pink

Balqees Fathi Embodies the Vibrant Spirit of Color With Valentino’s New Pink PP Collection

Balqees Fathi Embodies the Vibrant Spirit of Color With Valentino’s New Pink PP Collection

Vogue Arabia, September 2022. Photo: Mann
With the launch of its Pink PP collection, Valentino is making quirky waves and bringing brighter, dramatic hues to the fashion domain in one fell swoop. The vibrant ensembles, which have already become a global hit, range from the styles of sass to comfort, rightly paying tribute to the brand, Maison Valentino, and its shift to glossy glamor and alluring themes.
Electric hues can often be tricky to nail, but as Maison Valentino takes bold strides with its bright pink collection, the world’s best dressed stars, from Zendaya and Dua Lipa to Vanessa Hudgens, have been unable to resist its cheerful palette. Directed by the creative mastermind of Valentino, Pierpaolo Piccioli, the new Valentino collection is stripping its color palette down to a single hue as an experimental urge rises within the brand. Piccioli has been envisioning the fashion world through his rose-colored lens for quite some time now, and in this month’s issue of Vogue Arabia, Emirati singer Balqees Fathi takes over our pages in a range of delicious looks from the brand’s latest drop. While the color of her ensembles remains constant, what makes her looks pop is Piccioli’s innovative mix of textures. While one shot shows Balqees dripping in rosy rhinestones, another has her doused in plush feather details. The bold Pierpaolo Piccioli pinks are only interrupted with solid washes of black, which bring in a hint of drama.
In her latest shoot, Balqees sets the mood for escapism that matches the thought process Valentino is hoping to bring attention to. Below, dive into Balqees’s dreamworld of pinks and ebonies. You won’t be able to resist its romantic charm.
Vogue Arabia, September 2022. Photo: Mann
Vogue Arabia, September 2022. Photo: Mann
Vogue Arabia, September 2022. Photo: Mann
Vogue Arabia, September 2022. Photo: Mann
Vogue Arabia, September 2022. Photo: Mann
Valentino’s Pink PP collection launches across the Middle East—and worldwide—on September 15, 2022.
Photography: MannStyle: Cedric Haddad Hair and makeup: Ivan Kuz Set design and art direction: Fuad Ali at Duette Studio Floral artist: Jessica Locke at House of BloomsCar: Alexandre Choueiry Production: Danica Zivkovic On-set producer: Sam Allison Photography assistant: Ali Jerome
Read next: 5 Things to Know About Valentino’s Fall/Winter 2022 Couture Show in Rome

Balqees Fathi Wore an All-Pink Look with Staggering High Platforms to Her Dubai Concert

Balqees Fathi Wore an All-Pink Look with Staggering High Platforms to Her Dubai Concert

Photo: Rudolf Azzi
The fashion world is clearly not over the magic of the color pink, and neither is Balqees Fathi. For her sold-out concert in Dubai, the Emirati-Yemeni singer stunned in a full Valentino look, in the fashion house’s signature and shocking hue of pink nonetheless.

Fathi went for an ultra-feminine outfit from the Valentino Pink PP collection, which featured a mini dress paired with tights and gloves, styled by Cedric Haddad. While the dress came with glittering floral embellishments all over, the opaque tights and gloves were all matte for contrast. The highlight, however, were the staggering high platforms, which continue to rank high on every young fashion lover’s wish list, and added a bold edge to Fathi’s otherwise girly look. The singer also posed for the ‘gram in a series of photos, which show her look accessorized by a pair of dainty earrings by Marli New York. Sleek and straight hair balanced out the loudness of her outfit, while neutral, matte makeup completed her look for the evening.
Photo: Rudolf Azzi
This marks Fathi’s second pink ensemble from Valentino, following the laser cut dress she wore to the fashion house’s Fall-Winter 2022 couture show in Rome. In case you were not sold on the color yet, let her latest look change your mind.
Read Next: This Is the Sparkling It Bag Balqees Fathi, Salma Abu Deif, and More Are Crushing on Right Now

