Lady Gaga

Pre-Loved Pieces are Having Major Red Carpet Moments, Courtesy of the World’s Biggest Fashion Stars

Pre-Loved Pieces are Having Major Red Carpet Moments, Courtesy of the World’s Biggest Fashion Stars

Pre-loved pieces emerge front and center on the red carpet, as stars bask in the unique spotlight of old-world glamour.
Marilyn Monroe in the bespoke Jean Louis dress Kim Kardashian would controversially borrow for the 2022 Met Gala
The 444 million-and-counting multi-platform viewers of this year’s Met Gala gave a collective gasp when Kim Kardashian arrived on the red carpet in Marilyn Monroe’s Jean Louis crystal embroidered dress.
Originally worn by the blonde bombshell herself in 1962 at Madison Square Garden when she famously serenaded President Kennedy with a very sultry rendition of Happy Birthday, Monroe had been sewn into the bespoke piece that night to achieve a seamless fit. Purchased by pop culture archivists Ripley’s Believe It or Not! for US$4.8 million in 2016 — making it the most expensive dress in the world — this very fabric of history is usually kept in a temperature and light-controlled vault in their Orlando museum and gallery. All of which contributed to making Kardashian’s modern ‘Mr President’ moment such a polarizing affair for the Internet, with many questioning why the delicate dress, made from sheer and flesh-colored marquisette fabric and set with 2,500 rhinestones, had been taken out of the archives. Dubai-based Joe Challita, couturier and fashion history enthusiast weighed in, stating, “Kim Kardashian acquiring Marilyn’s dress for the Met Gala, in my opinion, was not a move for sustainability but a move to acquire its iconic status. That dress had its moment through Marilyn. It has already been in the limelight, and it is still etched in our memories today.” Increasingly, vintage dresses are appearing more and more on the red carpet, but the motives behind the trend appear less grounded in sustainability than an opportunity to achieve an away-from-the-pack look that’s very modernity is entrenched in the past.
A vintage Dior dress Bella Hadid paid homage to at the Prince’s Trust Gala 2022
Dani Levi, Kardashian’s fashion stylist, expresses that her reasons for sourcing vintage are related to creative freedom, declaring, “A circular fashion system allows for more possibilities to express what I want to say without being bounded. I don’t want to be limited by what designers or trend forecasters think is relevant this season. I feel we stylists are artists and should be more original by letting our personal vibes, environment, and likes play a part in our aesthetic and work. Archive fashion gives us endless ideas.” Kardashian has been donning vintage since 2016, from Thierry Mugler to Vivienne Westwood, each piece delivering new iconic moments in fashion, creating conversations around the importance of historical couture.
Zendaya wears vintage Balmain at this year’s NAACP Image Awards
The idea that vintage frees women from the constraints of trends is also expressed by Bella Hadid. The Palestinian-Dutch model made an old-glamor statement on the red carpet when she wore a 1950s Dior gown to the Prince’s Trust Gala in New York, in April. It did not end there. The Cannes Festival red carpet saw her wearing not one, but two Versace gowns plucked from the maison’s archives — confirming her position as a vanguard for the vintage trend. Law Roach styled Hadid’s striking looks and is a huge supporter of vintage couture. He recently commented on actress Zendaya’s Bob Mackie moment, “Vintage and archival dressing isn’t a trend for me, it’s what led me to this career and will always be my first option when possible.”
In the region, fashion purveyor Sheikha Dana Al Khalifa is vocal in her praise for vintage couture and jewelry, revealing, “Cherie Balch of Shrimpton Couture taught me a lot about vintage dressing, and I have bought a number of pieces from her in the past.” Balch is a vintage expert to the stars and has dressed the likes of Rhianna and Adut Akech in yesteryear’s Moschino and Christian Lacroix. “I think everything in fashion is cyclical, it could never be old if it was never new. Nothing really new is being created, everyone is looking back to create their designs. Women’s current fashion climate is setting the trends on the market for fast fashion to emulate and it is costing our environment. In the Middle East, women feel they are less-than if they wear vintage; you are seen as someone who can’t afford what is new and considered ‘in.’ Through the red carpet, a shift in this opinion is starting to be seen.” Al Khalifa confirms that heritage accessories, however, are much loved. “Vintage jewelry is a big deal in the Middle East. When anyone asks me what I am wearing, I always reply that it’s my mother’s from the Eighties. I love the fact that these pieces have a story.”
Audrey Hepburn wears the Tiffany Diamond in 1961, which Lady Gaga, in Alexander McQueen, wore to collect her 2019 Oscar for Best Original Song
Looking back on the trade of garments, during the Renaissance, it was common for servants to sell their masters’ old clothing to peasants in nearby villages. Fast forward to today, when did vintage fashion become trendworthy? In an article written for Smithsonian Magazine by Professor Jennifer Le Zotte, and in her book Goodwill to Grunge, the author marks the moment second-hand buying went from “suspicious to significant.” In the Fifties, when freethinkers took to the trend of wearing thrifted garments, it became desirable. An affront to capitalism, these groups were opting out of the bourgeoisie fashion scene, with the view that if you adopted the trend, you were special, unique, and different. The style adage goes that fashion recycles every 20 years, and stars are looking back, to appear forward-thinking. A lot like the grass roots of vintage, one can see a relation to how celebrities categorize themselves today when wearing exclusive, one-of-a-kind pieces. It is something of a rebellion against commercialized fashion and acts as a further differentiator for women seeking to separate themselves from the crowded huddle of designer trends.
Originally published in the July/August 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia
Read Next: How To Shop for Vintage Fashion in Dubai Like a Pro: 5 Tips From a Connoisseur

