Princess Diana

27 of Princess Diana’s Most Beautiful Spring Outfits

27 of Princess Diana’s Most Beautiful Spring Outfits

Photo: Getty
Diana, Princess of Wales’s style was at its best in the spring and summer months. Spring, in particular, was all about sherbet hues and polka dots, which the People’s Princess made her own by way of power suiting and flippy dresses.
Pink was a recurring theme. She wore rosy shades while pregnant at the polo in 1982, in Canada and Australia in 1983, at the Derby in 1987, in Manchester and Nepal in 1993, and for a visit to Howe Barracks in 1995.
Paintbox hues always looked delightful, too. Like the searingly bright shades that were trending at the spring/summer 2022 and autumn/winter 2022 shows, Princess Diana had a penchant for bold color combinations. Lady Di was there first with neon green – worn for a trip to Italy in 1995.
Whether a spectator at a sporting event or greeting well-wishers on state visits, Princess Diana always dressed for the season. Vogue revisits her joyful spring style, below.

April 1982

Making a case for maternity polka dots in the Isles of Scilly.

Photo: Getty
June 1982

In another breezy dress while pregnant.

Photo: Getty
March 1983

In a baby pink dress and matching hat in Australia.

Photo: Getty
March 1983

Wearing a frilly peach dress in Australia.

Photo: Getty
April 1983

In sunshine-yellow in New Zealand.

Photo: Getty
April 1983

In polka dots in Perth, Australia.

Photo: Getty
April 1985

Donning stripes in Italy.

Photo: Getty
April 1985

In pink again in Italy.

Photo: Getty
June 1986

Sporting polka dots at the polo in Windsor.

Photo: Getty
June 1989

With a young Harry in a belted shirt dress.

Photo: Getty
March 1990

Dressing for spring in florals at the ballet.

Photo: Getty
March 1990

Colour blocking on a visit to Cameroon.

Photo: Getty
June 1990

Marking a new month in hot pink.

Photo: Getty
April 1992

Celebrating Easter in lemon yellow.

Photo: Getty
April 1992

Carrying a floral basket in Derbyshire.

Photo: Getty
May 1992

In a minty dress in Cairo.

Photo: Getty
May 1992

Wearing two-tone separates in Cairo.

Photo: Getty
March 1993

Wearing pink on a visit to Manchester.

Photo: Getty
April 1993

At a premiere in an off-the-shoulder dress.

Photo: Getty
May 1993

In pastel plaid suiting in London.

Photo: Getty
May 1995

Pretty in pink in Kent.

Photo: Getty
June 1985

Wearing florals at the polo.

Photo: Getty
June 1995

Out in fluoro green in Italy.

Photo: Getty
March 1997

At a confirmation service in bouclé blue.

Photo: Getty
March 1997

Photo: Getty
April 1997

In a powder-blue suit in sunny London.

Photo: Getty
June 1997

Making a statement in purple in Washington.

