Riyadh

Discover Chaumet’s Tiaras Like Never Before at the Tiara Dream Exhibition in Riyadh

Discover Chaumet’s Tiaras Like Never Before at the Tiara Dream Exhibition in Riyadh

Chaumet presents Tiara Dream, the Middle East’s first patrimonial exhibition uncovering the tiara as both a symbol of prestige and a precious fashion accessory – and an eternal link to love.
Joséphine Valse Impériale tiara in white gold with diamonds, Joséphine Aigrette Impériale ring in platinum with diamonds, Chaumet; dress, Manaal Al Hammadi
Dentelle de Lumière tiara in white gold with diamonds, Chaumet; dress, Azzi & Osta
Tiaras are often the popular choice for family heirlooms in ruling families, mainly for their perpetual opulence and grandeur, and since 1780, French jeweler Chaumet’s tiaras have proven to always stand against the test of decades of fleeting fashion trends, catering to the most glamorous sovereigns, rulers, and emperors. Chaumet’s original muse for much of their designs throughout history, Empress Josephine, wife of French emperor Napoleon, turned constantly to the jewelry house or her beguiling looks. A woman who was as alluring as she was powerful, the empress trusted no one but Chaumet to embody her persona seamlessly.
Torsade De Chaumet Tiara win white gold with diamonds, Chaumet; dress, Dolce & Gabbana
Firmament de Minuit tiara in white gold with diamonds, Chaumet; dress, Shatha Essa
An emblem of prestige, elegance and timelessness, the House of Chaumet now presents us with Tiara Dream, the Middle East’s first patrimonial exhibition where a collection of tiaras will be available for viewing this month in Riyadh. Under the themes of Immersion, Unity, Power of the Past, Power of Today, Fashion, Eternity, Love, and Virtuosity, each of the dreamy tiaras in the exhibition demand attention towards their wearer, exuding an aura of elegance that will never fade over time. Bringing together elements like white gold, diamonds, and Colombian emeralds, the exhibit will include pieces like the Torsade de Chaumet tiara, the Firmament De Minuit and the Josephine Valse Imperiale this March.
Tiara Dream exhibition will take place at the King Fahad National Library, Riyadh, from March 16 to 26. Free entry; open to the public by reservation. 
Firmament de Minuit tiara in white gold with diamonds, Chaumet;
Torsade de Chaumet tiara in white gold with Vivid Green emerald and diamonds, Chaumet; dress, Eman Alajlan
Read Next: Is the Chaumet Tiara the Ultimate Accessory?
Photography: Philipp JelenskaStyle: Mohammad Hazem RezqMakeup: Eilaf SabbaghHair: Mona AliProduction: Danica ZivkovicLocal producer: Mustafa AlamasiModel: Amira Al Zuhair at Elite Model ParisPhotography assistant: Sultan MutradStyle assistant: Shaimaa HabbalProduction assistant: Rama Naser

Nadine Nassib Njeim’s Backless Black Gown From the 2022 Joy Awards Is for Every Woman Who Loves a Little Drama

Nadine Nassib Njeim’s Backless Black Gown From the 2022 Joy Awards Is for Every Woman Who Loves a Little Drama

Nadine Nassib Njeim at the 2022 Joy Awards. Photo: Instagram.com
On the evening of January 27, the stars descended on Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on occasion of the 2022 Joy Awards. Hosted under the patronship of of Turki Al Sheikh, the Royal Court and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the General Authority for Entertainment, the awards ceremony was attended by some of the most-loved stars of the Arab world, all of whom brought their sartorial A-game to the purple carpet. Among the most interesting looks of the evening was that of Lebanese actor Nadine Nassib Njeim, who sauntered in dressed in an elegant black gown that may seem simple at first sight, but was, in reality, anything but. Keep reading to find out what made it such a unique pick.

Nadine Nassib Njeim’s gown came with a crystal studded open back
Nadine Nassib Njeim’s gown came with a crystal-detailed open back. Photo: Instagram.com
Seemingly crafted in black velvet, Nadine Nassib Njeim’s gown was created by Beirut-based label Aden Fashion. The full-sleeved, body-hugging number came with a delicate string of crystals along its modest neckline and sleeve hems. The star detail of Njeim’s look, however, was its risqué low back, which was adorned with multiple rows of dangling crystals. To allow the statement back of her gown to take centre stage, the actor styled her hair in a romantic half-up, half-down do, and pulled her chestnut waves to the front. To match with the embellishment on her ebony gown, Nadine Nassib Njeim opted for a black Jimmy Choo clutch with its own crystal work, along with matching Aquazzura heels.
Nadine Nassib Njeim paired her gown with emerald and diamond jewelry. Photo: Instagram.com
No awards look is complete without the right jewelry, and with her slinky gown, Njeim opted for stunning emerald and diamond earrings from Lebanese jewelry house Tufenkjian. She also added on a gorgeous ring for the evening.
If you thought black was basic, Nadine Nassib Njeim’s ensemble from the Joy Awards will definitely change your mind. Are you bold enough to wear a backless gown like hers?