Best Fashion Instagrams of the Week: HE Sheikha Al Mayassa Bint Hamad Al Thani, and Queen Rania

Best Fashion Instagrams of the Week: HE Sheikha Al Mayassa Bint Hamad Al Thani, and Queen Rania

Photo: Instagram.com/queenrania
When it comes to modest fashion, no one does it quite like the royals of the region. This week, HE Sheikha Al Mayassa Bint Hamad Al Thani had a major sartorial moment while attending Off-White’s special “Imaginary Experience” in Qatar. The royal made an appearance alongside supermodel Naomi Campbell to celebrate the late Virgil Abloh’s creations dressed in an ankle-grazing coat that served as a street style-inspired abaya, complete with neon detailing and a bejeweled slogan. Not too long after, in Jordan, Queen Rania was seen enjoying iftar with her husband, King Abdullah II, in a feminine lilac dress with ivory and coral detailing.

As Ramadan continues on, this week also saw some of the Arab world’s favorite celebrities make a case for on-trend iftar and suhoor dressing. While Tunisian actor Dorra Zarrouk opted for a creamy white kaftan with Hamsa embellishment, Hend Sabry went the more casual route, topping a simple white top and jeans with a vibrant blue jacket patterned with orange blooms.

Overseas, Arab designers won favor once more during the 2022 edition of the Grammys, with everyone from Chrissy Teigen to Paris Hilton donning the region’s most coveted labels. Among the best was Lady Gaga’s pick—a minty blue Elie Saab look which came with an oversized bow for some added drama. If you missed the coolest fashion Instagrams of this week, scroll to catch up.

