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Pictures: Every Celebrity Spotted On The Front Row At Paris Couture Fashion Week

Pictures: Every Celebrity Spotted On The Front Row At Paris Couture Fashion Week

Photo: Getty
This week, haute couture fashion week is taking place in all its glory in Paris. With breathtaking spectacles from the houses of Chanel, Dior, Schiaparelli and Giambattista Valli, there’s been a plethora of notable runway moments so far. The front row is just as striking.
From Keira Knightley and Marion Cotillard at Chanel, to Emma Watson and Hunter Schafer at Schiaparelli, see all the most high-profile stars attending the autumn/winter 2022 haute couture shows in Paris below.

Chiara Ferragni at Dior
Photo: Getty
Rita Ora at Schiaparelli
Photo: Getty
Emma Watson at Schiaparelli
Photo: Getty
Hunter Schafer at Schiaparelli
Photo: Getty
Karlie Kloss at Schiaparelli
Photo: Getty
Chiara Ferragni at Schiaparelli
Photo: Getty
Celeste at Dior
Photo: Getty
Julia Fox at Iris van Herpen
Photo: Getty
Sigourney Weaver at Chanel
Photo: Getty
Princess of Thailand, Sirivannavari Nariratana Rajakanya, at Chanel
Photo: Getty
Clémence Poésy at Chanel
Photo: Getty
Inès de la Fressange at Chanel

Taraji P. Henson at Chanel
Photo: Getty
Marion Cotillard at Chanel
Photo: Getty
Keira Knightley at Chanel
Photo: Getty
Soo-Joo Park at Chanel
Photo: Getty
Maggie Gyllenhaal at Chanel
Photo: Getty
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk
Read next: Amina Muaddi Put a Playful Spin on a Gray Skirt Suit at Paris Couture Week

Egyptian Soprano Farrah El-Dibany on Singing France’s National Anthem at Emmanuel Macron’s Re-Election

Egyptian Soprano Farrah El-Dibany on Singing France’s National Anthem at Emmanuel Macron’s Re-Election

El-Dibany on stage with the Macrons. Photo: Courtesy of Farrah El-Dibany
Egyptian mezzo-soprano Farrah El-Dibany was invited to perform the French national anthem ‘La Marseillaise’ at the celebration of the re-election of French president, Emmanuel Macron. The performance took place at the Champ de Mars near the Eiffel Tower on April 24 in Paris. “I was contacted by the production team behind Macron’s campaign on Saturday afternoon, asking if I could sing in the event that he won,” El-Dibany shared with Vogue Arabia. “I was in Geneva then, so I took the train Sunday morning, and as soon as I arrived, I went to the Champ de Mars to do the repetitions and to decide whether to perform with an orchestra or acapella. Monsieur and madame Macron took the decision that they preferred I sing La Marseillaise acapella.”
For the occasion, El-Dibany was dressed in a strapless metallic red gown from Gemy Maalouf’s Fall/Winter 2022-23 collection. Explaining how she came upon the selection of the dress, the singer said that she had previously seen the red number, and after the invitation, enquired whether it was available. “I immediately contacted Giorgia Viola for my look, who dressed me in Gemy Maalouf. She is a Lebanese designer whose clothes I wear whenever I can. Red was the perfect color, as the Macrons wore blue, and I was in red, and of course, it is one of the three colors of France’s flag. The dress was also validated by the Elysée.”
Photo: Getty
El-Dibany added that she was immensely moved by the invitation to perform. “What touched me the most is that I’m originally Egyptian, and not French, and for me to have the honor to be invited to sing the La Marseillaise to all of France was very moving,” she said. “President Macron thanked me warmly, but I thanked him in return, as it was such an honor for me.”
In 2005, El-Dibany entered the Arts Center of the Library of Alexandria and five years later moved to Berlin to venture into the realm of music. There, she attended the Hanns-Eislet Academy of Music and moved forward to obtain a master’s degree at the Berlin University of the Arts and a bachelor’s degree in architecture at Berlin’s Technische Universität. Hailing from Alexandria, Egypt, she became the first Arab and Egyptian opera singer to join the Academy of the National Opera in Paris in September of 2016. She has also received the prestigious Prix Lyrique de l’Arop award in 2019, marking her as the best opera singer at the hands of the Paris Opera.
Read Next: Louis Vuitton Hosted a Gala Dinner to Celebrate its Contribution to Venice’s Ca’ d’Oro’s Renovation

