Queen

Kate Middleton Rewore Queen Elizabeth II’s Bahraini Pearl Earrings as Tribute to the Late Monarch at Her Funeral

Kate Middleton Rewore Queen Elizabeth II’s Bahraini Pearl Earrings as Tribute to the Late Monarch at Her Funeral

Photo: Getty
While the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth II abounded with vocal tributes, subtle sartorial nods to Britain’s longest reigning monarch too shared the spotlight in a special way. Catherine, Princess of Wales, Camilla, Queen Consort, and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, all paid homage to the Queen in remarkably personal manners, including wearing pieces from the royal archives and some gifted to them by the late monarch.
Photo: Instagram.com
Kate Middleton, in particular, wore earrings made of Bahraini pearls, which among many things, signify the Queen’s longstanding relationship with the Middle East. Although pearls have been traditionally associated with mourning since Queen Victoria’s reign, these specific earrings feature two out of the seven pearls gifted to Queen Elizabeth by Sheikh Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa of Bahrain on her wedding day in 1947. The pieces bring together one brilliant-cut round diamond, four small round diamonds, and three baguette-cut diamonds, placed above the Bahraini pearl. Loaned to the princess from the royal collection, the earrings were also worn by the former Duchess of Cambridge at Prince Philip’s funeral in April 2021.
Diana, Princess of Wales wearing the necklace in 1982. Photo: Instagram.com
The mother-of-three wore the jewelry with another sentimental piece, a stunning four-strand pearl and diamond choker. Commissioned by the Queen to jewelry maker Garrard, it is made using pearls gifted to her by the Japanese government in the ’70s. Not only was the necklace worn by Kate Middleton to Queen and Prince Philip’s diamond wedding anniversary in 2017, and later, the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral last year, but it was also loaned by the late monarch to Princess Diana for a banquet in 1982.
Read Next: Queen Rania Remembers Queen Elizabeth: “She May Be the Queen of England, but I Think She Is the Queen to All of Us”

Rarely Seen Tiaras To Go on Display at Buckingham Palace Tomorrow as Part of Summer Opening

Rarely Seen Tiaras To Go on Display at Buckingham Palace Tomorrow as Part of Summer Opening

The Queen photographed by Dorothy Wilding in 1952. Photo: Royal Collection Trust
The summer opening at Buckingham Palace this year will celebrate the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee with a special exhibition that revisits the monarch’s portrait sittings with photographer Dorothy Wilding. Platinum Jubilee: The Queen’s Accession, will not only showcase 24 of these historic images but will also see the jewelry that she wore in the portraits going on display alongside them.
The first sitting took place just 20 days after her accession to the throne and saw her wearing many jewels that held sentimental value. Many of the pieces were gifts, including a sapphire and diamond Cartier bracelet which was given to her by her father as an 18th birthday present, as well as a diamond necklace presented to her by the government of South Africa on her 21st birthday. One also gives us an insight into Her Majesty’s own tastes: the Nizam of Hyderabad necklace, a platinum necklace set with 300 diamonds, which she chose herself from Cartier as a wedding gift from the Indian ruler. She topped off this suite of jewels with the Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara, a wedding gift from her jewelry-collecting grandmother, Queen Mary.
The girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara. Photo: Royal Collection Trust
Another photographic sitting was organized just months after this first, in order to show the Queen wearing a coronet, which was thought to be more suitable for official use on stamps and currency. The Diamond Diadem, originally commissioned for King George IV’s coronation, was chosen. It was until recent years still worn by Her Majesty for the State Opening of Parliament but is now deemed too heavy.
The Vladimir Tiara. Photo: Royal Collection Trust
Images from the Queen’s final sitting with Wilding in 1956 are particularly special, as they were commissioned by the Bank of England but never used. They show her wearing the Vladimir Tiara, sometimes dubbed her favorite diadem, and another she inherited via her grandmother. It was originally made for Grand Duchess Vladimir of Russia in 1874 but was sold by her daughter to Queen Mary after the Russian Revolution and the execution of Tsar Nicholas II and his family.
The Queen photographed by Dorothy Wilding in 1956. Photo: Royal Collection Trust
Wilding had previously photographed Royal Family members including a young Prince George (later the Duke of Kent); and Elizabeth’s own parents, becoming the first woman to be awarded a Royal Warrant to be the official photographer to a king and queen at their coronation. Although English herself, Wilding also photographed a number of film stars and celebrities on both sides of the Atlantic, including Noël Coward, Cecil Beaton, Vivien Leigh, Anna May Wong, Tallulah Bankhead, Nancy Astor, Gertrude Lawrence and Sir Norman Hartnell.
Originally published in Tatler.com
Read Next: Pictures: 6 Times Queen Elizabeth Gave Us a Peek at Her Very Relatable Beauty Ritual

The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee is Being Celebrated with These Nature-Inspired Activations By Burberry

The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee is Being Celebrated with These Nature-Inspired Activations By Burberry

The Queen in Burberry. Photo: Instagram.com
The Queen‘s Platinum Jubilee is being celebrated far and wide, with many dedicated events taking place across the UK. Contributing to the festivities, Burberry has unveiled a series of special activations in London.
Photo: Courtesy of Burberry
A particularly collectible one is the British luxury brand’s new commemorative scarf. Taking over the square-shaped silk accessory are hand-illustrated motifs inspired by ancient British woodlands and their flora and fauna. The colorful print features Yew trees, bluebells, butterflies, squirrels, and birds which represent each of the four British nations: a robin for England, capercaillie for Scotland, sparrowhawk for Northern Ireland, and golden eagle for Wales. The scarf’s creation was marked by Burberry’s commitment to biodiversity, with the brand donated to the Woodland Trust which aims to make the country rich in native woods and trees.
Photo: Courtesy of Burberry
The UK’s natural treasures are also being celebrated via Burberry’s partnership with Superbloom, an immersive floral display set to surround the Tower of London. One of the outdoor installations contributed by the fashion house is Floating Meadow, a zero-waste installation of over 5,000 plants and 1.4 tonnes of recycled plastic collected from rivers around the UK. Aiming to promote pollination, the plants selected are reflective of the English river ecosystems and are often found on riverbanks such as the Thames. One of the main goals of the installation is to highlight the role natural grasslands and marshes play in storing carbon, and that flowering species play in providing food and nectar to pollinators and common riverside wildlife. Another installation worth paying a trip to is the Art Wall created in collaboration with digital artist Jon Emmony. The artwork depicts a future utopian world with biodiversity and nature at its core, and is located at the entrance of Superbloom at the Tower of London.
Photo: Courtesy of Burberry
Read Next: A Rainbow of Royal Outfits: 40 of Queen Elizabeth II’s Boldest Ensembles

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com