Photo: Getty
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

50 Royal Tiaras Will Go On Display At Sotheby’s Ahead Of The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee

50 Royal Tiaras Will Go On Display At Sotheby’s Ahead Of The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee

Photo: Courtesy of Sotheby’s
There are myriad ways to celebrate the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee this June, but the most enjoyable might be a trip to Sotheby’s mammoth royal exhibition, running from May 28 to June 15. Rather than homing in specifically on the Windsors, the storied auction house will trace the full history of the British monarchy in its “Royal Portraits & Manuscripts” showcase, assembling works ranging from Queen Elizabeth I’s celebrated Armada portrait, on loan from Woburn Abbey for the occasion, to Andy Warhol’s depiction of Queen Elizabeth II, based on a photograph taken at Windsor Castle in 1975 and released as part of the artist’s Reigning Queens series in 1985. Dotted amongst the historic paintings: rare and fascinating ephemera, including a death warrant signed by Elizabeth I, a gold and silver embroidered Bible that once belonged to Queen Anne, and collectors’ items from Elizabeth II’s Coronation.
Classical motifs inspired this diamond-set 1830s diadem.
It’s the tiaras, though, that make the exhibition so compelling – with aristocratic families from across Europe loaning their family jewels to Sotheby’s for the occasion. No less than 50 diadems will be on display, with Sotheby’s using each piece to highlight the evolution of jewelry design from the 18th century onwards. Take the spectacular 1830s tiara that nods to the classical styles of ancient Rome – brought back into fashion in the early 1800s by Napoleon Bonaparte and Empress Joséphine, whose love story will get the Ridley Scott treatment later this year. Even more unusual? A Van Cleef & Arpels creation from the ’60s, which nods to dazzling Indian jewelry with its turquoise cabochons.
A turquoise-set Van Cleef & Arpels tiara produced in the 1960s.
Meanwhile, over at Kensington Palace, Windsor diehards can take in images of the royal family from Queen Victoria’s reign onwards – with an emphasis on Queen Elizabeth II and her descendants, including Vogue photographer Norman Parkinson’s intimate family portraits of Princess Margaret and Lord Snowdon. The jewel in the exhibition’s crown? David Bailey’s 1988 photograph of Diana, Princess of Wales. Consider it the best possible way to keep yourself entertained until the next season of The Crown.
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk
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Elizabeth Debicki Just Recreated Princess Diana’s Revenge Dress Moment for ‘The Crown’

Elizabeth Debicki Just Recreated Princess Diana’s Revenge Dress Moment for ‘The Crown’

Photo: Getty
The next instalment of The Crown is currently in production, and if there were any doubts that season five of Peter Morgan’s Netflix drama would tackle Prince Charles’s infidelity, the latest shots of Elizabeth Debicki in character as Diana, Princess of Wales have put them to rest. Paparazzi captured the willowy Tenet star filming the late royal’s grand entrance at a Vanity Fair fundraiser for the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens in 1994, when she wore an off-the-shoulder chiffon dress by Greek designer Christina Stambolian and silk Manolo Blahnik heels, entrancing the media. Making her PR coup even more noteworthy? The fact that it drowned out all coverage of her estranged husband’s ITV documentary, Charles: The Private Man, The Public Role, which aired the same night and included his confession of adultery during their marriage.
Diana accessorized the dress with a pearl necklace featuring a sapphire gifted to her by the Queen Mother. Photo: Princess Diana Archive
According to Stambolian, Diana had originally purchased the so-called revenge dress back in 1991, but had deemed it too risqué to wear up until that point. “[The princess] chose not to play the scene like Odette, innocent in white,” she later reflected. “She was clearly angry. She played it like Odile, in black. She wore bright red nail enamel, which we had never seen her do before. She was saying, ‘Let’s be wicked tonight!’” The late Vogue editor Anna Harvey, who styled Diana for years, put it more succinctly: “She wanted to look a million dollars–and she did.”
A pair of silk Manolo heels completed the look. Photo: Tim Graham
Lending further credence to the theory that Diana intentionally blotted out coverage of Charles’s documentary with Jonathan Dimbleby? The fact that the princess originally turned down Vanity Fair. “She had declined the invitation until two days before the event until news of the adultery quote began to leak in promotions for the broadcast,” Tina Brown writes in The Diana Chronicles. “That’s when one of the gala’s organizers, an old family friend of Diana’s, got a surprise phone call: “She said she wanted to come after all. I said, ‘What are you up to?’ And she said, ‘You’ll see.’” According to reports, the princess actually had a different Valentino gown lined up for the evening, but sketches got leaked to the press–triggering the last-minute, headline-grabbing switch.

Originally published on Vogue.co.uk
Read next: Kristen Stewart Takes You Through Her Best Chanel Costumes in Spencer