Faouzia Makes a Case for Modest Popstar Style in This Season’s Hottest Color

Faouzia Makes a Case for Modest Popstar Style in This Season’s Hottest Color

Photo: Instagram.com/faouzia
Currently on a world tour, Faouzia stopped by Dubai and Cairo this month to perform her first-ever concerts in the cities. In Egypt, the Moroccan-Canadian star made a strong case for modest popstar style, dressed in a look in this summer’s hottest color, pink.
Photo: Instagram.com/faouzia
Her outfit, a vibrant co-ord, was picked from Valentino, the brand that helped popularize the color this season via its Fall/Winter 2022-23 collection. The singer’s collared top came with full sleeves and a flattering corset-style silhouette, while flared bottoms added femininity to her look. The 22-year-old accessorized the pieces with pink platform heels from Valentino and fuchsia gloves for her signature edgy aesthetic. The ‘Minefields’ singer also wore her dark mane in a high ponytail with gelled locks of hair framing her face. For her glam, Faouzia balanced out the brightly colored ensemble with a neutral makeup look, featuring defined lashes and a nude lip.
Photo: Instagram.com/faouzia
Alongside her series of hits which include ‘Tears of Gold’ and ‘Born Without a Heart’, Faouzia has come to be known for her dynamic sartorial sense that combines the best of Gen-Z dressing with high fashion. From exaggerated shapes and fabrics like vinyl and velour to electric colors, her wardrobe features all that is bold, from brands like Dolce & Gabbana and Burberry. As she heads to the USA for the remainder of her tour, keep an eye out to see more of her noteworthy style.
Read Next: Faouzia Takes on Snowy NYC in a Purple Catsuit, Blue Coat, and Hot Pink Faux Fur Stole

1992 to Now: What Barbiecore Looked Like Before Barbiecore

1992 to Now: What Barbiecore Looked Like Before Barbiecore

Brigitte Bardot in a promotion for Naughty Girl, 1956. Photo: Getty
God might have created woman—if the title of Roger Vadim’s 1956 film is to be believed—but Mattel created Barbie. Would the fantastical plastic doll have been possible without the popularity of real-life sex kitten Brigitte Bardot? There might not be a definitive answer to that question, but it’s certain that both the woman and the plaything represented unattainable beauty ideals.
An original Barbie launched in March 1959. Photo: Getty
Over the years Barbie has expanded her repertoire and her wardrobe. The filming of Greta Gerwig’s forthcoming movie has made Barbiecore—which mostly translates into skimpy looks in bright pink—the trend of this summer. It’s not the first time, and won’t be the last, that this überfeminine aesthetic has peaked.

Below, take a look at some throwback Barbie moments.
Karen Mulder in Valentino Couture, fall 1992. Photo: Getty
Chanel, spring 1994 ready-to-wear. Photo: Condé Nast Archive
Brandy Quinones in Thierry Mugler, spring 1994 ready-to-wear. Photo: Getty
Claudia Schiffer in Chanel, spring 1995 ready-to-wear. Photo: Getty
Claudia Schiffer in Atelier Versace, fall 1996 couture. Photo: Getty
Carla Bruni in Balmain, spring 1996 couture. Photo: Getty
Karen Mulder, Cindy Crawford, and Eva Herzigova in Hervé Léger, spring 1996. Photo: Getty
Paris Hilton, 2001 Photo: Instagram.com
Miley Cyrus in Moschino, 2014. Photo: Instagram.com
Moschino, spring 2015 ready-to-wear
Moschino, spring 2015 ready-to-wear
Moschino, spring 2015 ready-to-wear
Rihanna in Giambattista Valli, 2015. Photo: Instagram.com
Moschino, fall 2019 ready-to-wear. Photo: GoRunway
Kacey Musgraves as Barbie in Moschino at the 2019 Met gala. Photo: Getty
Originally published in Vogue.com
Read next: Hailey Bieber Is the Latest Star To Jump on Board the Real-Life Barbie Trend With a Bright Pink Dress