Lady Gaga Wore a Custom Elie Saab Dress for Her Emotional Grammys Performance

Lady Gaga Wore a Custom Elie Saab Dress for Her Emotional Grammys Performance

Photo: Instagram.com
While the Oscars saw plenty of stars in Arab designers on the red carpet, Lady Gaga took regional talent to the stage at the Grammy Awards last night. After walking into the event in an asymmetrical black and white Armani Privé gown, the star slipped into a custom Elie Saab dress for her performance.
The singer was introduced via video by Tony Bennett, the iconic musician to whom Gaga paid a touching tribute. Taking the stage to sing ‘Love for Sale’ and ‘Do I Love You’ from her album Love for Sale, which she recorded with Bennett, Gaga was dressed in a mint blue satin dress paired with matching metallic pumps appropriate for the jazz performance. The bespoke strapless piece designed by the Lebanese couturier captured the Old Hollywood vibe Gaga is known to have embraced as of late and featured a bodice wrapped in layers of fabric, a flared-out skirt, and an oversized bow at the back. Sporting the same hairstyle from her red carpet appearance, Gaga’s blonde locks were pulled back in a classic updo with waves, while her makeup look was completed with glowing skin and glossy pink lips.
Photo: Instagram.com
This marks the second time when the 36-year-old has championed Arab talent during this year’s awards season. Accepting the New York Film Critics Circle Awards for best actress for her work in House of Gucci last month, Gaga wore a pair of Yigit pumps from Jordanian-Romanian footwear designer Amina Muaddi’s namesake label.
Gaga’s tear-jerking performance at the Grammys was accompanied by five nominations which she shared with Bennett. The singer also has a busy year ahead, with a continuation of her Jazz and Piano residency in Vegas, followed by her long-awaited Chromatica ball tour starting on July 17 in Düsseldorf, Germany.
Read Next: Lady Gaga Just Put a New Twist on the Little Black Dress With the Most Dramatic Sleeves

Selena Gomez, Lady Gaga, and More: The Best Dressed Stars at SAG Awards 2022

Selena Gomez, Lady Gaga, and More: The Best Dressed Stars at SAG Awards 2022

Photo: Getty
A night when actors celebrate the talent of their peers, the Screen Actors Guild Awards calls for expressive fashion. Tonight at Santa Monica’s Barker Hanger, the attendees went all out. After 2021’s virtual ceremony, the atmosphere was jubilant and the style steeped in references to cinema’s golden age.
Respecting history doesn’t mean replicating it, and the stars who won the evening managed to channel the past in inventive ways. Selena Gomez’s Oscar de la Renta column gown had puffed sleeves and shoulders big enough for Joan Crawford, but its sleek silhouette rendered in matte black velvet was utterly modern. That blingy Bulgari serpenti choker flecked with 37 cts of diamonds pavé certainly didn’t hurt either.
Likewise, Lady Gaga’s refined Armani Privé was the right mix of past and present. While it would have looked right at home on Veronica Lake, the white column gown with its crystalized bustier and curve accentuating design had just enough outré flair to please Mother Monster.
Even the industry’s newest names nodded to old-school stars. Squid Game’s HoYeon Jung can carry off Nicolas Ghesquière’s boldest pieces, but the silver beaded spaghetti strap dress he created for her first trip to the SAGs was a classic ingenue. Personalized by adding a custom LV version of a Korean daenggi ribbon, it allowed Jung to make a dazzling debut.
Vintage vibes were de rigueur on the red carpet, but nothing can stop Cynthia Erivo from doing her own thing. Arriving in a custom red vinyl Vuitton gown with a crimson faux fur slung over her shoulders, the Genius: Aretha star looked like she’d beamed in from the next millennium. Few would dare attempt a look with such glossy gravitas but Erivo’s style gave the crowd a thrilling glimpse of fashion’s future.
Will Smith and Jada Pinkett-Smith in Gareth Pugh
Photo: Getty.
Lady Gaga in Armani Privé and Tiffany & Co. jewelry
Photo: Getty
Venus Williams in Dolce & Gabbana and Gismondi 1754 jewelry
Photo: Getty
Sandra Oh in Carolina Herrera
Photo: Getty
Selena Gomez in Oscar de la Renta and Bulgari jewelry
Photo: Getty
Rosario Dawson in Oscar de la Renta and Chopard jewelry
Photo: Getty
Caitriona Balfe in Saint Laurent and Van Cleef & Arpel jewelry
Photo: Getty
Kirsten Dunst in Erdem and Jesse Plemons 
Photo: Getty
Cynthia Erivo in Louis Vuitton
Photo: Getty