Kristen Stewart Takes You Through Her Best Chanel Costumes in Spencer

Kristen Stewart Takes You Through Her Best Chanel Costumes in Spencer

Photo: Suzie Riemer, Courtesy of Chanel
Everyone knows Princess Diana—or they think they do. The royal, who would have turned 60 this year, remains a subject of fascination among the public and artists. After capturing Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’s private struggles following her husband’s assassination in 2016’s Jackie, director Pablo Larraín turned his attention to Diana’s story. His new film, Spencer, offers a fictionalized account of the princess, played by Kristen Stewart, at a turning point during the queen’s annual Christmas holiday at Sandringham House in Norfolk, England. The pivotal three days from Christmas Eve to Boxing Day magnify the many problems within Diana’s personal life. Under surveillance by the Windsors’ retinue of courtiers, trapped in failing marriage, and told to keep up appearances while struggling with an eating disorder, she’s far removed from fairy tales.
Larraín frames his film as a fable, exploring the dark side of the monarchy without eschewing the fantasy and beauty that keeps the system going. Diana’s life may be falling apart, but she looks the part of a princess and is surrounded by luxury. That contrast is part of what makes the film powerful. Creating the wardrobe of the allegorical Windsor meant Larraín, costume designer Jacqueline Durran, and Stewart had to be on the same page. Thankfully, they had some help from a fashion giant: Chanel. “Every step of the way, it was a total collaboration,” shared Stewart via email. “We were all in this together: me, Pablo, Jacqueline, and Chanel. It was so intimate.”
Photo: Suzie Riemer, Courtesy of Chanel
Chanel opened its archives to the production, loaning and re-creating vintage pieces for Stewart to wear onscreen. This level of access allowed Durran to heighten the luxurious mood that Larraín and production designer Guy Hendrix Dyas created. “In terms of style and glamour, the collaboration gave the movie something we wouldn’t have had otherwise,” she says. “The Chanel pieces added to that aura Diana had as a princess, so it was an incredible match in that sense.”
There are thousands of photographs and articles about Diana to draw from, but the wealth of information was a double-edged sword. “In the beginning, it was an intimidating situation because there were just so many images of her,” says Durran, who focused her attention on photos shot between 1988 and 1992. “What I wanted to find was the logic behind her choices and the key pieces you see her wear during that period. Certain elements repeat—color blocking, gold buttons, contrasting lapels, polo-neck sweaters, and high-waist, slightly cropped jeans with flat pumps.” Figuring out Diana’s staples was crucial. “I had to establish a contrast between the formal and restrictive clothes she wears during her official life and the way she dresses when she can be herself,” says Durran. “To tell this story, you had to see a real difference between those clothes.”
Photo: Suzie Riemer, Courtesy of Chanel
To that end Durran used a series of archival gems to achieve both types of Diana’s looks. Stewart wears a striking red tweed coat from the fall 1988 Patrimoine ready-to-wear collection as Diana is mobbed by paparazzi, black velvet dresses from the fall 1983 and 1988 collections, and a slew of vintage accessories. A few modern pieces sneak in too; in one scene, Stewart sports the skirt from look 46 from Virginie Viard’s spring 2020 haute couture collection.
Chanel had a special place in Diana’s wardrobe. A fan of its classic suits and quilted bags, she wore her collection off-duty and while performing her role as Princess of Wales. Stewart found Diana’s outfit selections evocative. “In certain photographs of [Diana], she looks as though someone else dressed her,” she says. “Even if the outfit is beautiful, she seems like a prisoner in it. While doing my research, I noticed that whenever Diana was wearing Chanel, she seemed like herself. When she looked powerful, quite often she was wearing Chanel.” Stewart incorporated the observation into her performance. “When you watch the movie, all the Chanel looks are used when Diana needs help,” she explains. “If the scene was difficult or she felt threatened, we put her in a Chanel suit to give her a bit of a support system. Even if she wasn’t feeling good on the inside, she stood tall and shined during those moments.”