Dorra Zarrouk Paired Her Hot Pink Pantsuit With Comfy Sneakers for a Day Out in Barcelona

Dorra Zarrouk Paired Her Hot Pink Pantsuit With Comfy Sneakers for a Day Out in Barcelona

Photo: Instagram.com/dorra_zarrouk
From Fatima Al Banawi to Zendaya, celebrities all around the world seem to be crushing on pantsuits lately. But while most have been gravitating towards subtle hues (think pastel blues and cool grays), some stars seem to be in an experimental mood of late, stepping out in playful versions of the power staple in acid hues.

Just days after Blake Lively was seen walking through the streets of New York in a tangerine set, Tunisian actor Dorra Zarrouk took to her Instagram page to share snapshots of herself in a hot pink edition of the must-have ensemble. While enjoying a getaway in Barcelona, Spain, the star posed for the ‘gram in a bold pink blazer with black buttons, which she pared with matching form-fitting trousers. Instead of pairing the separates with a classic white shirt or slinky camisole, however, the star went the matchy-matchy route, layering her pantsuit over a pink turtleneck. The only element of contrast? Zarrouk’s black and white Prada sling bag, which perfectly complemented her black and white sneakers. The kicks also featured soft pink detailing, tying her holiday look together seamlessly.
Dorra Zarrouk opted for her favorite hairstyle with her hot pink pantsuit
In Dorra Zarrouk’s beauty book, nothing beats the charm of a soft blow-dry. So it comes as no surprise that for her day out in Barcelona, the actor paired her all-pink outfit with easy waves in chocolate brown. Leaving her face makeup-free save for a swipe of creamy lipstick, the actor made a strong case for less-is-more beauty looks. She also seems to have skipped on jewelry altogether, making for the ideal on-the-go look.
Whether you’re planning a getaway to a chilly city, or have always wanted to invest in a sharp work-ready set, take cues from Dorra Zarrouk’s latest look and add a spunky pantsuit to your closet. Want to tone the look down? All you need to do is style each separate with neutral pieces to create brand new, wearable looks.

