Kim Jones

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Fresh Take On Haute Couture For AW 2022

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Fresh Take On Haute Couture For AW 2022

“I wanted lightness in the clothes this season,” Fendi’s artistic director Kim Jones says of his fresh approach to the brand’s autumn/winter 2022 haute couture collection. Below, Anders Christian Madsen shares his key takeaways from the show.

Kim Jones debuted a lighter take on haute couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

There was a lightness to the savoir-faire Kim Jones presented for Fendi on Thursday afternoon in Palais Brongniart, which uplifted his take on haute couture with a new freshness. As the show progressed, he quite literally peeled off the layers until the lightness reached a point of near-nudity, with buoyant embroidered overlays floating ethereally over the models’ skin. “It’s pretty light,” he concurred during a preview. “I wanted lightness in the clothes this season, also in terms of how the embroideries were done.” If Jones’s first forays into couture at Fendi were about showcasing his discoveries of the magic made possible by the artisans of this haute institution through multi-layered craftsmanship, this season represented a clean slate, and one that felt like a way of using haute couture as a proposal for ideas that could trickle into real life.

It featured Kata Yuzen motifs from Japan
Photo: Gorunway.com

It all began with a trip to Japan in March, before the borders opened. “I managed to get in. I was so determined,” Jones said, hinting at some next-level string-pulling. “I used to go six times a year. I love it so much. We went to see a number of the suppliers we’ve always worked with on special projects, and I bought all these fragments of 17th-century kimonos. Just pieces of hand-painted silk fabric.” His finds prompted him to contact a family of traditional Kata Yuzen fabric-makers in Kyoto, whom he knew from previous collaborations. “They hadn’t really been working very much because there were no ceremonies in two years. I asked if they would like to do something with us.” The results were a series of beautiful fragment patterns in pastel colors, which Jones worked into column dresses that cut a monastic silhouette for the collection that felt decidedly Fendi.
It was a real-life approach to couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

“With me, when I’m looking at stuff, I’m always thinking past, present, future. The past is the research, the present is now, and the future is the idea of where it’s going to go,” Jones said, referring to the optical white box that framed the show and added the sense of futurism to proceedings, which was also present in his previous haute couture show. It had a simplifying effect on a collection that felt like a real consideration for how haute couture might be used in everyday life – by the lucky few – and, more importantly, how it might serve to push and inspire ideas for ready-to-wear. Take for instance the scalloped embroideries that adorned a two-piece set, which was, essentially, a T-shirt and a slouchy trouser. Along with the Kata Yuzen, these motifs and techniques felt ripe for ready-to-wear adaptation.
Jones gave us daywear couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

Jones also made pragmatic proposals for daywear couture. The two exquisitely-cut tailored looks that opened the show were created from the finest vicuna, a tactility Jones went on to interpret in the knitted dresses that followed. “Loro Piana always send me a piece of vicuna for Christmas. I always make myself a nice tailored coat out of it,” he quipped, but those desires are entirely universal. Of the knitwear, Jones said it was all about creating a super-luxe lightness for real-life (the extravagant kind, in any case). “I wanted to have some light knitwear pieces for, you know, that jet-set lifestyle of the client. They can wear that on the plane and get off and still [feel] fabulous.” Seeing Jones tackle the idea of real-life daywear in his haute couture was great and created a real affinity with his ready-to-wear collections.
Jones has the same birth chart as Karl Lagerfeld
Photo: Gorunway.com

Asked by Suzy Menkes if he’s the new Karl Lagerfeld – what with his multi-faceted work schedule and all – Jones laughed. “I don’t think I’m the new Karl, but I have exactly the same birth chart. I like to work hard.” In the case of this collection, his hard work was in the detail: a subtle, muted and pared-back illustration of the painstaking art form that is haute couture. “Fendi is about a working woman. A woman that’s powerful,” he said, reflecting on the role of the collection in the real world. “I love the colors. I’m really happy with it.”