Stewart has some experience wearing Chanel. A brand ambassador since 2013, she’s known for her distinctive take on the brand’s signatures. Though her style is worlds away from Diana’s, she felt the Chanel archival pieces were essential to the story. “If I didn’t have a relationship with Chanel, we would have begged the house to play with their clothes; if we weren’t allowed to, we would have probably mimicked them,” says Stewart. “The character needed them. They’re such a part of her. There is a delicacy and a vulnerability [to the clothes] that makes them even more beautiful. She’s so raw and honest that when she puts them on, you can feel she loves them.”
Look 82 from the spring-summer 1988 Chanel Haute Couture collection on model Anne FionaBertrand Rindoff Petroff
The skirt from look 46 from Chanel’s spring-summer 2020 haute couture collection (here on model Fran Summers) was worn in the film.
Unfortunately, many of Diana’s best Chanel moments came after her exit from the royal family, and Spencer’s story plays out during a period where courtiers controlled her wardrobe. “There were all these restrictions to consider,” says Durran. “She wore more Chanel later in life than during the late ’80s and early ’90s.” The royal dress code, which contains rules about everything from hem lengths to nail-polish colors, couldn’t be ignored. Still, when Durran happened upon the film’s pièce de résistance, a strapless gown from Chanel’s spring 1988 haute couture collection, she wasn’t about to change it. “Initially, I was worried we’d have to add sleeves and hide her arms because of the protocols,” she says. “When I had the fitting with Kristen and Paolo in London, she put it on and it was just so great, the perfect look for an extremely glamorous princess. We hadn’t even planned to use it for such a large chunk of the movie, but it was just too good to pass up.”
Adorned with pleated tulle ruffles, an appliqué satin belt, and a delicate frieze composed of fabric florets, the gown was appropriately opulent. Still, after more than 30 years in the archives, the original was far too fragile to function as a costume. “It was too precious—you couldn’t even take it outside,” says Durran. “Thankfully, Chanel came back to us and said they could completely replicate the piece.” It took 1,034 hours—700 devoted solely to the intricate embroidery—to duplicate the couture look. With five seamstresses in Chanel’s atelier working nonstop, they were able to turn the project around in just under a month. “We’re indebted to them,” says Durran. “They had almost no time and were able to recreate every detail. In the end, the only difference was that the new version fit Kristen even better than the first.”
Photo: Suzie Riemer, Courtesy of Chanel
Though it wasn’t the only piece recreated for the film, the couture gown features prominently in the final cut and its poster, which shows Diana crumpled on the ground, her body shrouded in layers of tulle. For Stewart, the couture reflected Diana’s privileged yet unhappy existence. “It’s heartbreaking how gorgeous it was,” she says of the look. “We went through the archives thinking, What is the dress? [And] it was so undeniably the right one. To see someone on the bathroom floor in such a dress is truly heartbreaking. You can’t imagine someone being unwell in a dress [that is] so spectacularly beautiful, unique, and one of a kind. I have such nostalgia for it. Usually, I don’t have an emotional reaction to my movie posters, but every time I see Spencer’s, it makes me want to cry.”
For Durran, helping to facilitate such powerful responses from Stewart was the costume design’s primary role.  “My work is supporting her as an actress,” she says. “Watching the final movie was overwhelming because the only thing I wanted was for my work to give Kristen all she needed to achieve her performance. I believed in her so much, and she’s mesmerizing as Diana.”

