Paris Haute Couture Week

5 Things to Know about Elie Saab’s Blossoming Fall 2021-22 Couture Collection

5 Things to Know about Elie Saab’s Blossoming Fall 2021-22 Couture Collection

Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
While blooms and flowers may not come to mind for fall/winter collections, Elie Saab‘s couture creations have always brought about escapism. For his latest, the Lebanese couturier aimed to manifest the world as he sees it and as he wants it to be.
Here, five things to know about Elie Saab’s fall/winter 2021-22 couture collection.

The collection is inspired by Impressionist observations
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
The designer is an Impressionist at heart, and much like his other collections, he expresses his perceptions of nature rather than creating exact representations in this line, depicting tacit imperatives of taste and conscience through the pieces.
The collection’s muse is blooming flora
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
Nature-inspired elements dominate the collection through foliage headpieces and rose-bow belts. Blush plissé is layered into spherical silhouettes to resemble petals while a celestial blue bride dress is embroidered with floral lace.
The collection emanates a perennial hope
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
Each gown is sewn with flower patterns that symbolize a future abundant with possibility, signaling that it is time to achieve, prosper, and blossom. Embroidered buds and branches that emerge and unfold across each piece are emblematic of rebirth and renewal, in hope of a better tomorrow.
The collection combines bold colors with light pastels
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
Bold taffeta asymmetric gowns with oversized off-the-shoulder in saturated reds, blues, pinks and plum, fade into soft off-white and pastel crepe capes. Feathers of every color flutter to create bouquets ballgowns and bombers that rustle and sway, evoking windy fields of flowers.
The couture has fresh textures and volumes
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
Beaded petals vine through pastel muslins and organza, redefining feminine curves. Black and red velvets hug contours in alternating waves of opaque and transparency, with layers of chartreuse silk. Three-dimensional flowers stem out of neck and shoulder lines, adding to the collection’s lavish textures and rich volumes.
Read Next: 5 Things to Know About Rami Al Ali’s Unabashedly “Seductive” Fall 2021 Couture Collection

All the Highlights from Day Two of Paris Haute Couture Week Fall/Winter 21-22

All the Highlights from Day Two of Paris Haute Couture Week Fall/Winter 21-22

Armani Privé, Ronald Van der Kemp, Chanel
The world’s most skilled designers continue to present their latest masterpieces in a combination of both virtual and physical shows in Paris. Read on for more highlights from day two of haute couture week and check back for more updates.

Ronald Van der Kemp

Ronald Van der Kemp’s 35 pieces in this fall 2021 couture collection are rarer than ever. The Dutch designer known for being a sustainability advocate created the collection with used denim, felted textile trash, and recycled fabrics proving that sustainability can look modern and timeless.

“It’s also a sort of a metaphor of a clean slate from where to start anew after all we’ve been though,” said Alexandre Vauthier about his fall 2021 couture collection. The pieces unveiled, are sprinkled with crystals in a monochrome palette belonging in the dream closet of every woman. From feathered ponchos, embroidered black leather perfectos to sequined bodysuits and see-through pleated chiffon capes, Vauthier once again balanced dramatic access and sophisticated restraint.
Chanel

Virginie Viard took us back to the 30s in Chanel’s fall 2021 haute couture collection. The pieces were characterized by a lightness of touch, inspired by impressionist artist Berthe Morisot and the Cubist Marie Laurencin. Bouffant skirts made from nothing else but tweed are married with delicate bustiers of pale pink embroidery or delicate lace in addition to Viard’s “little deshabilles” lingerie-like pieces. To end the collection on a high note, the bridal look personified by Margaret Qualley in soft pink satin worn with a dreamy sequined veil transported us to the era of Gabrielle Chanel.
Armani Privé

Powerful, bold, and colorful, Armani Privé’s collection called Shine included all the colors of the rainbow; hints of red, blue, green, splashes of pink and purple. This year’s fall (which may look like spring to some) couture collection incorporated mercurial silk organza that moved effortlessly and fluid-like across the runway, as well as elegant and playful draped chiffon, and tulle dresses. The fresh, glowy pastel palette was seen throughout the show, from feathered jackets, to flowing silk gowns.
Read Next: All the Highlights from Day One of Paris Haute Couture Week Fall/Winter 21-22

5 Things to Know About Georges Hobeika’s Liberating Fall 2021 Couture Collection

5 Things to Know About Georges Hobeika’s Liberating Fall 2021 Couture Collection

Photo: Courtesy of Georges Hobeika
Inspired by the 60s, Lebanese designer Georges Hobeika’s couture fall/winter 2021-22 collection fuses a vintage, retro spirit with the flair of a 20th-century decade of recklessness. Read on for five things you must know about the minimally extravagant line.