Originally published in Vogue.co.uk 
Read next: How Louis Vuitton, Dior And Fendi Are Selling On Their Leftover Fabrics

“Connecting the past with the present,” Kim Jones Presents His Second Couture Collection for Fendi

“Connecting the past with the present,” Kim Jones Presents His Second Couture Collection for Fendi

Courtesy of Fendi
Set to a hauntingly evocative choir-infused orchestral score, Kim Jones presented his second haute couture offering for Fendi via a 12-ish-minute film inspired by Pier Paolo Pasolini and directed by Luca Guadagnino. The set, a dreamy labyrinth-like other world of Roman modernist architecture proved the perfect backdrop to Jones’s triumph of artisanal craftsmanship. While his debut traced his transition from England to Rome, the FW21 offering sees him settle in the Eternal City.
Courtesy of Fendi
“Pasolini observed Rome become modern – and that is what is happening to me: connecting eras, the old with the new, the past with the present,” reads Kim Jones’s show notes. “Rome is a fascinating city because it has so many pasts – and I was drawn to Pasolini because I have always been inspired by his vision of the world.”
Courtesy of Fendi
Captured through Pasolini’s perspective on reality, an opening look of a tonal white leather coat with python application emerges through a curved opening, shortly followed by a men’s suit with Greek garland motif intarsia. The same motif features on a strapless dress, accessorized with a cuff in brass Crema Marfill marble inspired by the drapery and togas of Ancient Roman statues. Delfina Delettrez’s jewelry throughout was a fitting addition to a collection that merged the past and present: beautiful Amphora-inspired earrings were cut with the Fendi logo and worn asymmetrically.
Courtesy of Fendi
Tulle ruffles, draping, gold macramé, intricate embroidery, ostrich feather applied silks, organza embellished with mother-of-pearl flowers, crystal beading – Jones’ certainly delivered couture techniques and materials, and did it with flair. Standout looks included a floor-length multicolored gown constructed of tiny silk organza handmade fringed stripes; a cut-out intarsia design coat made of leather, suede, and shaved mink all layered and singularly attached for a total construction time of 2,400 hours; and a strapless dress with drape back in Dégradé embroidery from pink to black, paired with black opera gloves – simply iconic.
Courtesy of Fendi
The cast was equally prominent, including Kate Moss in an organza mink petal coat with 27,000 elements layered to create a flower explosion, and Amber Valetta, in a printed cape dress in silk Mikado and crinoline. After all, this was clearly a celebratory collection – of icons, Rome, heritage, modern design, and thoroughly complex craftsmanship.
Read Next: The Best Modest Looks Seen at Couture Week Fall/Winter 21-22

5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s First Ready-to-Wear Collection for Fendi FW21

5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s First Ready-to-Wear Collection for Fendi FW21

Courtesy of Fendi

For his ready-to-wear debut at Fendi, Kim Jones paid homage to the women who have shaped the house past and present, proposing a modern wardrobe rooted in Roman glamour. Here, Vogue brings you five things to know about the collection.
It was Kim Jones’s first ready-to-wear collection for Fendi
Courtesy of Fendi

For his first turn on Fendi’s ready-to-wear runway, the F-shaped glass boxes that framed Kim Jones’s haute couture debut for the house last month had been filled with Roman ruins. “The couture show was about moving my mindset from England to Rome,” he said on a video call from Milan before the digital show. Now, he had arrived, ready to navigate that Roman landscape where the constant evidence of time has a way of pushing you into the present. “I wanted a wardrobe for women for modern times, with the DNA of what Fendi is to me.” That, he said, was the total sum of the many women that make up – and have historically made up – the Fendi family and its ateliers. They played muses to his collection, imbuing it with their effortless embodiment of modernist Roman glamour, and the no-nonsense charm that comes with living in a city that’s seen it all.
Jones debuted his Fendi silhouette
Courtesy of Fendi

Jones presented his proposal for a new Fendi in powdery and earthy tonal looks, which he called “palate cleansing”, and which helped to clarify his silhouette through a screen. Lines either followed the contour of the body, or obscured it. In dresses – often knitted – the former case was made in a straightforward and easy silhouette, which Jones occasionally tempered with a soft magnified shoulder or a dropped armhole. His flou had a handkerchief sensibility to it, sometimes underlined by actual handkerchief hems, but most vigorously expressed in shirts and blouses oversized to the point of shrouding. Jones picked up those clues from his couture debut where some silhouettes entirely masked the anatomy, while others adapted a body-conscious Vionnet shape. That dress was repeated in this collection, in shorter versions with silk-satin wrap detailing that echoed that of Jones’s men’s suiting at Dior.
Silvia Venturini Fendi was a muse
Courtesy of Fendi