Ariana DeBose in Valentino Couture
Photo: Getty
Julianna Margulies in Narciso Rodriguez from Shrimpton Couture
Photo: Getty
Hoyeon Jung in Louis Vuitton
Photo: Getty
Naomi Watts in Fendi Couture
Photo: Getty
Vanessa Hudgens in Atelier Versace
Photo: Getty
Fran Drescher in Reem Acra
Photo: Getty
Emilia Jones in Givenchy Haute Couture
Photo: Getty
Helen Mirren in Dolce & Gabbana
Photo: Getty
Benedict Cumberbatch in Berluti and Sophie Hunter in Christian Dior
Photo: Getty
Hailee Steinfeld in Miu Miu
Photo: Getty.
Cate Blanchett in Armani Privé
Photo: Getty
Elle Fanning in Gucci
Photo: Getty
Kelsey Asbille in Commission
Photo: Getty
Maggie Gyllenhaal in The Row
Photo: Getty
Nicole Kidman in Saint Laurent
Photo: Getty
Kerry Washington in Celia Kritharioti
Photo: Getty
Read Next: “We Should Dress Up More”: Giorgio Armani’s Message at Emporio Armani’s Milan Fashion Week Show
Originally published in Vogue.com

Lady Gaga Just Put a New Twist on the Little Black Dress With the Most Dramatic Sleeves

Lady Gaga Just Put a New Twist on the Little Black Dress With the Most Dramatic Sleeves

Lady Gaga in Christian Siriano. Photo: Getty
Lady Gaga’s fashion choices are anything but ordinary, so when the pop diva decides to wear a wardrobe staple, it’s not going to be standard. Currently promoting House of Gucci’s awards season run on the late-night circuit, Gaga paid a visit to Jimmy Kimmel Live last night. When promoting her film projects, she and stylists Sandra Amador and Tom Eerebout tend to go for glamour, so they pulled out a little black dress from Christian Siriano’s pre-fall collection, Giuseppe Zanotti heels, cat-eye sunglasses by Dita, and a wealth of diamond and gold jewelry from Los Angeles label KatKim. For Gaga, the combination was subdued, but it still projected the right amount of retro attitude.

What separated Siriano’s LBD from the competition were its voluminous tulle sleeves. Sheer, ruffled, and almost the exact length of the look’s hemline, they added movement and a sense of playfulness to the silhouette. Fluttering as Gaga walked across Kimmel’s stage and later when she paused to pose for photographers, the sleeves helped her to create a series of expressive paparazzi snapshots.
Lady Gaga topped her LBD off with glossy black heels and matching sunnies. Photo: Getty
Siriano’s adaptable design allows wearers to remove the garment’s most dramatic element and wear the mini-dress by itself. Still, Gaga’s enjoyment of her outfit made a case for embracing fashion’s theatrical side no matter the occasion. As for her beauty look for the evening, it was all about letting the outfit do all the talking. Gaga kept things simple with glowing skin, a swipe of lip gloss, and breezy blonde locks left open.
Originally published in Vogue.com

13 of Lady Gaga’s Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments Through The Years