The collection brings back the spirit of dressing up
Photo: Courtesy of Georges Hobeika
As lockdowns ease around the world, the collection reflects haute couture’s power to induce the fantasy of a pre-pandemic “normal,” defined by a life of freedom and the spirit of dressing up.
The collection is named after the Mod movement of the sixties
Photo: Courtesy of Georges Hobeika
Named ‘Mod’, collection draws inspiration from a movement which emerged in London in the early 1960s. The Modernists were an aspirational subculture of young men and women who dressed smartly and beautifully as a statement of rebellion against the austerity of their parent’s generation, helping define the average teenager. A host of silhouettes develop from this festive era, from coat to sheath, accompanied by harmonious lines and delicate details.
The collection incorporates a wintery color palette
Photo: Courtesy of Georges Hobeika
The Maison’s Paris atelier tames precious fabrics illuminated by the soft lights of a winter sun, reminding us of the holiday season with hues such as muted yellows and frosty blues. Sophisticated embroideries compose patterns inspired by nature on waves of organza.
The collection combines Hobeika’s signature high couture leitmotifs with a fresh look
Photo: Courtesy of Georges Hobeika
The emblematic signature of the fashion house is expressed by associations of feathers and sparkling crystals, but also by outfits shrouded in mystery and sobriety that carry a new glance on high couture.
The collection is dedicated to every woman in the world
Photo: Courtesy of Georges Hobeika
The collection illustrates a dynamism allowing all variations, where it is between transparency or modesty, simplicity or sumptuousness, and modern or classic. Described as “a universal hymn to life, grace, and lightness,” the capsule is a tribute to all women of all generations.
Read Next: Everything You Need to Know About the FW21 Haute Couture Shows

The Best Bridal Looks from Paris’s Haute Couture Week SS21

The Best Bridal Looks from Paris’s Haute Couture Week SS21

Luxurious silk, frothy tulle, and delicate lacework — behold the best bridal dresses from this year’s couture catwalk.
Courtesy of Fendi

As fashion season kicked into high gear with Paris’s Haute Couture Week SS21, we were taken into high-glamour fairytales told through fashion films and digital shows, such as Dior‘s mesmerising exploration of self through tarot card characters and Valentino‘s mix of royalty and club-kid punk.
Throughout the week, we’ve witnessed couture’s exciting bridal transformations, including layers upon layers of tulle at Giambattista Valli and ruffle collars at Alexandre Vauthier. Meanwhile, the art of storytelling was transformed as shows fully immersed their virtual audience in beauty and elegance (think of Virginie Viard’s finale where the Chanel bride — wearing a silk-embellished, white-buttoned gown — rode in on a white horse). Aptly, this year’s offerings brought us creations that reinforce the purity of human connection and the emotion of being together — all of which we will hopefully be able to experience again, soon.
From Valentino to Fendi, these are the best bridal looks from Paris’s Haute Couture Week SS21.
1. Valentino
Courtesy of Valentino

2. Fendi
Courtesy of Fendi

3. Giambattista Valli
Courtesy of Giambattista Valli

4. Giambattista Valli
Courtesy of Giambattista Valli

5. Chanel
Courtesy of Chanel

6. Chanel
Courtesy of Chanel

8. Alexandre Vauthier
Courtesy of Alexandre Vauthier

9. Antonio Grimaldi 
Courtesy of Antonio Grimaldi

10. Antonio Grimaldi
Courtesy of Antonio Grimaldi

11. Dior
Photo: Elina Kechicheva. Courtesy of Dior

12. Dior
Photo: Elina Kechicheva. Courtesy of Dior

13. Armani Privé
Courtesy of Armani Privé

14. Viktor & Rolf
Courtesy of Viktor & Rolf

Read Next: All the Highlights from Day Three of Paris Haute Couture Week Spring/Summer 2021
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s Breathtaking Debut Fendi Couture Show

5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s Breathtaking Debut Fendi Couture Show