Nancy Ajram Performed at Riyadh’s 2022 Joy Awards in a Glittering Gold Alexandre Vauthier Gown

Nancy Ajram Performed at Riyadh’s 2022 Joy Awards in a Glittering Gold Alexandre Vauthier Gown

Nancy Ajram walks in at the Joy Awards 2022. Photo: Instagram.com
Last night, Riyadh lit up for one of its biggest celebrations of the year, the 2022 edition of the Joy Awards, which were hosted as part of the entertainment events of the Riyadh season 2021. Held under the tutelage of Turki Al Sheikh, the Royal Court and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the General Authority for Entertainment, the special night celebrated the work of the Arab world’s biggest stars in the fields of acting, artistic works and music, and was attended by a series of noteworthy celebrities from the region. The red carpet saw several public figures, including Nancy Ajram, Nelly Karim, Tara Ahlam, Nadine Nassib Njeim, Assala, Wafaa Al Kilani, Donia Samir Ghanem, Amina Khalil, and Dina El-Sherbiny, among many others. And it comes as no surprise that the stars went all-out with their attire for the evening.
Among the best dressed celebrities at the 2022 Joy Awards was Lebanese musician Nancy Ajram, who not only performed on stage, but also won the award for best song for her track ‘Salamat’. The much-loved music mogul attended the event in a sparkling gold gown by Alexandre Vauthier, which is a must-see for anyone who loves statement-making ensembles. Check it out below.
Nancy Ajram accepts her award in Riyadh. Photo: Instagram.com
Nancy Ajram complemented her figure-hugging gold gown with earthy makeup
If you follow Nancy Ajram on social media, you may already know that the singer loves wrap-around silhouettes. After being seen in a draped ivory dress this January, and a figure-hugging red jumpsuit back in December 2021, Ajram walked out in Riyadh last night in a body-hugging gold maxi gown by Alexandre Vauthier that cinched in at the middle in and created elegant drapes down the front. The musician’s gown also came with long sleeves and a plunging neckline for added drama.
Nancy Ajram in Alexandre Vauthier. Photo: Instagram.com
To complete her Joy Awards look, Ajram paired the sparkling gown with elegant strappy gold heels, and went with a beauty look she can’t seem to get enough of—perfectly bronzed out skin, a soft brown smoky eye, and creamy caramel lips. Tousled honey waves and a midnight manicure finished her look. As a final touch, the star added on a pair of chunky gold earrings before stepping out in Saudi Arabia.
Nancy Ajram’s makeup was done in warm, earthy tones. Photo: Instagram.com

If you’re planning a big soireé this month, a gilded gown like Nancy Ajram’s is one you can’t go wrong with. Not only will it keep you warm, it’s also bound to earn you lots of compliments.

Saudi Arabia’s Fashion Futures to Host Live and Virtual Events in New York and Riyadh

Saudi Arabia’s Fashion Futures to Host Live and Virtual Events in New York and Riyadh

Her Highness Princess Noura bint Faisal Al Saud – Advisor at the Ministry of Culture’s opening address at Fashion Futures 2019 in Riyadh. Photo: Ministry of Culture
Saudi Arabia‘s flagship and first-ever dedicated fashion event, Fashion Futures, is going digital. Supporting the creation of a fashion ecosystem in the country and globally, its first event “Fashion Futures: Moving Towards Sustainability, Diversity & Innovation,” will take place on June 17, 2021. The initiative is taken by the Fashion Commission, which was launched by the Ministry of Culture to lead the Kingdom’s fashion sector, preserve its fashion heritage and promote local designers.
The hybrid-format event will unite leaders in the fashion industry, along with sustainability experts, conservationists, and entrepreneurs, enabling speakers and audiences globally to join through an interactive virtual platform. The program, broadcast live from New York and Riyadh, is in collaboration with Fashinnovation, a global platform focused on sustainability, innovation and entrepreneurship in fashion.
Photo: Ministry of Culture
Some speakers on the panel are Susan Rockefeller, Chair & Trustee of nonprofit ocean conservation organization Oceana, and Rebecca Minkoff, designer and author of upcoming book, Fearless. Accompanying them, Oskar Metsavaht, environmental activist and Amazon guardian, and Abrima Erwiah, co-founder of African fashion house Studio 189, will discuss diversity, Sustainable Development Goals, and innovation in entrepreneurship. Fashinnovation co-founder Jordana Guimaraes will moderate the discussion in New York City, alongside TV presenter and journalist Taghrid Alhowish in Riyadh.
Fashion Commission CEO, Burak Cakmak, says that he is honored to be welcoming some of the world’s greatest business sustainability minds to discuss the most pressing issues faced today. “With no single sector untouched by these issues, virtual platforms like Fashion Futures enable conversations to transgress borders by engaging experts from all over the world in this critical dialogue,” he adds.
Photo: Ministry of Culture
Cakmak believes that Saudi Arabia can be a stellar example of how to build an innovative, sustainable, locally and culturally relevant fashion ecosystem in a country. “Through engaging with innovators across the value chain and partnering to bring education, business development, entrepreneurship and retailing experiences, Saudi Arabia will be able to transform local businesses to achieve the highest standard in their operations and branding that can be celebrated globally,” he says.
In addition to live events, the Fashion Futures platform will offer masterclasses, workshops and training opportunities.
Photo: Ministry of Culture
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How the Abaya is Giving Saudi Women Identity Ownership

