Lama Jouni

Lady Gaga Wears Lebanese Designer Lama Jouni in Her Latest Instagram Video

Lady Gaga Wears Lebanese Designer Lama Jouni in Her Latest Instagram Video

Photo: Instagram.com/ladygaga
Lady Gaga is no stranger to Middle Eastern designers. Just months ago, the music icon was spotted out and about in New York post her performance with Tony Bennett at Radio City Music Hall in a sparkling gunmetal Georges Hobeika gown, her first ensemble by the celebrated Lebanese designer. And over the years, her loyalty to the creations of Tunisian couturier Azzedine Alaïa hasn’t been missed either. Most recently, Gaga gave her nod to artists of the region once again via a video she shared on her official Instagram page.

On November 21, Lady Gaga took to social media to announce a new launch—the Italian Glam Highlighter Brush from her beauty line, Haus Laboratories by Lady Gaga. In the first look, a smouldering Gaga is seen showing off the results of her latest drop dressed in a risqué off-shoulder black dress by none other than Dubai-based, Lebanese-born designer Lama Jouni. Gaga paired her fail-safe ebony number with sparkling solitaire earrings, a statement cocktail ring, and a sleek beauty look. Her picks: coral lips, softly smoked out lids, and an elegant low bun. The video announcing the new highlighter brush has already earned thousands of likes and comments, with Jouni fans instantly recognizing the designer’s feminine and understated ensemble.
After attending Istituto Marangoni, Lama Jouni also studied fashion at Parsons, Paris, and went on to work with Balmain and Reed Krakoff. The designer launched her own ready-to-wear label in November 2013, and today is counted among the favorites in the region. Check out the very same dress worn by Lady Gaga below. 
Photo: Lama Jouni
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These Regional Designers Have Joined Forces to Dress Women of All Sizes

These Regional Designers Have Joined Forces to Dress Women of All Sizes

In the name of inclusivity, Dima Ayad asks regional designers to dress women of all sizes. Will they be up for the challenge?
From left: Lama Jouni, Reema Al Banna, Laura Leonide, Dima Ayad, and Mariam Yeya. Photographed by Rudolf Azzi for Vogue Arabia September 2021Dubai-based womenswear designer Dima Ayad tells a story many can relate to. Traveling abroad to attend a wedding, upon arrival she discovered that her bag had been lost along the way. She headed to the city to pick out a new dress, only to discover that women of all sizes were not all being catered to. Miserable, Ayad returned home, deciding to overlook the wedding altogether.
Dima Ayad and Laura Leonide wearing Dima Ayad. Photographed by Rudolf Azzi
“The lack of availability of clothes for an oversized person is frustrating,” Ayad says. “You go to the mall and find just one store that sells oversized clothes. But we each have a style that needs to be catered to.” Even exercise clothes are regularly off-limits. “If an oversized woman wants to exercise, she will not be able to find anything to wear, even something as simple as leggings. Some big brands are working on this, but barely.”
Laura Leonide and Lama Jouni wearing Lama Jouni. Photographed by Rudolf Azzi
Ayad is determined to redress the balance and her frustration is fuelling the launch of her new sportswear and leisure brand. Unflinching in her belief that all women deserve to wear exquisitely crafted clothes, she reached out to her peers and friends Reema Al Banna of Reemami, Lama Jouni, and Mariam Yeya of Mrs Keepa to join her on this journey towards inclusivity. While not everyone she approached could get involved, the ones who did, did so with gusto. “It’s not that designers are not keen, it’s all supply and demand,” remarks Egyptian-French designer Mariam Yeya of Mrs Keepa, a longtime friend of Ayad’s. “We launched a collection and we don’t provide size; most of the collection is on a preorder basis. People are free to order what they want. The biggest one I have received is a size 44. I don’t think that the designer should be blamed for not being inclusive, it’s also down to the buyers from big department stores. Most often they choose the sizes and collection and they rarely ask for bigger sizes.”
Laura Leonide wearing Lama Jouni. Photographed by Rudolf Azzi
Ayad explains, “I asked Mariam to be part of this journey with me, because she shares the same values in the fashion space as I do but also because when you see Mrs Keepa’s design aesthetic, you wouldn’t imagine it suiting larger-sized women.” Yeya agrees, “The brand’s aesthetics are very eclectic, avant garde, and with big silhouettes. I always say that there’s a thin line between something looking good on and it making the person look funny. I don’t do big sizes, not because I don’t want to include every shape, but because the brand DNA won’t look flattering. I go all out with my creativity, with print, drapery, and asymmetry, and everything has to fit properly.”
Laura Leonide and Mariam Yeya wearing Mrs Keepa. Photographed by Rudolf Azzi
Not unlike Mrs Keepa, at first glance, Lama Jouni may come across as a strange choice for this collaboration, since she’s known for her formfitting pieces. Jouni’s clients are often photographed flaunting muscle definition through her peek-a-boo clothes. “Body confidence with your curves is the right thing to do,” affirms Ayad. “I think it’s time that we show that anyone can wear Lama Jouni.” The Lebanese designer concurs. “I always admire women who know what they want and work toward that goal. I like to work with people who challenge me. Dima is one designer who inspires me so much.” Accustomed to creating for an athletically honed clientele, Jouni confesses that dressing larger silhouettes was a challenge. “I’m not shy to admit that my knowledge isn’t that strong when it comes to larger sizes. It was a great introduction to start thinking of women of all sizes, especially when my strength is in creating essential wear,” she says. Jouni’s piece is entirely her style. Designed for Ayad’s body, it’s form-fitted, a touch revealing in the right places, and incredibly flattering. The positioning of the straps is perhaps the only giveaway that this piece represents a departure from the norm. Vogue Arabia Fashion Prize winner Reema Al Banna, the designer behind Reemami, was particularly taken with the idea of creating a unique blazer featuring her signature prints. The jacket features a shoulder cut-out with trims along the sleeves; something that’s become a hallmark of Al Banna’s work. Tailored pants complete the look. The suit is a Reemami classic, but for a fuller frame, and it works perfectly.
Laura Leonide and Reema Al Banna wearing Reemami. Photographed by Rudolf Azzi
“Dressing Dima is amazing, as she embodies strength, confidence, and femininity,” says Al Banna. “I love and support the noise she’s creating around embracing and supporting all body types, which is also ingrained in Reemami.” Observing her flowing dress with white and green teardrop shapes that accentuate the form, designer Yeya proclaims, “I don’t believe in inclusive design. I believe that – individually – we all have different body types and the DNA of Mrs Keepa caters to that.” Ayad hopes that this coming together of some of the most talented designers in the Middle East will challenge conventions and assumptions, while also turning heads. The fashion industry has always catered to an ideal – and one that few women ever reach. Ayad and her collaborators are already thinking about dressing women of all sizes. The aim is that the pieces that emerge from this blending of talent will inspire others to continue to change how and for whom they design, offering all women an opportunity to dress themselves in a manner that reflects both body and spirit.
Laura Leonide wearing Reemami. Photographed by Rudolf Azzi
Read Next: Meet the Arab Women of Determination Giving a Deeper Meaning to Body Positivity
Originally published in the September 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia
Style: Amine JreissatiHair: Natalie CropperMakeup: Bethany Lea PentelowMakeup assistant: Kerris CharlesProduction: Ankita Chandra