13 of Lady Gaga’s Most Dazzling Jewelry Moments Through The Years

Photo: Getty
Lady Gaga has been wowing the world with her bold performances and head-to-toe fantastical looks from the moment she burst on to the music scene in 2008, and jewelry has always firmly been a part of her self-mythologizing role-play – whether she is spinning a tale of outrageous avant-garde or full-blown Hollywood glamour. From her early homemade looks and dramatic costume jewelry to her adoption of a more refined aesthetic, Vogue takes a look back at her most incredible jewelry moments and proves yet again why the performer is a living legend.
2008. In this early TV appearance, a hint of Lady Gaga’s future avant-garde style is on view with her giant kawaii hair-bow and crystal shoulder piece. An oversized crystal ring provides the finishing touch. Photo: Getty
August 2009. Arriving at Tokyo airport in 2009, Lady Gaga channeled a Desperately Seeking Susan-era Madonna with armfuls of punky studded leather bracelets. Photo: Getty
2010. Lady Gaga made sartorial history at the MTV Video Music Awards by appearing in this now iconic dress, designed by Franc Fernandez – but how do you accessorise a gown made from fresh meat? With a neck and arms full of crystals, of course. Photo: Getty
September 2012. For the launch of Fame, her first perfume in 2012, Lady G fully committed as always to the task in hand. From her adorned beehive to her earrings, her jewellery channeled the black and gold design of the fragrance bottle. Photo: Getty
October 2012. For the London launch of the fragrance, she preempted the body jewellery craze that was to come with bejewelled fingers and matching talons dripping in gold. Photo: Getty
February 2015. A more glamorous Gaga emerges as the years go by. For the Grammys in 2015, she went for the green goddess contrast of silver couture and giant emeralds, the latter provided by Lorraine Schwartz. Photo: Getty
February 2015. Taylor Kinney proposed to Gaga on Valentine’s Day 2015 with a six- to eight-carat heart-shaped diamond by Lorraine Schwartz. She shared their happy news on Instagram. The couple split up in the summer of 2016. Photo: Instagram.com
2016. Only white diamonds would do for her (almost) demure look with a Marilyn Monroe-inspired blonde coiffure and make-up at the Golden Globes, where Gaga took home the prize for Best Performance in a Miniseries or Television Film for American Horror Story: Hotel. Photo: Getty
September 2018. The monochrome look was reversed for the Toronto Film Festival screening of A Star is Born that October. Giant white diamond earrings by Chopard stand out majestically against an all-black Armani Privé look. Called the Gardens of Kalahari earrings, they centre on a 25-carat pear-shaped diamond on one side and a 26-carat heart-shaped diamond on the other. The earrings were also worn by Charlize Theron at the 2017 Oscars. Photo: Getty
September 2018. Her engagement ring from ex-fiancé Christian Carino was in the same traditional cluster setting style as Lady Diana Spencer’s engagement ring, but in true Lady Gaga fashion, it was supersized and in a cartoonish pink. Opinion was divided over whether it was a pink sapphire or diamond. Photo: Getty
January 2019. At the Screen Actors Guild Awards, Gaga channeled sophisticated glamour with a diamond, platinum and gold choker with heart and star motifs and butterfly wing gold and diamond earrings from the 2019 Tiffany Blue Book collection alongside several Tiffany T bracelets. Photo: Getty
February 2019. For the Oscars, Lady Gaga wore the 128.54-carat Tiffany Diamond, one of the largest yellow diamonds in the world. Rarely seen out in public since Charles Lewis Tiffany acquired it in 1878, it had last been worn by Audrey Hepburn in a Breakfast at Tiffany’s promotional shoot. It has since had another outing in this year’s About Love campaign starring Beyoncé and Jay-Z. Photo: Getty
January 2021. For her performance of the American national anthem at President Joe Biden’s inauguration, Lady Gaga wore a brooch specially designed for the occasion by Schiaparelli’s Daniel Roseberry. The giant gilded dove of peace spoke volumes about the performer’s feelings on the occasion, and demonstrated the power of a jewel to convey a message. “Jewellery is there to heighten the fantasy of haute couture,” Roseberry told me at the time. “It reminds me a lot of decorating a room. It’s the chandelier that brings the room alive.” Photo: Getty
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Lady Gaga Wears Lebanese Designer Lama Jouni in Her Latest Instagram Video

Lady Gaga Wears Lebanese Designer Lama Jouni in Her Latest Instagram Video

Photo: Instagram.com/ladygaga
Lady Gaga is no stranger to Middle Eastern designers. Just months ago, the music icon was spotted out and about in New York post her performance with Tony Bennett at Radio City Music Hall in a sparkling gunmetal Georges Hobeika gown, her first ensemble by the celebrated Lebanese designer. And over the years, her loyalty to the creations of Tunisian couturier Azzedine Alaïa hasn’t been missed either. Most recently, Gaga gave her nod to artists of the region once again via a video she shared on her official Instagram page.