How the Abaya is Giving Saudi Women Identity Ownership

>As the abaya experiences a coming of age, more women are exploring ownership of identity.
Photography: Vivienne Balla

There’s more to abayas than meets the eye – the very eyes men have been instructed to avert from the silky black surfaces of these loose garments to avoid temptation. But today, Saudi women are more visible than ever, opting for a presence that reveals what lies beneath – their true colors. To avoid them is as futile an exercise as is covering the sun with the palm of one’s hand. In the sprawling concrete jungles of Riyadh and Jeddah, the abaya is experiencing a rebirth, while in smaller pockets of the Kingdom, some women are lamenting the loss of tradition.
Donna AlSudairy, a Jeddah-based writer, still finds it difficult to reconcile the big shifts in women’s public sartorial choices. “Just three years ago, I would stick to black and navy. I wasn’t comfortable standing out,” she notes. It was only when she went shopping with an Australian friend that AlSudairy noticed the new social contract, to which she found herself repeatedly exclaiming, “No way can I do that!” Egged on by her friend, she eventually settled for a blue overlay. Today, AlSudairy wears midcalf abayas, and has one for each occasion: a business abaya, a night-out abaya, and a beach one, too.
Serb

The abaya as a statement piece is perhaps best reflected in the gradual sweeping of the kimono/trenchcoat-turned- abaya trend; a guiding principle for many designers who want to stay relevant. Beachbaya, a brand out of Jeddah, offers loose-fitting floral cover-ups in bright hues. Its Instagram account, easily mistaken for portraying a balmy Bali beachscape, features sun-kissed Saudi models in neon chandelier earrings with boyfriend jeans peeking underneath the draping cloaks. Taking cues from the landscape is not a phenomenon exclusive to the picturesque views of the West coast. In the Saudi capital, an ambitious, big-city nightlife feel influences brands. Torba Studio takes a more experimental, futurist approach. Launched by two college friends, Nazek AlKhulaifi and Sarah AlAmeel, it’s inspired by the billowing darkness of the night and a yearning for another planet. With galactic imageries, the studio’s disruptive streetwear abayas are capsules to the moon, embellished with glow-in- the-dark material and cosmic prints. “We take inspiration from the mystery and philosophy of the unknown. Modest wear is always preppy and clean-cut, so we wanted something edgy,” says AlKhulaifi, who insists that niqab visuals in their branding don’t parody or subjugate women. Instead, they communicate a core value. When nighttime befalls the Riyadh sky, everyone blends in and becomes anonymous.
Rooted more in the present is Farah Aziz, a former diplomat who lives alone in the city. Like a lot of Saudi women, she is going through her journey of weaning off the abaya after Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman stated in 2018 that they were not mandatory under Saudi or Islamic law. “I bought a trenchcoat but shied away from stepping out in public,” says Aziz, who limits her creative experimentation to more progressive spaces like the Diplomatic Quarter in Riyadh. “When the breeze brushed my face this one October morning, it felt like I was in New York. I felt very alive.”
An Design

Similarly, Raneen Bukhari, an art consultant based in Los Angeles, has walked a winding road of trial and error since 2011. Pushing the limits of what is permissible, she started with kaftans and maxi dresses that kept getting shorter and shorter. Eventually, she escalated to baggy shirts and pants, until she was once barred from entering an Eastern Province mall. “Even though I was ready to get in trouble, no one ultimately cared enough,” explains Bukhari, who seems to have always been in the right place at the right time – other women weren’t as lucky to slip under the radar.
One such example is Fatimah, whose professional aspirations drove her to exchange Al-Qassim for the capital, where she currently lives alone, much to her conservative family’s dismay. “My parents don’t go out much but they see the changes via social media and they aren’t too comfortable,” she shares. “But they know better than to say much in front of me because I clap back.” While adamant about leading a life that follows her own values, Fatimah is weary of straying too far from a preconceived line. “I prefer to blend in like a chameleon, so as to please my family while not compromising my beliefs.” Equally concerned with appearance and disappearance is Jude, a liberal arts graduate who recalls a time when colorful abayas were the great white whale of daring Saudi women. “Just five years ago, it was a struggle to find inspiring choices. Now, it seems like my norm is everyone else’s,” she rejoices.
Aram Kabbani

Whether it’s a sea of blackness or a prism of color, one thing is certain: Saudi women are engaged in a cultural reset of sorts, redefining the abaya by stripping it of the male gaze and casting it triumphantly under the female one. The abaya is feminine in noun and social construct – she’s come a long way and she’s blazing new trails.
Read Next: What You Need To Know About The Sheikh Hamdan-Approved Work From Home System
Originally published in the December 2020 Issue of Vogue Arabia

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