Salma Abu Deif Nails Summer Chic in a Series of Standout Dresses

Salma Abu Deif Nails Summer Chic in a Series of Standout Dresses

With holiday mode officially in full swing, celebrities are giving us serious summer-style inspiration. On the lookout for a neon swimsuit? A dress for a sunset session? A baseball cap or bucket hat? A quick scroll will reveal who is wearing what and where.

Take for example fashion-conscious Egyptian actor Salma Abu Deif, who has been making the most of her summer days in style. Her fashion choices include a stunning royal blue dress with cut-out details, a print mini with bolero sleeves, and a timeless black floor-length gown with a thigh-high slit.

Print, bold colors and maxi dresses are go-to options this summer, whether you’re heading out for a brunch or a sunset party by the beach. Look to Lama Jouni’s body-con midi dress, Zimmermann’s chiffon mini (perfect for a day picnic), and Alexandre Vauthier’s metallic flecked gown (for an elegant dinner with friends) – dresses that combine versatility and longtime appeal. Paired with the right accessories, you’re all set to look your very best this summer.
Scroll through to see 10 of our dresses inspired by Salma Abu Deif’s summer style…
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Announcing the Winner of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered by NEOM

Announcing the Winner of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered by NEOM

2020 Vogue Fashion Prize winner, Mohamed Benchellal. Photographed by Michel Takla for Vogue Arabia

After weeks of excitement and anticipation, the finale of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, powered by NEOM has arrived. This year’s prize returned bigger and better than ever before, highlighting sustainability at its core and looking to empower some of the region’s most talented designers. From more than 250 people across 20 countries applying to be part of the illustrious program, only 10 finalists were carefully selected.
Over the past three weeks, finalists Karim Adduchi, Yousef Akbar, Benchellal, Jude Benhalim, Born In Exile, Emergency Room, Harithand, Lama Jouni, Lurline, and Ilyes Ouali have been preparing for the final stages of the Vogue Fashion Prize.
With the immense talents of all the finalists, the jury was faced with an almost impossible decision: who out of these vast talents could win? However, a decision was made with the winner revealed at an intimate gala held at the Armani Hotel in Dubai.
The evening honored this year’s finalists and saw Moroccan couture womenswear designer Benchellal crowned as the winner of this year’s Vogue Fashion Prize. Karim Adduchi was named as first runner-up, with Lurline and Lama Jouni both placing as second runners-up.
“It was an incredible honor to receive so many applications to the Fashion Prize this year from all over the world, and to be joined by a prestigious jury featuring some of the most iconic names in the fashion industry,” said Manuel Arnaut, Editor-in-Chief of Vogue Arabia. “This unique combination enabled us to continue to deliver one of Vogue Arabia’s core aims: being at the center of the fashion ecosystem in the Arab world by nurturing its emerging designers. Thank you to our partner NEOM, with whom we created a beautiful narrative around sustainability, and congratulations to all of the finalists and winners.”
Here is all you need to know about this year’s winners.
Winner: Benchellal
Benchellal. Photographed by Michel Takla for Vogue Arabia