Originally published in Vogue.com
Read Next: The Lebanese Jeweler Sharing the Spotlight with Kristen Stewart in Princess Diana’s Biopic

The Designer Behind Lady Diana’s Power Suits Reveals What It Was Like To Dress A Princess

The Designer Behind Lady Diana’s Power Suits Reveals What It Was Like To Dress A Princess

Diana in her Amanda Wakeley power tailoring.
The first time Amanda Wakeley met Diana, Princess of Wales, they both burst out laughing. Wakeley, a rising British designer, was scurrying around her small Chelsea studio preparing to face a police escort ushering in the royal. But when the buzzer rang five minutes early, she was not greeted by sniffer dogs. Diana herself stood there alone, as bemused by the whole supposed drama of it all as Amanda was. Giggling was the only thing to do. They hit it off right away.
Anna Harvey had made the introduction. The former British Vogue deputy editor and Diana style counsel was a keen advocate of young fashion talent and Wakeley’s fledging label, then just 18 months old, was carving out a reputation for what the designer calls her “clean glam aesthetic”. She quickly received Lady Di’s stamp of approval and created her a navy crepe double breasted suit with invisible button detailing and a tiny seed pearl dangling flirtatiously from a single tassel. “She was not a massively demanding client,” Wakeley remembers of a royal with few airs and graces. “She loved what I was proposing; nine times out of 10 she would go with the sample.”
Another sleek blackberry-coloured suit with velvet trims on the collar and cuffs–not dissimilar to the bottle-green two-piece she wore when she retired from public life–was indicative of Diana’s appreciation for quality fashion. “I always believe that the way clothes make you feel is incredibly important,” explains Wakeley, who lines her tailoring with silk for a luxurious feel that is both comforting and indulgent. “I think if you’re heading for a tricky moment, slipping into something that feels gorgeous is very reassuring.” The speech Diana gave in her empowering black blazer was during the height of the press scrutiny around her bulimia and, Wakeley recalls, the princess greeted her audience by saying something along the lines of, “I suppose you thought I wouldn’t be here, because I’d have my head down the loo.” “She used clothes to [send a] message very powerfully,” asserts Wakeley. “Just look at the revenge dress.”
Most of the off-duty pieces Amanda made for Diana – namely, exquisite cashmere jumpers and leather pants – were never photographed, but the designer recalls a particular red knitted body with a fabulous cut-out back, which she absolutely loved. “This is the sort of thing you could get in trouble wearing,” said Di at the time, with Amanda attesting: “She had a real sense of naughtiness”. In the showroom, the duo chatted about city versus country life and the inspirations behind Amanda’s work. “She loved detail,” muses the business owner, who laments not saving a cheque Prince Charles once sent to her, which would have been a nice relic from a time before iPhones.
Had Diana been around to see the Instagram age, Amanda says she would have been blessed with a generous number of pictures of the royal wearing her looks. The pair frequented the same Chelsea Harbour gym, with Wakeley witnessing the paparazzi frenzy around the princess’s car-to-club house looks. “I will never forget first seeing her in her cycling shorts,” she shares. “She had a Wakeley ecru cashmere jumper with satin cuffs thrown on over the top and I just thought it epitomised everything about her. She just looked so chic. It felt very ahead of its time.”
Those famous athleisure pictures represent the sartorial confidence Diana learned later on. “She had got through her Sloaney, pie-crust collar phase,” continues Wakeley. “Her hair was shorter, she became sleeker… It was extraordinary how young she was when she was thrown into the whole circus.” Her style during these later years is testament to what Wakeley’s own fashion meant to her. “Diana used clothes to empower her,” she muses. “In the beginning, she was sort of wearing a costume. Her style became effortless as the years ticked on.”
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk
Read Next: The Lebanese Jeweler Sharing the Spotlight with Kristen Stewart in Princess Diana’s Biopic

The Lebanese Jeweler Sharing the Spotlight with Kristen Stewart in Princess Diana’s Biopic

The Lebanese Jeweler Sharing the Spotlight with Kristen Stewart in Princess Diana’s Biopic

Kristen Stewart as Princess Diana in Spencer. Photo: Neon
Those who kept up with Diana, Princess of Wales during her time in the limelight and studied her posthumously will know how much she loved jewelry. As her biopic, Spencer, starring Kristen Stewart aims to represent her life as accurately as possible, mirroring some of her most iconic pieces was crucial. To do just that, Mouawad, the Swiss-Emirati house with Lebanese origins was enlisted as the exclusive jeweler. Founded in 1890 in Beirut by David Mouawad, the jewelry house has traveled through Saudi and is now headquartered in Dubai and Geneva.
Photo: Courtesy of Mouawad
Spencer‘s official trailer offered glimpses of a few of the jewelry pieces worn by Stewart, including her engagement ring. A nod to Princess Diana’s own ring, Mouawad’s creation features featuring 1.82ct diamonds and a 7.2ct blue sapphire.
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Tapping into a life-changing Christmas Eve to Boxing Day period at the Queen’s Norfolk home, Sandringham, Spencer focuses on the time the Princess decided to leave Prince Charles. It received a standing ovation following its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival and is expected to release in the US and the UK on November 5.
Princess Diana and Prince Charles after the announcement of their engagement. Photo: Getty
Mouawad has a long-standing record of being the choice for notable gifts to royalty, prime ministers, celebrities, and the heads of some states. “It has been a pleasure to work on Spencer, providing the jewelry for the role of an iconic princess known for her style as well as her powerful impact on the world,” stated the house’s fourth-generation co-guardians, Fred, Alain, and Pascal Mouawad.
Read Next: Everything We Know So Far About Spencer, Kristen Stewart’s Diana, Princess of Wales Biopic