It was inevitable that Jones’s work for Fendi would bear evidence of a life lived in menswear. In a transition that made it come full circle, he turned his spotlight to the wardrobe of Silvia Venturini Fendi, who remains creative director of accessories at her LVMH-owned family company. It was meta because Venturini doesn’t just design Fendi’s men’s collections but is known for her particularly handsome personal wardrobe, which incorporates elements of menswear, and has now ended up inspiring Jones’s womenswear for the house that carries her surname. Her signature look was evident in formidably-structured tailoring and jackets with an air of workwear about them, such as the caban in look 8, which Jones referred to as “the Silvia jacket”. “When I met her, she was wearing a very chic safari sort of dress. It was immaculate. It has that almost regal feel to the quality,” he reminisced, noting how Venturini has been his biggest source for Fendi facts. “She knows everything by heart.”
Jones’s Fendi cut a contrast to that of Karl Lagerfeld
Courtesy of Fendi

Where the Fendi of Jones’s predecessor Karl Lagerfeld was always quite ‘dressed’ – although religiously light in materiality – Jones’s Fendi emerged as a more low-key, perhaps practical wardrobe. “Daywear, tailoring, dresses… things that have a certain ease to them, but which you can dress up if you want to,” as he put it. “It’s what I look at with the family: the way they can look so chic at work, and half an hour later they come to dinner a touch different, having changed the look.” Along with Venturini Fendi, Jones had mined Lagerfeld’s Fendi archives for references to adapt. “I think she likes the idea of someone interpreting it, because she worked with Karl her entire life,” he said. “It’s good to look at things from the outside. You see things you wouldn’t see when you’re immersed in it.”
The show introduced new accessories
Courtesy of Fendi

With his natural eye for marketing, Lagerfeld famously drew the Fendi double-F logo, declaring it stood for “Fun Furs”. “He trademarked it straight away, and got them to buy him one of the most expensive houses in Rome as payment for it,” Jones smiled. “Or so goes the story.” He riffed on the house’s monogram in architectural heels that evoked the sharp geometry of Fs, and introduced a large soft bag with massive double Fs forged in hardware – a detail echoed in jewellery designed by Delfina Delettrez, Venturini Fendi’s daughter. “When Karl played with the Fendi codes, it was always in very clever ways. Not that I’d ever compare myself to him,” Jones said, “but I’m trying to think of things that can echo that going into the future.”
Read Next: 5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s Breathtaking Debut Fendi Couture Show
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s Breathtaking Debut Fendi Couture Show

5 Things to Know About Kim Jones’s Breathtaking Debut Fendi Couture Show

Courtesy of Fendi

Kim Jones’s Fendi couture debut is an homage to “strong women, intelligent women, who know what they’re doing in their lives. Pioneering women, like the Bloomsbury women, like the women in the show,” the designer told British Vogue’s Olivia Singer during an exclusive preview. The multi-layered spectacle, inspired by feminist literary icons and four generations of Fendi women alike, is a celebration of everything Jones stands for as a designer.
Here, five things to know about his fusion of British romance and Italian grandeur.
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

Kim Jones drew inspiration from the pioneering Bloomsbury Group
With a rich tapestry of disparate cultural experiences to draw from, during a youth spent between England and Africa, Jones landed on Firle, a quaint village in East Sussex. Specifically, Charleston, the modernist home of the Bloomsbury Group. “I like how this family of people – and particularly these two pioneering sisters, Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf – moved things forward,” explains Jones. “I admire the way that they lived their lives, the freedom that they created for themselves and the art that they left behind for the world.” His deeply personal Fendi couture debut marries the romantic British sensibility of the Bloomsbury set with the heritage of the Italian house in a collection that’s rich with references. The most breathtaking? The embroidered embellishments on gowns, inspired by Charleston’s painted murals and realised in thousands of bouquets of organza petals and Murano glass beaded flowers.
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

An exhibition of Bloomsbury Group books and ephemera complements the show
The show’s accompanying literary exhibition, curated by Sammy Jay of Peter Harrington Rare Books, sheds more light on the parallels between the Bloomsbury Group and Fendi’s Rome HQ (Bell, for example, channelled her love for Italian Classicism into frescoes of the Borghese gardens on the walls of Charleston). From a rare first edition of resident Charlestonian TS Eliot’s The Waste Land, to the first ever copy of Woolf’s Orlando read by Vita Sackville-West, the paramour who inspired the novel, the curiosity cabinets will delight anyone who has ever pored over Woolf’s time-travelling explorations of gender and identity – once it is open to the public, that is. “I wanted to look at different points of time in Fendi – which is why Orlando came into my head,” Jones told British Vogue of the formative influence of the seminal literary love letter. “I wanted to pull out points of reference from Karl [Lagerfeld, former Fendi womenswear creative director], but renew them. To look at them in a lighter way, to see them with a new eye, but without it appearing nostalgic.”
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