Courtesy of Fendi

Kim Jones’s Fendi couture debut is an homage to “strong women, intelligent women, who know what they’re doing in their lives. Pioneering women, like the Bloomsbury women, like the women in the show,” the designer told British Vogue’s Olivia Singer during an exclusive preview. The multi-layered spectacle, inspired by feminist literary icons and four generations of Fendi women alike, is a celebration of everything Jones stands for as a designer.
Here, five things to know about his fusion of British romance and Italian grandeur.
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

Kim Jones drew inspiration from the pioneering Bloomsbury Group
With a rich tapestry of disparate cultural experiences to draw from, during a youth spent between England and Africa, Jones landed on Firle, a quaint village in East Sussex. Specifically, Charleston, the modernist home of the Bloomsbury Group. “I like how this family of people – and particularly these two pioneering sisters, Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf – moved things forward,” explains Jones. “I admire the way that they lived their lives, the freedom that they created for themselves and the art that they left behind for the world.” His deeply personal Fendi couture debut marries the romantic British sensibility of the Bloomsbury set with the heritage of the Italian house in a collection that’s rich with references. The most breathtaking? The embroidered embellishments on gowns, inspired by Charleston’s painted murals and realised in thousands of bouquets of organza petals and Murano glass beaded flowers.
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

An exhibition of Bloomsbury Group books and ephemera complements the show
The show’s accompanying literary exhibition, curated by Sammy Jay of Peter Harrington Rare Books, sheds more light on the parallels between the Bloomsbury Group and Fendi’s Rome HQ (Bell, for example, channelled her love for Italian Classicism into frescoes of the Borghese gardens on the walls of Charleston). From a rare first edition of resident Charlestonian TS Eliot’s The Waste Land, to the first ever copy of Woolf’s Orlando read by Vita Sackville-West, the paramour who inspired the novel, the curiosity cabinets will delight anyone who has ever pored over Woolf’s time-travelling explorations of gender and identity – once it is open to the public, that is. “I wanted to look at different points of time in Fendi – which is why Orlando came into my head,” Jones told British Vogue of the formative influence of the seminal literary love letter. “I wanted to pull out points of reference from Karl [Lagerfeld, former Fendi womenswear creative director], but renew them. To look at them in a lighter way, to see them with a new eye, but without it appearing nostalgic.”
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

The casting was major
Jones’s female fan base, from Bella Hadid and Cara Delevingne to Naomi Campbell, naturally came together for their friend’s career-defining fashion show. Leading the charge were Kate Moss and her daughter Lila Grace; and Adwoa Aboah, another muse behind Jones’s Fendi vision, and her sister Kesewa. “What I love most about Kim is his ability to bring family wherever he goes,” says Aboah. “He keeps such a wide range of people around him – artists, musicians, the youth, everyone – which is why his work continues to remain so relevant.” Rounding out the cast? Demi Moore, Christy Turlington and her nephew, James.
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

The Fendi family walked through a Fendi maze
The Mosses, Turlingtons and Aboahs walked between a grid of interlocking Fs before standing in individual glass units – some of which bloomed with flowers in homage to Sissinghurst Garden Castle, which once belonged to Sackville-West. Others housed giant Stone Pines – the parasol-shaped trees commonly found in Rome – while a number were grounded by glossy marble floors inspired by the Borghese gallery. Adding to the atmospheric quality of the live stream was the supremely moving Max Richter soundtrack. The British-German composer enlisted Silvia Venturini Fendi – who expressed how happy she is to be working with Jones – Isabella Rossellini, Christina Ricci, Moss and Aboah to read passages of love letters from Vita and Virginia, before soundtracking them to new music inspired by Woolf’s body of work. This complete ode to the pioneering Bloomsbury women and the individuals walking in the show could not have been more detailed.
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

Kate Moss consulted on the accessories
“Kate has such immaculate taste – she’s seen everything, and her knowledge of fashion is so vast,” Jones said of the “logical” decision to appoint Moss as a Fendi accessories consultant. From the blush silk boots hand-embroidered with beads, micro-pearls and glass micro-sequins, to the Murano glass and crystal ear cuffs – the fruits of jewellery creative director Delfina Delettrez Fendi’s work – painstakingly crafted accessories added an exquisite artistic element to the collection, while remaining wearable. As Kate herself says, “What Kim does is always very cool and modern. He knows exactly what people want to wear.”
Read Next: All the Highlights from Day Two of Paris Haute Couture Week Spring/Summer 2021
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

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