Exclusive: Ashi Studio’s Spring/Summer 2022 Haute Couture Collection Is Inspired by a Romantic Secret Garden

Exclusive: Ashi Studio’s Spring/Summer 2022 Haute Couture Collection Is Inspired by a Romantic Secret Garden

Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022
The city of Paris is currently abuzz with all the excitement that comes with haute couture week, and today, Paris-based Ashi Studio is all set to present its spring/summer 2022 couture collection to the world from the fashion capital. Titled ‘Heaven Scent’, the line encapsulates all that is elegant, culminating in a showcase that brings flora to life in the most unique way.
Seemingly taking inspiration from a flower-laced memory of romance, Ashi Studio’s spring/summer 2022 collection echoes the beauty of a secret garden, replete with hyacinths, jasmines, magnolias, violets, lilies, and roses. Sculpted to portray the delicate petals of blooms, the pieces in the display also come in a range of nature-inspired hues, starting with stark whites, cascading into powder pinks, earthy grays, and finally, charcoal black, all with a dose of rich scarlet thrown in for good measure. The creations from ‘Heaven Scent’ spotlight impeccable craftsmanship, evident in the light-as-air pleated pieces, dreamy feather-detailed fluttering blouses and grandiose layered gowns, all of which command attention in solid washes of color. You’ll also spot new-age hybrids in the collection, all of which was lovingly put together in Paris: a strapless red blouse making a statement with its voluminous feather train, off-shoulder capes offset with nothing but classic trousers, and dare we say ‘futuristic’ jackets with exaggerated shoulders—weightless, yet powerful.
Building up to the grand reveal, the Parisian fashion house’s Instagram page has been sharing snippets of what’s to come with the world. If you can’t wait to see the final pieces any longer, here’s a sneak peek at Ashi Studio‘s latest masterpiece.
Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022
Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022
Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022
Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022
Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022
Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022
Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022
Ashi Studio haute couture spring/summer 2022

The 12 Best Looks From Lebanese Designer Rabih Kayrouz’s Fall 2022 Collection

The 12 Best Looks From Lebanese Designer Rabih Kayrouz’s Fall 2022 Collection

Photo: Mathieu Maury
“Moved by her past, inspired by her future, and embracing the present,” is how Lebanese designer Rabih Kayrouz describes the wearer of his latest designs. In the lookbook, this is represented by the models who are almost cloaked in darkness as they step into the light.

Unveiled at a Rive Droite apartment alongside Paris couture week, the 38-piece Maison Rabih Kayrouz Fall 2022 Ready-to-Wear collection puts strong tailoring at its core through the use of the right fabric and construction. “Sharp, uncompromising cuts” are made to materials like vinyl and thick jersey to make structured dresses, jackets, and coats. In a display of skilled construction, the designer did away with padding, instead sculpting curves and creating volume by pattern-making. One of the gowns uses rope of varying lengths stitched in rings between layers of tulle to create a couture-like shape, while seams are rendered to the front, back, and sleeves of jackets to elevate them to an architectural form. Pieces range from daywear to eveningwear, in a neutral-heavy color palette with pops of bright orange and the shades of poppy and marigold mirrored in a floral print.
Take a look at the best pieces from the Maison Rabih Kayrouz Fall 2022 Ready-to-Wear collection below.
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Photo: Mathieu Maury
Read Next: The Best Street Style from the Spring 2022 Couture Shows