Princess Diana’s Favorite Shirts are Still a Fall Essential

Princess Diana’s Favorite Shirts are Still a Fall Essential

Bosnia, 1997. Photo: Getty
Fall is firmly on our style agenda now, and we’d like all midriff-flossing pics to be archived, thank you very much. Making the shift from crochet to cashmere is easier said than done, however, and trans-seasonal wardrobe binders, like classic shirting, are key to making a smooth transition. From oversized “boyfriend” styles, to starched Oxfords and simple cotton poplin button-downs, there are few fashion conundrums a shirt can’t solve.
Bosnia, 1997. Photo: Getty
Bosnia, 1997. Photo: Getty
Diana, Princess of Wales – a woman whose style was so minutely analysed during (and after) her life – often relied upon this failsafe staple. A freshly-laundered shirt tucked into high-waisted, straight leg jeans with Tod’s Gommino loafers became her personal uniform for overseas trips during the late ’90s. It was the perfect, fuss-free formula to take her from Red Cross visits to state meetings, ensuring she looked pulled-together and entirely capable, without ever being too showy.
Nepal, 1993. Photo: Getty
London, 1994. Photo: Getty
She had of course relied upon shirting throughout her royal career, but, as was the way with the rest of her clothing, she streamlined her looks over time. Gone were the days of gold buttons, exaggerated sleeves and other ’80s frippery, Diana’s best shirts were quintessential Sloane ranger – the stiff, straight-talking styles you could (still) find at Ralph Lauren, Gap and Budd.

Read Next: The Secrets Behind Princess Diana’s Predominantly Pink Wardrobe
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

10 of Princess Diana’s Best Fashion Moments in the Middle East

10 of Princess Diana’s Best Fashion Moments in the Middle East

Princess Diana. Photo by Anwar Hussein
Though Princess Diana‘s legacy extends far beyond fashion, she is arguably one of the biggest fashion icons of the 20th Century. When she was only 25 years old, Princess Diana made two trips to the Middle East. The first trip to Bahrain, Oman, and Saudi Arabia and the second in March 1986 that included Kuwait and the UAE.
Diana developed a “very glamorous regal style” for overseas trips by donning outfits paying homage to the host nation. During a trip to Saudi Arabia in the 1980s, she wore a dress emblazoned with gold falcons, an emblem of Kingdom.
Ahead of what would have been her 60th birthday on July 1, we look at some of her best ensembles from royal tours in the Middle East over the years.

1986
Photo: Getty Images
As part of her Middle East tour in November 1986, Princess Diana is seen wearing a white evening gown in 1986.
1986
Photo: Getty Images
Princess Diana with HRH Prince Sultan bin Abdulaziz Al Saud in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in November 1986.
1986
Photo: Getty Images
Princess Diana is seen at the Palace of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Said al Said in Oman, during her Middle East royal tour in November 1986.
1986
Photo: Getty Images
Princess Diana is pictured here visiting a Bedouin Camp in the desert on her Middle East tour in November 1986.
1986
Photo: Getty Images
Wearing a black and white evening dress designed by the Emmanuels, Princess Diana attends a dinner given by the Crown Prince in Saudi Arabia on November 17, 1986
1986
Photo: Getty Images
The Princess of Wales is seen wearing a Catherine Walker outfit while a trip to the desert during a visit to Saudi Arabia in November 1986.
1989
Photo: Getty Images
This is from the Prince and Princess of Wales’ official visit to the Arab States in the Persian Gulf, March 1989 where Princess Diana is seen wearing a Catherine Walker suit and a Philip Somerville turban hat on arrival in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
1989
Photo: Getty Images
At the Islamic Museum in Kuwait in March 1989, the Princess is seen wearing a red and pink outfit designed by Catherine Walker.
1989
Photo: Getty Images
The Princess of Wales in Kuwait in March 1989 during her royal tour of the Gulf.
1992
Photo: Getty Images
Princess Diana pictured at the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt in May 1992.
Read Next: Princess Diana’s Statue Arrives at Kensington Palace Ahead of its Unveiling on Her 60th Birthday

The Secrets Behind Princess Diana’s Predominantly Pink Wardrobe

The Secrets Behind Princess Diana’s Predominantly Pink Wardrobe

At times, the princess’s favorite color coded moments of joy, steadfastness, and growing self-assurance; at others, it beamed motherly love. 