Moroccan designer Mohamed Benchellal has been named as the winner for the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize with his couture womenswear label Benchellal.
Holding sustainability at the core of the brand, Benchellal impressed the jury with his contemporary yet timeless designs that exude the ultimate sense of glamour. “If I win the Vogue Fashion Prize, the prize would not be for me. The prize would be for all those women who feel empowered, beautiful, and elegant dressed in Benchellal,” the designer previously said.
Benchellal will receive a financial grant valued at US $150,000, alongside editorial/press, marketing, and mentorship, as well as a placement on Net-a-Porter.
First runner-up: Karim Adduchi
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize first runner-up, Karim Adduchi. Photographed by Michel Takla for Vogue Arabia

Moroccan-born artist and designer Karim Adduchi is the first runner-up of this year’s prize. He presented his impressive and unique creations – drawn from the inspiration of his rich heritage – to acclaim from the jury. Karim Adduchi will receive a financial grant of US $50,000 to further develop his couture womenswear label.
Joint second runner-up: Lurline
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize joint second runners-up Sarah and Siham Albinali of Lurline

Sisters Sarah and Siham Albinali of Saudi Arabian ready-to-wear label Lurline was named as joint second runners-up in the competition. Embracing soft goth fashion mixed with refined femininity, Lurline takes pride in its approach combining traditional and modern techniques to create their pieces, challenging preconceived notions of what Saudi fashion looks like. It’s creative and voluminous flair captured the attention of the jury. Lurline will receive a financial grant of US $25,000 to further develop its ready-to-wear brand.
Lurline. Photographed by Michel Takla for Vogue Arabia

Joint second runner-up: Lama Jouni
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize joint second runner-up Lama Jouni

Lebanese designer Lama Jouni was also named joint second runner-up of the Vogue Fashion Prize. Since Lama Jouni’s launch in 2016, the Lebanese designer has created a series of collections inspired by music, travel, and art, and at accessible price points. Her bold yet sophisticated and contemporary designs representing the fierce yet understated woman, impressed the jury. Lama Jouni will also receive a financial grant of US $25,000 to further develop her eponymous ready-to-wear label.
Lama Jouni. Photographed by Michel Takla for Vogue Arabia

The entire class of this year’s finalists will present their collections at an exclusive Fashion Prize showroom during Paris fashion week in March 2021.
Read Next: Behind the Scenes: Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered By NEOM Finalists Photo Shoot

Behind the Scenes: Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered By NEOM Finalists Photo Shoot

Behind the Scenes: Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered By NEOM Finalists Photo Shoot

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The finale of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, powered by NEOM, is almost upon us as the finalists prepare for what may be the biggest challenge of their careers so far. Last week, ahead of the finale this Thursday on December 17, the 10 Middle Eastern finalists were tasked with showcasing three of their best creations, from their latest collections. The looks were shot for a special photo shoot for Vogue Arabia. However, you don’t have to wait for the January issue to see the designs – we have the behind-the-scenes footage right here.
From vibrant designs courtesy of Born in Exile to elegant formations by Harithand, Lurline‘s creative and voluminous flair to Lama Jouni‘s bold yet sophisticated contemporary designs, there was a positive buzz in Stellar Studios in Al Quoz, Dubai, as the first of the Vogue Fashion Prize finalists showed off their hard work.
Throughout the long day, as the finalists came and went, it was clear that the Vogue Fashion Prize represents so much more than just a challenge to the designers. From the personable welcomes to the compliments given to one another on their respective designs, the finalists’ friendly demeanor elevated what has been an exciting competition so far.
Winners of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered By NEOM will be announced at the grand event on December 17.
Read Next: Behind the Scenes with the Finalists of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered by NEOM

Meet The Finalists of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered by NEOM

Meet The Finalists of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered by NEOM

Meet The Finalists of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered by NEOM