On November 21, Lady Gaga took to social media to announce a new launch—the Italian Glam Highlighter Brush from her beauty line, Haus Laboratories by Lady Gaga. In the first look, a smouldering Gaga is seen showing off the results of her latest drop dressed in a risqué off-shoulder black dress by none other than Dubai-based, Lebanese-born designer Lama Jouni. Gaga paired her fail-safe ebony number with sparkling solitaire earrings, a statement cocktail ring, and a sleek beauty look. Her picks: coral lips, softly smoked out lids, and an elegant low bun. The video announcing the new highlighter brush has already earned thousands of likes and comments, with Jouni fans instantly recognizing the designer’s feminine and understated ensemble.
After attending Istituto Marangoni, Lama Jouni also studied fashion at Parsons, Paris, and went on to work with Balmain and Reed Krakoff. The designer launched her own ready-to-wear label in November 2013, and today is counted among the favorites in the region. Check out the very same dress worn by Lady Gaga below. 
Photo: Lama Jouni
Read Next: Exclusive Lady Gaga Interview: “I Was Told I Wasn’t Good Enough, But It Didn’t Stop Me”

Big Shoulders and Lots of Vintage: How Lady Gaga Got Dressed for House of Gucci

Big Shoulders and Lots of Vintage: How Lady Gaga Got Dressed for House of Gucci

Earlier this summer, the public got its first look at Lady Gaga as the infamous Patrizia Reggiani in the haute tragedy House of Gucci (out later this month) when the studio tweeted a still that featured the star with her lips glazed in frosty burgundy and her hair dyed as dark as shoe polish and fluffed like soufflé. Gaga wore a mink coat and, beneath it, a leather-trimmed tunic in Gucci’s iconic canvas monogram. In short, she appeared every bit the Mrs. Gucci that Reggiani herself had plotted and schemed to be—before she hired a hit man in 1995 to shoot her husband, Maurizio Gucci (played by Adam Driver), scion of the Gucci fortune. (Asked once by a reporter why she didn’t do the job herself, Reggiani responded: “My eyesight is not so good—I didn’t want to miss.”)
The can’t-make-this-stuff-up film, directed by Ridley Scott, is predominately set in the early 1990s, long before Alessandro Michele preached geek chic to his disciples and just prior to Tom Ford repositioning waists to our tailbones. At the time, Gucci had lost its luster due to overexposure.
Costume designer Janty Yates “bought a huge amount of Gucci on eBay and online at Vestiaire Collective to model on a mannequin and show to Ridley,” she says—but then Gaga came on board and upped the ante. (Yates recalls fittings lasting up to five hours.)
In character, Gaga speaks with an Italian accent purposefully devoid of romance, costumed in boxy, gold-buttoned power dresses and silk pussy-bow blouses. Her wardrobe is a melange of vintage and period-appropriate finds: two pieces came from Gucci’s archive (unlike some members of the Gucci family, the house has supported the production), and a silver chain mail look was loaned by Ms. Gaga herself. Janty also called up fine jewelry maisons like Bulgari and Boucheron and asked to be lent pieces. She knew costume jewelry wouldn’t cut it. (As Reggiani once quipped, “it’s better to cry in a Rolls-Royce than to be happy on a bicycle.”)

Since the release of that first Gaga image, interest in this era of Gucci has been mounting: Gucci even reissued that same tunic, a 1969 design pulled from the archives. “It’s hard to find Gucci that’s pre–Tom Ford,” says Cherie Balch, the dealer behind the online vintage destination Shrimpton Couture.
Getting the authentic House of Gucci look, then, is going to take some strategy. That said, 1stdibs, Vestiaire, and Etsy have troves of red-and-green-striped hobo bags and bamboo-handled satchels from the 1960s to ’90s. (Vintage tip: Inside the handbags, the Gucci logo should mostly appear in script, not the serif typeface of Ford’s reign.)
Back at Gucci HQ in Milan, the label is constantly looking to its archive for inspiration—consider the recent reissue of the Diana bag and Harry Styles’s celebrated appropriation of the Jackie bag. At Gucci’s centennial Aria collection this spring, the runway featured the flora print designed for Grace Kelly in 1966 and Ford’s almost lascivious red velvet suit. Will Gaga’s getups continue to fuel the vintage craze? It’s looking pretty Gucci.
Originally published on Vogue.com