Let Karen Wazen’s Flirty Night-Out Look From Paris Inspire Your Next Party Outfit

Let Karen Wazen’s Flirty Night-Out Look From Paris Inspire Your Next Party Outfit

Karen Wazen in Paris. Photo: Instagram.com/karenwazen
Karen Wazen has touched down in Paris, and has been dressing in a series of enviable looks, as is expected from the fashion week fixture. After wearing a head-to-toe Dior ensemble for the maison’s Spring/Summer 2022 couture show during the day, the entrepreneur switched things up in what could be a night-out look straight out of Emily in Paris.
Photo: Instagram.com/karenwazen
Wazen wore the Bianca dress by influencer-loved Instagram retailer Opposite Attracts; a minimalistic satin number in dark blue. The dress featured a high cowl neck and extra-long sleeves, which contrasted against her daring thigh-high slit going into an asymmetric hem. She elevated the dress with footwear from her sister Andrea Wazen’s namesake brand, picking the party-appropriate Kay heel with a clear PVC front and adorned with a Swarovski bow knot. Complementing the dazzle in her footwear and adding a touch of high fashion to her ensemble, Wazen’s arm candy of choice was the coveted Micro Lady Dior Bag in silver. She wore her hair up in a high chignon, making room for her Chiara Ferragni diamond hoop earrings to shine through. In the pictures, shared with her 7.1 million followers on Instagram, Wazen can be seen posing with the Eiffel Tower lit up in blue in the background, matching her dress perfectly.

This fashion week was a particularly special one for Wazen, as it marked her first one since becoming the first Middle Eastern to front a global Roberto Cavalli campaign. While the mother-of-three has left Paris to return to her family in Dubai, she has indeed served up enough inspiration with her contrasting day and night looks during her sojourn in the city.
Read Next: Karen Wazen Becomes the First Middle Eastern To Front a Global Campaign for Roberto Cavalli

All the Highlights You Missed From Chanel’s 2021/22 Métiers D’art Collection

All the Highlights You Missed From Chanel’s 2021/22 Métiers D’art Collection

The house of Chanel always celebrates craft. And its new métiers d’art show, which took place just days ago in Paris was simply a love letter to craft. The showcase took place in Le 19M, the palatial Rudy Ricciotti-designed building owned by the Chanel house that regroups in one space the most refined French artisans, from sequin embroiderers to feather trimmers and from master shoe makers.
What does 19M stands for? The number signifies the district where the building is located, and also happens to be Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel’s date of birth (August 19, 1883). As for the ‘M’, it symbolizes the three French words in the essence of craft: ‘mode’ (fashion), ‘mains’ (hands) and ‘metiers d’art’. The building was the main inspiration behind Viard’s collection. Its graphic white concrete shell, representing giant threads, was echoed in the embroidered pockets of the elongated black tweed coats that opened the show. Dense sequinned embroideries evoked graffiti patterns and deconstructed Cs (emblems of the maison), while baggy knit shorts and layers of gold chains gave a nod to streetwear culture.
The showcase also championed outerwear with tweed coats twinkling with silver sequins, ruffle-edge jeans and CC-logo pants. Cozy cardigans with big patch pockets and a tweed bomber jacket with sweatshirt sleeves embroidered with pearls brought a laidback finish to the brand’s elegant aesthetic.
It’s safe to say that Viard’s latest creations take tweed to the streets, putting a youthful lens on the French luxury house with a special kind of finesse. Below, check out some of the most interesting looks from the
with a finesse that only the Taking the tweed to the street only proves the youth oriented vision that Viard has for the house 2021/2022 métiers d’art show.

