond bracelet from the Green Carpet collection, another from the Haute Joaillerie collection, and a brilliant-cut diamond ring from the Magical Setting collection.
Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
Karl-Friedrich Scheufele, co-president of Chopard commented on the opening, “In line with the brand’s expansion strategy, we are pleased to open our first boutique in Jeddah in partnership with Attar United.” CEO of Attar United Company, Mohammed Saddik Attar said, “We are proud to launch this new and first Chopard boutique in Jeddah which promises to be the best luxury shopping destination, we welcome our guests to explore the best shopping experience and Chopard’ s finest jewelry and watches”.
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These Designers are Giving Saudi Women Identity Ownership By Reinventing the Abaya

These Designers are Giving Saudi Women Identity Ownership By Reinventing the Abaya

The abaya remains the ultimate garment for women across the Middle East, with Saudi creatives breathing new life into its threads. As Vogue Arabia partners with Saudi Tourism Authority in our fourth anniversary issue dedicated to creativity, we highlight the female designers behind the Kingdom’s leading abaya brands.
Nour Kouatli in Orange Blossom X Nouklier. Photo: Lina Mo
The sweeping black garment – the abaya – is rumored to have its origins date back 4,000 years, to ancient Mesopotamia, or the present-day Arabian Peninsula. Here, amid rugged dwellings, girls and women went about their day’s tasks, which consisted above all, to maintain their family and elders, all the while dressed in a sweeping black cloth. The abaya would skim the ground as they walked and billow in the arid winds. If today’s changes to the abaya may be considered avant garde by some, the Middle Eastern woman’s role in society is more affirmed than ever and her clothing serves as a great revelator. Her abaya proves to be a constant in her young adult life through to the age of wisdom. Now, her garment choices may dictate color and embellishment with the purpose of revealing her personality but never her body, which, like her mind and spirit, is always dignified.
Sarah Basaad in Moja Majka. Photo: Lina Mo
If the loose robe carries such history, in pre-Islamic times, its initial purpose was most likely to denote an esteemed social status. And while it has remained as such over centuries, as women’s eminence has become increasingly prominent, the abaya has also returned to its roots, serving as both a symbol of modesty and style. Sarah Basaad of Saudi abaya brand Moja Majka reflects that when thinking about the abaya when designing, she always tries to transform any preconceived notions of suppression into ones of emancipation and autonomy. “It’s a personal interpretation of our culture and heritage,” she shares. Over decades, she explains, abayas “transformed into a way of expression that bring color, flow, and freedom to women who wear them.”
Sarah Basaad (left) and Asmaa Alturk in Moja Majka. Photo: Lina Mo
That regional fashion houses and Arab Muslim women today are creatively inspired to evolve the abaya only serves as proof of a woman’s undying devotion to this ancient garment. In a country brimming with changes to its social structure, it is both expected and welcomed that such a garment, reflective of society, evolves too. Saudi designers in particular are taking the reins, approaching the abaya as a canvas and a way of outward expression. This isn’t necessarily unique to this century, albeit with time, creative exercises have become more refined with an emphasis on local craft, embroideries, and traditional beading techniques.
In the Eighties, the shoulder abaya, featuring full sleeves, covered the entire body while crepe, chiffon, and silk fabrics saw it transform into a breathable and lightweight form of dress. This was one of the earlier steps in evolving the garment. Come the turn of the millennium and experimentation with the abaya flirted with excess, recalling superfluous styles of the Eighties’ West. The last decade has seen a happy marriage between individualism and taste.
Safaa Alireza (left) and Malaak Almaimouni in Baya. Photo: Lina Mo
Perhaps it is the abaya’s air of mystery that contributes to its sartorial permanence. It is even going beyond craftsmanship to court tech. Riyadh-based Torba Studio designers Nazek AlKhulaifi and Sarah AlAmeel offer an experimental approach to their designs, inspired by the “billowing darkness of the night.” Streetwear abayas are embellished with glow-in-the-dark material and cosmic prints. “We take inspiration from the mystery and philosophy of the unknown,” they share, adding that their niqab visuals express a core value. It was up until only a few years ago that abayas of color offered inspired choices to women who no longer wished to blend in amid a sea of black fabric. So beguiling are the contemporary modern designs that for some decades they have started permeating other cultures and far-reaching locations such as the West. Specializing in abayas and traditional Arab dress, Chador, based in Riyadh and driven by designer Nora Aldamer, a Parsons School of Design in New York graduate, is one of the leading Saudi contemporary abaya brands today. Staples of the label see the abaya silhouette even reaching outerwear. To wit; cashmere ponchos, vests, and maxi trench coats with utilitarian accouterments see a joining of cultures where both a jet-set Middle Eastern and a Western woman can meet at a crossroad of elegance and modesty.
Zeina Adra (left) and Nour Kelani in their Orange Blossom a Nouklier collaboration. Photo: Lina Mo
Liberty, self-expression, independence, and self-determination are the ideas that drive female designers behind today’s leading abaya brands throughout the Kingdom. At Orange Blossom, which is collaborating with clothing brand Noukliér on a collection inspired by English aristocrat Jane Digby (who spent her final years in Damascus), its vision is to modernize the abaya to cover both modesty and practicality to fit the lifestyle of the modern working Saudi woman. Gone is the black abaya; here, color reigns with blazing burnt oranges, shocking pinks, mustard yellows, and lavender purples recalling the rose-filled hills of Taif. Babushka Store’s Alaa Al Jefri considers abayas not just an essential item in a Saudi woman’s wardrobe but that it is “the one piece that says it all. Your style, mood, and your personality.” Meanwhile, at abaya fashion brand Baya in Jeddah, founder Safaa Alireza creates versatile, conscious abayas for coastal journeys with cotton, rayon, and crinkle fabric ideal for the warm climates across the country but especially for a weekend at Al-Ahsa Oasis or Umluj.
Alaa Al Jefri in Babushka. Photo: Lina Mo
Women the world over are entranced by the abaya’s aura. Particularly when in movement, its lightweight cloth rises to swell and swirl in the wind, just as it most likely did 4 000 years ago. Like a compelling sillage, that trail of notes left behind an exceptionally perfumed woman, the impression a handcrafted abaya leaves remains long after it is out of sight.
Read Next: 10 Abayas for Effortlessly Cool Summer Style
Photography: Lina MoHair: Aisha AlnajjarMakeup: Safaa AlirezaPhotography assistant: Bashayer Al-AmriProduction: Zanica Zivkovic

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