The casting was major
Jones’s female fan base, from Bella Hadid and Cara Delevingne to Naomi Campbell, naturally came together for their friend’s career-defining fashion show. Leading the charge were Kate Moss and her daughter Lila Grace; and Adwoa Aboah, another muse behind Jones’s Fendi vision, and her sister Kesewa. “What I love most about Kim is his ability to bring family wherever he goes,” says Aboah. “He keeps such a wide range of people around him – artists, musicians, the youth, everyone – which is why his work continues to remain so relevant.” Rounding out the cast? Demi Moore, Christy Turlington and her nephew, James.
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

The Fendi family walked through a Fendi maze
The Mosses, Turlingtons and Aboahs walked between a grid of interlocking Fs before standing in individual glass units – some of which bloomed with flowers in homage to Sissinghurst Garden Castle, which once belonged to Sackville-West. Others housed giant Stone Pines – the parasol-shaped trees commonly found in Rome – while a number were grounded by glossy marble floors inspired by the Borghese gallery. Adding to the atmospheric quality of the live stream was the supremely moving Max Richter soundtrack. The British-German composer enlisted Silvia Venturini Fendi – who expressed how happy she is to be working with Jones – Isabella Rossellini, Christina Ricci, Moss and Aboah to read passages of love letters from Vita and Virginia, before soundtracking them to new music inspired by Woolf’s body of work. This complete ode to the pioneering Bloomsbury women and the individuals walking in the show could not have been more detailed.
Photo: Stephane de Sakutin

Kate Moss consulted on the accessories
“Kate has such immaculate taste – she’s seen everything, and her knowledge of fashion is so vast,” Jones said of the “logical” decision to appoint Moss as a Fendi accessories consultant. From the blush silk boots hand-embroidered with beads, micro-pearls and glass micro-sequins, to the Murano glass and crystal ear cuffs – the fruits of jewellery creative director Delfina Delettrez Fendi’s work – painstakingly crafted accessories added an exquisite artistic element to the collection, while remaining wearable. As Kate herself says, “What Kim does is always very cool and modern. He knows exactly what people want to wear.”
Read Next: All the Highlights from Day Two of Paris Haute Couture Week Spring/Summer 2021
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Kim Jones Will Present His First Fendi Couture Collection January 27

Kim Jones Will Present His First Fendi Couture Collection January 27

Kim Jones. Photo: Brett Lloyd/Courtesy of Fendi

It’s set to be one of the most highly anticipated events in the 2021 fashion calendar as Kim Jones takes over the reigns from the late Karl Lagerfeld as artistic director of couture and womenswear at Fendi, presenting his first couture collection on January 27.
Stepping into Lagerfeld’s shoes was never going to be an easy feat, and for Jones the collection marks a series of firsts. The show will not only be his first for the LVMH-owned, Italian fashion house, since his appointment in September, but it will also mark the first time in the British designer’s career where he will design both women’s and couture clothes.
Jones, who is also a designer of Dior Men, will showcase the collection at the Palais Brongniart during Paris Haute Couture Week. Both Fendi and Jones announced plans for the big show on Instagram, confirming, “This will be Kim Jones debut collection for the Roman Maison.”

Karl Lagerfeld enjoyed a tenure of 54 years at Fendi, working closely with Silvia Venturini Fendi, who continues to design Fendi accessories and men’s wear. LVMH are hopeful the new partnership will be as creative and successful.
 “I would like to profoundly thank Monsieur Arnault, Pietro Beccari, Serge Brunschwig, and Silvia Venturini Fendi for this incredible opportunity,” said Jones after his appointment. “Working across two such prestigious houses is a true honor as a designer and to be able to join the house of Fendi as well as continuing my work at Dior Men’s is a huge privilege.”
Jones is a talented star in the LVMH family, before Dior and Fendi, the London Central Saint Martins graduate worked for seven years at Louis Vuitton as the men’s wear designer. Before that he was creative director for British men’s luxury-goods brand Alfred Dunhill, a role which saw him pick up a Designer Of The Year award at the Fashion Awards. He won the same award again in 2019 for his work at Dior.
Read Next: Silvia Venturini Fendi on Paying Homage to Karl Lagerfeld Through the Fendi Couture Show in Rome

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