Everything to Know About Thierry Mugler’s First Exhibition in Paris

Everything to Know About Thierry Mugler’s First Exhibition in Paris

A visionary couturier who came to fame nearly five decades ago, Thierry Mugler – who retired from fashion in 2002 – is celebrated in an exhibition in Paris that delves into his fascinating creative universe.
Thierry Mugler with models at his SS1999 show. Photo: Getty Images
For years, Thierry Mugler refused all the major museums that wanted to host exhibitions on his work. He was not interested in opening his archives or looking back. When Babeth Djian asked Thierry-Maxime Loriot – who had curated Jean Paul Gaultier and Peter Lindbergh exhibitions – if he wanted to create a show on the French couturier, he jumped at the chance and approached Mugler with his vision. Instead of focusing on the past, Loriot took a different approach, imagining how Mugler would be presented today. “I thought it was impossible, but he changed his mind,” Loriot says.
La Chimère Collection, Haute Couture FW1998. Photo: Courtesy
Thierry Mugler: Couturissime, which opened in 2019 at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, is now headed for the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris this month. It showcases a holistic creative universe, rather than serving as a chronological retrospective. “The concept came quite easily as Mugler had strong themes in his work,” Loriot explains. Mugler was open to seeing how he would be placed in context with collaborators like artists Michel Lemieux and Philipp Fürhofer, and Montreal-based special effects studio Rodeo FX, which created a gallery projected from a computer-generated forest. Maison Mugler and Clarins Group maintained the archives when Mugler left and the exhibition also includes exceptional loans from the Centre national du costume de scène in France for the Lady Macbeth costumes and other lenders like Neil Tennant from the Pet Shop Boys.
David Bowie in the video for Tin Machine’s song “You Belong in Rock ’n’ Roll” wearing Les Cow-boys collection Prêt-à-Porter SS1992 Photo: Brian Aris / ArisPrints 2017
Les Insectes Collection Haute Couture SS1997, Rubber suit, “tire” effect collaboration with Abel Villarreal. Photo: Patrice Stable
Organized in several acts like a classical opera, the exhibition presents some of the creations that solidified Mugler as one of the most daring fashion designers of his time, from the 1970s to 2002, including pieces worn by Kim Kardashian on the September 2019 cover of Vogue Arabia. With 95% of the pieces never having been exhibited or seen by the public, Couturissime gives visitors the opportunity to experience haute couture through timeless works that defied trends. The Insect and Chimères Collection – characterized by futuristic silhouettes with piercing shoulders, plunging décolletés, and surreal hourglass waistlines – and the Maschinenmensch Collection (“machine-human”) – presented with fully articulated robotic armor – prove that for the couturier, fashion goes far beyond wearing a beautiful outfit. “I wanted to get to the bottom of things, like music that needs tempo, a staging that needs rhythms,” Mugler says. “It was a ricochet that inspired me from one collection to the other.”
Emma Sjöberg wearing Les cow-boys collection Prêt -à-Porter SS1992 in the video for George Michael’s song “too funky,” directed by Thierry Mugler. Photo: Patrice Stable
Anniversaire Des 20 Ans Collection Haute Couture FW1996. Photo: Helmut Newton
A true and singular artist, Mugler was born in the French Alsatian town of Strasbourg in 1948. He studied classical dance as a child and his passion for performance would ultimately permeate his entire career. He went on to study interior design and moved to Paris at 24, where he started making clothes for a boutique. He created his first personal collection a few years after and never stopped designing for nearly 50 years – the fruit of this labor amounted to no fewer than 10 000 pieces. Loriot had the mammoth task of narrowing the collection down to 150 for this exhibition. “It is a mix of ‘best of,’ surprises and classics, including Mugler’s use of non-couture materials like rubber, PVC, and plastic blended with precious materials,” the curator says. “Mugler also basically invented the format of fashion shows as we know them today. Before him they were presentations. Courrèges brought music to fashion presentations in the 1960s, but Mugler developed the idea of staging fashion, having themes, groups of models, guest stars, singers, storylines, and a soundtrack made for the collection. That is what made him stand out from everybody else. Mugler created his own image, his own world, and he even made a show open to the public, which was a first in France in 1984.”
Iman in the Prêt-à-Porter SS1983 show. Photo: Getty Images
Prêt-à-Porter SS1983. Photo: Getty Images
Curating the photography for the exhibition was another challenge. “Most photographers went digital around 2003-2004. Mugler stopped doing fashion in the years before,” remembers Loriot. “It was a tour de force to go to all the photographers and ask them to dig through negatives to find the right images that had been forgotten. Some had been sent to magazines and the negatives never returned.” The result is more than worth it. Some of the greatest masters of photography are featured in the new exhibition catalogue made for the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, such as Helmut Newton, Herb Ritts, Guy Bourdin, Ellen von Unwerth, Lillian Bassman, Inez & Vinoodh, Paolo Roversi, and Steven Klein.
Loriot recalls Mugler’s reaction when the exhibition was unveiled. “It was the first time he had seen all his work gathered together. It was very moving – a lifetime of creation. But don’t get me wrong, he is not nostalgic at all of his past, he’s looking forward and was thinking about how he would make these creations today and modify them.”
Eva Herzigova in the Prêt-à-Porter FW1996 show. Photo: Getty Images
Spirale Futuriste Collection, Prêt-à- Porter FW1980. Photo: Peter Knapp
While the fashion world sometimes seems reserved for the happy few, this exhibition makes it accessible to a broader audience. “The ones I want to convince are people like your father, brother, or neighbor,” comments Loriot. “Those who do not care about fashion or think it’s crazy.” He hopes they will discover a universe that thrives on creativity and craftsmanship, and stimulates on every level.
Read Next: Manfred Thierry Mugler Shares on “Muglerizing” Kim Kardashian West for Her First Vogue Arabia Cover
Originally published in the September 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