From Angel Wings to Nine-Inch Heels — Lady Gaga’s Best Looks Ahead of House of Gucci

From Angel Wings to Nine-Inch Heels — Lady Gaga’s Best Looks Ahead of House of Gucci

Never one to shy away from eccentricity and maximalism, Lady Gaga knows how to wow the paparazzi, fans, and fashion critics alike with head-turning ensembles. Who can forget her camp-themed, fuchsia pink caped gown at the 2019 Met Gala, or the time the star walked the Grammy award carpet in a gigantic egg?
However, her personal style is just as glamorous, with her outfits borrowing from albums or films that she takes on. When she released her country-leaning album Joanne, she frequently graced our phone and televisions screens sporting denim cut-offs and a pink cowboy hat, and when she was promoting her 2018 film A Star Is Born, she leaned into classic Hollywood style. The star’s latest fashion mood is a bold return to classic glamour.
Whether it’s brunette hair sleekly combed into a demure up-do paired with a timeless Alessandra Rich dress and Lanvin clutch, or sophisticated Dita graphic cat-eye sunnies and matte pink lips accompanying a Giambattista Valli beaded tulle gown, each look is a breath of fresh air. Ahead of her upcoming film House of Gucci where she portrays Italian icon and ex-wife of Maurizio Gucci, Patrizia Reggiani, we round up Lady Gaga’s best looks this past few months and close to the trailer launch.
Read Next: What the House of Gucci Trailer Means for Fashion

What the House of Gucci Trailer Means for Fashion

What the House of Gucci Trailer Means for Fashion

Lady Gaga. Photo: Getty Images
The release of House of Gucci’s official posters made quite a bit of noise yesterday, but now that the film’s first full-length trailer is online we’re really buzzing. Expectations for the movie were already running high, what with the steady flow of Lady Gaga and Adam Driver paparazzi images and the artfully staged meme-able moments—ahem, that pastry.
The trailer delivers the drama and plenty more, offering delights for the movie’s diverse demographics of Gaga fans, fashion fans, and fans of Adam Driver in various stages of undress. Gaga’s portrayal of Patrizia Reggiani looks like both a camp masterpiece and an earnest, almost humble interpretation of a woman on—and then well past—the verge. Driver has dialed back his sex appeal to portray Maurizio Gucci as a timid scion of the Gucci family, while Jared Leto amped up his inner ham to play Paolo Gucci, a guy who calls his purple corduroy suit “Shee-ka!” (That’s chic in Leto’s Italian-speaking-English accent.)
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Many have wondered how the real Gucci family and the Gucci brand would react to director Ridley Scott’s sensationalized take on a family tragedy. Patrizia Gucci, a second cousin of the murdered Maurizio, told the Associated Press in April, “We are truly disappointed.… They are stealing the identity of a family to make a profit, to increase the income of the Hollywood system…. Our family has an identity, privacy. We can talk about everything, but there is a borderline that cannot be crossed.”
The Gucci label, now owned by Kering, has said almost nothing about the film’s imminent arrival. But friends of Gucci like Leto and Salma Hayek, the wife of Kering’s François-Henri Pinault, appear in the film, creating small bonds between the brand and the production.
It seems all but certain that the onscreen intrigue will result in increased interest in Gucci. Other content makers have been betting on the synergies between Hollywood and fashion since the beginning of the year: After Halston, Netflix partnered with the brand on a capsule, while Gossip Girl incorporates real fashion brands like Christopher John Rogers and Loewe as plot points. Pie-crust collars and sheep-patterned knits gained popularity after The Crown too. Will Gucci, the brand, find ways to capitalize on the Gucci family drama? Maybe it won’t have to be so direct: Gucci is celebrating its 200th anniversary this year with launches, activations, and celebrations around the globe. Its November 3 runway show in Los Angeles, timed with the annual LACMA gala, will anticipate the movie’s release by just two weeks. Chances are we’ll see Lady Gaga in the front row.
Read Next: Everything to Know About Dolce & Gabbana’s Upcoming Shows in Venice
Originally published on Vogue.com

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