Consider the mood-lifting powers of pink, then turbocharge. Blush, cerise, cotton candy, rose, fuchsia — whatever your predilection, Diana, Princess of Wales wore it, and she wore it mighty well. 
In an era where celebrity stylists are the invisible architects of flawless public appearances, Diana’s lifelong love of pink was far less engineered. It was her favorite color — a partiality that, from the point that she ascended into public life, emitted an unassuming warmth. 
At the tender age of 22 on the April 1983 tour of Australia (a page in history that underwent The Crown treatment), the princess’s mostly all-pink wardrobe was a palliative sweetener. Diana’s initiation to royal married life was tough, but she didn’t abandon her rose-tinted wardrobe refrain. Her sartorial choices in those early days read as an indicator of the humanity that would later define her legacy. There was an unapologetically feminine power to the acres of marshmallow taffeta that drew admiration from across the world and signalled a changing of the guard. The soundtrack to the times? Michael Jackson’s Billie Jean was parked at the top of the Billboard charts — its electrifying video showing Jackson outfitted in a blush-pink shirt against a bubblegum sky. 
At varying times, Diana’s favorite color-coded moments of joy, steadfastness, and growing self-assurance; at others, it beamed motherly love. In 1986, she was pictured sitting on the steps of Highgrove House, a toddler Harry protected between her gingham-clad knees, her eyeline fixed warily on the photographer. In later official appearances, exacting day-to-evening tailoring replaced flowing cerise gowns. There were knife-sharp suits and body-skimming shift dresses crafted by Catherine Walker and Versace (by then, the late former British Vogue deputy editor Anna Harvey had leaned in as style adviser) — but the adoration of pink remained. Remember the Gianni Versace double-breasted, cap-sleeve skirt suit? That happened in the spring of 1995 — a ‘Roselette’ peony-hued look, which to this day remains nothing short of sublime. 
More than 25 years on, the flowers that lend the most irresistible shades of pink their mythologized names offer a poignant insight. Diana’s blossoming was all too fleeting. “I had a fitting with her last week for new suits and clothing for spring, and she is so serene,” Versace said of his friend in the July 1997 issue of Vanity Fair, which featured the princess on its cover. Within just a few months of publication, both would tragically pass away. “It is a moment in her life, I think, when she’s found herself — the way she wants to live.” 
Scroll through the gallery above to see 30 reasons why we’ll always love Diana in pink.
Read Next: 10 of Princess Diana’s Best Fashion Moments in the Middle East
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

Meet the Designer Behind the Iconic Cartier Watches Loved by Bella Hadid and Princess Diana

Meet the Designer Behind the Iconic Cartier Watches Loved by Bella Hadid and Princess Diana