Karl Lagerfeld’s Personal Items and Art to Be Auctioned Soon

Karl Lagerfeld’s Personal Items and Art to Be Auctioned Soon

At the end of the Chanel Haute Couture Fall 2017 show, Karl Lagerfeld was awarded the Grand Vermeil Medal by Mayor Anne Hidalgo
Items that once belonged to late designer Karl Lagerfeld are set to be auctioned across Europe. In a series of eight auctions, Sotheby’s will sell his estate which includes collectibles, fine art, furniture, personal items, and the possessions of his beloved cat Choupette.
Lagerfeld at Chanel’s Pre-Fall 2017 show, walking with Hudson Kroenig, the son of Brad Kroenig – one of Lagerfeld’s long-standing muses-in the Chanel SS 2011 show. Hudson walked with Lagerfeld during his last runway for Chanel.
The auction house stated, “Sotheby’s is paying tribute to this genius of a designer with the sale of over 1000 lots from his residences in France and Monaco, an anthology of his personal taste but also of his life and career. Divided between Monaco, Paris, and Cologne, the sales are in his image, multiple and surprising, telling the story of the couturier, the collector, the decorator, and the photographer.”
Carla Fendi, Life President of the Board of Directors for the Fendi Group of companies with Creative Director of Fendi, Karl Lagerfeld, 1992. Getty
Noteworthy items include art from Takashi Murakami, champagne buckets by Martin Margiela, chrome dumbbells by Aston Martin, a Zenith Chair by Marc Newson, as well as the famed Jeff Koons painting Dom Perignon Balloon Venus. Also on auction are his personal items such as linens, and Rolls Royce cars. The clothing lot includes his trademark fingerless gloves, suit jackets, and accessories from designers Yves Saint Laurent, Dior, Comme des Garçons, and a jar containing starched, white collars synonymous with Lagerfeld’s distinct personal style.
Lagerfeld was the creative director of Chanel, from 1983 till his passing in 2019. Alongside that, he also had his highly regarded eponymous label and was also the creative director at Fendi.  The auctions for his items will be commencing in Monaco from December 3-5, Paris on December 14-15, and Cologne, with dates yet to be announced for the same. There will also be an online auction with two sessions from November 26 to December 6, and December 6-16.
Read Next: Karl Lagerfeld: Get to Know the Man Behind the Platinum Ponytail