The return of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, powered by NEOM, has, so far, been nothing short of sensational. Offering the chance for emerging designers to showcase their work on a global platform, the empowering event has returned bigger than ever before, with sustainability at the core of this year’s prize.
Since its launch in 2015, the Fashion Prize has catapulted some of the most promising regional designers to stardom. With world-class industry professionals on this year’s jury, we saw more than 250 people across 20 countries apply to be part of the illustrious program. From the hundreds of talented applicants, 10 finalists have been carefully selected, each specializing in either ready-to-wear, couture, accessories, and high jewelry categories. Without further ado, Vogue Arabia presents the finalists of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize.
Mohamed Benchellal: Benchellal
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Mohamed Benchellal of Benchellal

Category: CoutureCountry: Morocco
Moroccan designer Mohamed Benchellal launched his couture womenswear label Benchelall in Amsterdam in 2015. Benchellal’s atelier holds sustainable and ethical values at its core, taking an intricately handcrafted approach to each garment. Looking to establish a future of fashion where couture and sustainability go hand in hand, Benchellal has garnered international interest through his playful, contemporary, yet timeless designs.
Ibrahim Shebani: Born in Exile
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Ibrahim Shebani of Born in Exile

Category: Ready-to-wearCountry: Libya
German-born, Libyan designer Ibrahim Shebani was inspired to launch his luxury ready-to-wear label in 2018. Aptly named Born in Exile, the brand reflects Shebani’s experience of his family’s exile from their home country in the 1970s. His powerful designs represent a modern twist on Libya’s rich culture and folklore traditions, turning them into everyday garments.
Eric Mathieu Ritter: Emergency Room
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Eric Mathieu Ritter of Emergency Room

Category: Ready-to-wearCountry: Lebanon
Ready-to-wear label Emergency Room was born from the mind of designer Eric Mathieu Ritter. The Beirut-based brand launched in 2018, inspired by the necessity of sourcing a sustainable and ethical alternative to clothing creation. Each garment designed by Ritter utilizes dead-stock fabrics and unique vintage materials, forming Emergency Room’s conscious ready-to-wear collections.
Harith Hashim: Harithand
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Harith Hashim of Harithand

Category: Ready-to-wearCountry: Lebanon
Baghdad-born, Iraqi-Lebanese designer Harith Hashim established his luxury ready-to-wear label Harithand in 2012. Hashim’s creative flair, use of couture codes, and playful ruffles bring his vision of chemistry between a woman and her clothes to life, through his elegant collections of formal daywear and evening pieces.
Ilyes Ouali
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Ilyes Ouali

Category: Ready-to-wearCountry: Algeria
Algerian designer Ilyes Ouali’s namesake brand was conceived in 2016, inspired by his mother’s style. Taking inspiration from his mother’s impeccable wardrobe, Ouali redesigned eveningwear styles to represent the modern consumer, while retaining traditional feminine elegance.
Jude Benhalim
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Jude Benhalim

Category: JewelryCountry: Egypt
Cairo-based jewelry designer Jude Benhalim founded her eponymous label with her mother and partner, Rana Alazm, in 2011. Born and raised in Egypt, the designer’s statement pieces reflect the modern women that serves as Benhalim’s muse. Finding inspiration in geometric shapes and architectural designs, Benhalim curates intricately handcrafted pieces made with the bold female spirit in mind.
Karim Adduchi
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Karim Adduchi

Category: CoutureCountry: Morocco
Moroccan-born artist and designer Karim Adduchi launched his womenswear label in 2015 and has since seen his collections grace the runway at Paris and Amsterdam fashion weeks. Previously named on Forbes Europe and Forbes Middle East’s 30 under 30 lists as a designer to watch, Adduchi’s unique creations are recognized as examples of self-expression and globalization, often drawn from inspiration of his rich heritage.
Lama Jouni
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Lama Jouni

Category: Ready-to-wearCountry: Lebanon
Before establishing her eponymous ready-to-wear label, Lama Jouni trained at Balmain. Since Lama Jouni’s launch in 2016, the Lebanese designer has created a series of collections inspired by music, travel, and art, focusing on captivating silhouettes for the fierce yet understated woman.
Sarah and Siham Albinali: Lurline
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalists Sarah and Siham Albinali of Lurline

Category: Ready-to-wearCountry: Saudi Arabia
Sisters Sarah and Siham Albinali launched their ready-to-wear label Lurline in 2018. Born in Saudi Arabia, Sarah and Siham bring their conception of the modern woman to life in their unconventional and daring designs. Embracing soft goth fashion mixed with refined femininity, Lurline takes pride in its approach combining traditional and modern techniques to create their timeless pieces.
Yousef Akbar
2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Yousef Akbar

Category: CoutureCountry: Saudi Arabia
Born and raised in Jeddah, Yousef Akbar has been passionate about fashion from a young age. The Saudi couturier launched his namesake label at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia in 2017. The brand credits its foundations to creating ethical and responsible garments, infused with elegance and femininity, made by using recycled materials.
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