Creative director of watchmaking Marie-Laure Cérède tells Vogue what makes her tick as she unveils her new designs for the 174-year-old brand.
Bella Hadid. Photo: Getty
A surprising fact about Marie-Laure Cérède, Cartier’s creative director of watchmaking, is that she never wears her wristwatch set to the right time. “It’s a creative statement,” she tells Vogue. “I don’t want my Cartier watch to tell me the time. My time is busy, and this is an object of grace and beauty.” Her words echo that of artist Andy Warhol, who was rarely seen without his Cartier Tank, of which he once said: “I don’t wear a Tank watch to tell the time. Actually, I never even wind it. I wear a Tank because it is the watch to wear.”
Watches created by the 174-year-old maison, which first began as a jeweler, have long adorned the wrists of the stylish and influential, from Princess Diana (Tank Solo) and Michelle Obama (Tank Française) to Dua Lipa and Bella Hadid (both Panthère de Cartier fans). And Cérède is charged with building on that legacy, which can be traced back to 1904 – when Louis Cartier first created a watch with a leather strap for Brazilian aviator Alberto Santos-Dumont.
At the Watches and Wonders trade show (7 to 13 April) in Geneva, Switzerland, Cartier unveiled several new designs including the particularly innovative and achingly chic SolarBeat Tank Must (the maison’s first solar-powered watch), complete with non-animal leather strap. We caught up with Cérède over Zoom during this year’s digital event to find out what makes her tick.
Dua Lipa. Photo: Getty
What initiated your fascination with horology and watch design?
“I like watchmaking because there is a complexity to it. You need to express your creativity, but there are technical constraints; you have to respect the movement, the technical requirements of the material, all the while freeing your way of thinking. I find this tension between savoir-faire and creation really interesting.”
Do you remember who gave you your first watch?
“Me! Not long after I joined Cartier, there was a staff sale, which made things much more affordable [laughs]. I bought a Tank Divan, which has a beautiful horizontal case.”
What’s the most important aspect of your job?
“On the one hand, we have the unrivalled treasure of the archives, and on the other, we have to build the vocabulary of tomorrow. Cartier was a jeweller before it was a watchmaker, so we need to make watches with the same audacity as jewellery. This connection with the past, of mastering the heritage, is very important.”
Michelle Obama. Photo: Getty
And how do you do that – honour the maison’s heritage as you take it into its next chapter?
“Looking at the archives and being inspired by them is part of our daily lives. But we don’t stop there – whenever we launch an Icon [a collection that brings together Cartier’s most enduring designs], we look at how we can improve it, from the technical components to the sustainability standards. For instance, for the Tank Must we inserted a photovoltaic movement [a panel that converts sunlight to electrical energy] and equipped it with a non-leather strap.
“For the new Cloche designs [of which there are six], we looked at every version that had ever been made since it became a wristwatch over one hundred years ago and rotated its bell-shaped case 90 degrees, so you can set it on a nightstand or desk. We decided to equip some of the versions with a Roman numerals skeleton movement.”
Where do you go to find inspiration?
“I grew up in Gabon, Central Africa, so I’m drawn to nature’s colours, especially exotic flora and fauna such as porcelain rose and bougainvillaea, as well as gems – fine stones such as Paraiba tourmaline with its neon-blue hues, which reminds me of a lagoon, and watermelon tourmaline.
“I love contemporary furniture and decor for its noble and living materials – woodwork, natural stone and handmade fabrics. I often go to auctions of Italian furniture and seek out pieces by Tobia Scarpa, Gae Aulenti, Driade and Pulpo. And the central philosophy of wabi-sabi – ‘beauty lies in imperfection’ – really resonates with me.
“Beautiful writing also inspires me. For example What I Loved by Siri Hustvedt [Sceptre, 2003], The Lovers by Alice Ferney [Atlantic, 2003], Sur les Chemins Noirs by Sylvain Tesson [Gallimard, 2016] and Disturbance by Philippe Lançon [Europa Editions, 2019].
“And contemporary art. I particularly enjoy the Taglialatella Galleries, with its works by the likes of Kouka, Lucas Ribeyron and Ivan Messac.”
Princess Diana. Photo: Getty
What makes a watch design truly great?
“It’s easy to make something beautiful. What is not easy is to remove all the decorative details, and keep only the essentials. I always tell my team that a Cartier creation should be a signature in a single stroke. It’s all about emotion.”
Do you have any muses?
“I have more passions than I have muses. To think in terms of muse could limit my creativity.”
You’ve worked for Cartier since 2002, in which time smartphones have become an integral part of our lives – how has technology impacted your job?
“Today, the function of a watch is not only to tell the time. We have so many things – a smartphone, as you say – to tell us the time. So a Cartier watch is a way to assert your aesthetic identity; it’s a declaration of beauty, self-expression and uniqueness rather than simply an instrument to tell the time.”
Your work revolves around time – how do you manage your own time effectively and find a healthy work/life balance?
“Although I’m a mother of three kids, I have no trouble with the work/life balance because my work is a passion and part of myself. It’s quite natural for my kids to see me as a mother and a creative person – it’s quite fluid. Creative people always think about creation, there isn’t a moment to create and a moment to not create. Sometimes you see something in your own time and you form a new idea.”
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Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

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