The Best Street Style at the Fall 2021 Couture Shows in Paris

The Best Street Style at the Fall 2021 Couture Shows in Paris

Photographed by Acielle / Style du Monde
Sixteen months after the pandemic hit Europe, the fall 2021 couture shows mark our semi-official “return” to live and in-person fashion shows. Many of us will still be viewing the collections online—we’re extra excited about Pieter Mulier’s debut at Alaïa and Demna Gvasalia’s first couture collection for Balenciaga—but for those lucky enough to attend IRL, the inevitable question is: What to wear? Will editors and influencers dust off the runway pieces and heels in the back of their closets, or will they be influenced by the casual, experimental looks we saw outside the menswear shows? Style du Monde’s Acielle is on the ground in Paris to find out. Scroll through her latest street style photos below, and come back for her daily updates.

Read Next: 5 Things to Know About Pieter Mulier’s First Show for Alaïa
Originally published on Vogue.com

Paris Hails a Bombastic New Shopping Address with the Reopening of La Samaritaine

Paris Hails a Bombastic New Shopping Address with the Reopening of La Samaritaine

Inside La Samaritaine – Paris. Courtesy Karla Otto
Before French President Emmanuel Macron met with Justin Bieber and his wife Hailey, at the Elysées Palace in Paris, he was alongside LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault to cut the proverbial ribbon on one of the most beloved department stores in all of France. The reopening of la Samaritaine—affectionately referred to as “la Samar” by Parisians—has finally occurred, 16 years after closing for renovations.
La Samaritaine Paris. Photo by Matthieu Salvaing. Courtesy Karla Otto
The department store is featured in a 1907 steel frame and glass Art Nouveau building by Belgian architect Frantz Jourdain that overlooks the Seine on the right bank in the 1st arrondissement. It is listed as a historical monument by the French Ministry of Culture since 1990. La Samaritaine houses the French art de vivre, which translates to shopping, eating, and culture. No less than X fashion houses are curated to offer a very French mix and match style–think Alaïa, Loewe, Alexander McQueen, Chloé, Chanel, but also regional names like Shourouk and Vanina are alongside a blend of Scandi-cool brands like Ganni, Rotate, and Rains. Meanwhile, avant-garde Parisian sneaker brand Shinzo Paris offers a unique concept featuring 100 m2 of exclusive, ethical, and responsible sneakers, each one fulfilling one of their five criteria: local, recycled, vegan, organic, or reconditioned. Look closely and shoppers will see there are many limited editions and previews available to La Samaritaine along with what is the biggest beauty space in Europe exclusively featuring Dolce & Gabbana Beauty, Helena Rubinstein, Clé de Peau Beauté, SK-II, Fragonard, Orveda, and Sulwhasoo. There are also five beauty spaces including a spa and a house of perfume.
La Samaritaine beauty space. Photo by Matthieu Salvaing. Courtesy Karla Otto
There are 12 spaces to eat everything from caviar to burgers, while books by Assouline and a pop-up Perrotin Gallery will seduce tourists and Parisians alike. Take the elevators to the top to witness the spectacular Art Nouveau peacock fresco restored to its former glory. At 3.5 meters high and 115 meters long, it is the work of the architect Jourdain’s son Francis. Alternatively, shoppers can also climb the 270 original oak steps . The railing has been restored with 16000 gold leaves. The artist Francis was also commissioned by his father to decorate the store facade with enameled Volvic lava that serve to soften the structure. Adding a touch of contemporary architecture are the glass waves forming the facade of the Rivoli street side designed by Japanese architects of the Sanaa agency.
For a lucky few, after a full day of shopping and sightseeing, La Samaritaine is adjoined by a Cheval Blanc Paris hotel, complete with a Dior Spa.
READ NEXT: The Hindame jacket rolls into the Victoria & Albert museum

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