Why Pink Will Always Be the Color That Shocks, Entices, and Enthralls

Why Pink Will Always Be the Color That Shocks, Entices, and Enthralls

From a history of rich meaning and traditions, pink still rises as the color to shock, entice, and enthrall.
Photographed by Julien Vallon
Ursula von der Leyen’s mood was about as magenta pink as her blazer when she was denied a proper seat during a diplomatic visit to Turkey in April. The first woman to head the European Commission and one of the most powerful in the world was relegated to a couch as her colleague Charles Michel, president of the European Council, and President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey settled into two chairs. Afterward, standing tall before the European Parliament, Von der Leyen warned that sexism endures at all levels. The German politician even speculated if appearing in less feminine attire would have granted her the treatment she deserved that day. “Would this have happened if I had worn a suit and a tie?” she asked.
Photo: Courtesy of Chanel
Historically, pink has proven to be one of the most emotionally evocative and controversial colors of all the spectrum. It’s most dazzling iteration, shocking pink, was popularized by the late Italian couturier Elsa Schiaparelli, who made the intense magenta her signature color in 1937, ensuring her subsequent designs stood out against the austere palettes of the battle-weary Forties. Decades later, further socio-political movements in the west would embrace the color again, when knitted pink hats became a symbol of the 2017 Women’s March, a worldwide protest movement against US President Donald Trump.
Pink is said to have been worn in ancient India and imperial China, as well as the upper echelons of 18th century European society, where it was a symbol of social status, since the materials used to dye such lavish garments were imported from expensive expeditions to central Asia and South America. In art, it symbolized youth and romance. Madame de Pompadour, the chief mistress of Louis XV of France, was so enamored with the color, French porcelain manufacturer Sèvres created a shade specifically for her, called Rose Pompadour, in 1757. Yet for centuries, the color was associated with masculinity, with boys being dressed in pink and girls in blue (with babies traditionally wearing white and the military mostly wearing red, pink was seen as appropriate for boys). This connection only started swapping in the 1940s, with the final transition to pink as a feminine color coming in the 1950s, when US first lady Mamie Eisenhower wore a pink gown as her inaugural dress, thereby cementing the color as one for “ladies.”
Photo: Courtesy of Stella McCartney
Bright pink soon found its way to the big screen, too. Marilyn Monroe wore shocking pink to scintillating effect in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953). Dressed in a raspberry William Travilla silk strapless gown and matching opera gloves, Monroe swatted away suitors with her fan while singing “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend.” In the 1957 Audrey Hepburn movie Funny Face, the magazine editor-in- chief character Maggie Prescott sings an ode to the color, exclaiming, “If she’s gotta think, think pink!” And who can forget the pink satin jackets donned by the Pink Ladies in the 1978 film Grease? The color made it off-screen, too, with many stars choosing shades of pink for some of their biggest moments. A tearful Gwyneth Paltrow wore a powder pink Ralph Lauren gown when she accepted her best actress Oscar in 1999; Rihanna chose a voluminous Giambattista Valli dress for the 2015 Grammy Awards; Lady Gaga displayed her unbridled sense of female emancipation on the 2019 Met Gala red carpet in a billowing shocking pink Brandon Maxwell dress.
Marilyn Monroe. Photo: Alamy
Designers from Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel to Schiaparelli’s most recent successor, Daniel Roseberry, demonstrate that pink is a symbol of feminine power. For his SS21 couture presentation, Roseberry borrowed a page from the maison’s surrealist past, unfurling a glossy black molded bustier with chiseled abs, enveloped in a signature shocking pink bow. “The pink, in particular, I find to be a very modern code of the house,” reflects the artistic director.
Lady Gaga. Photo: Getty
Regional couture designers Zuhair Murad, Nicolas Jebran, Azzi & Osta, and Rabih Kayrouz are also helping propel pink through the millennium. Known for their fashion-forward couture, George Azzi and Assaad Osta opted for a dessert motif for their SS21 collection of floor-sweeping evening looks, including luxuriant jumpers fastened with glamorous swathes of iridescent melon satin. “We don’t see pink as a color for girls. With its endless shades, pink can be perfect for decoration, interiors, menswear… Anything, really. For women, it signifies blush powders, vibrant skin, attractiveness… It represents the softer or wilder side of a man or woman,” Azzi & Osta explains. Meanwhile, Chanel offered bubblegum pink tweed suits styled over magenta swimsuits for Resort 2021; Loewe featured the rosy hue as a backdrop for sunflower prints for SS21; Gucci SS21 offered electric pink as potential officewear in the form of a shirt and pants; and Stella McCartney broke out the potent hue across a one- sleeved dress with capuche for its SS21 presentation.

Many of the colors on the runway are conceived by textile mills like Taroni SpA near Italy’s palazzo- studded Lake Como. Its CEO and creative director, Maximilian Canepa, a 12th generation textile maker, is the keeper of more than 1000 color recipes influenced by everything from shiny salmon skins to corals; from camellias plucked from the family garden to the vintage cars. “If you take a color from something valuable or so rare in nature and from something powerful and rich, it resonates with creatives,” remarks Canepa.
Photo: Courtesy of Zuhair Murad
Pink does have its naysayers, though, especially among people rejecting the rigid gender-conformity still associated with it. While some parents choose not to buy their daughters any rose-colored clothing, others have spoken about being “pink shamed” for dressing them in pink instead of more gender-neutral colors. Perhaps pink will always carry the ability to shock. Roseberry considers that the prowess the color stands for has become even stronger over time. It is a hue ever related to power, creativity, and individuality – fit for the women of today.
Read Next: Burberry Makes History with this Groundbreaking Pledge
Originally published in the June 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

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