Fendi

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Fresh Take On Haute Couture For AW 2022

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Fresh Take On Haute Couture For AW 2022

“I wanted lightness in the clothes this season,” Fendi’s artistic director Kim Jones says of his fresh approach to the brand’s autumn/winter 2022 haute couture collection. Below, Anders Christian Madsen shares his key takeaways from the show.

Kim Jones debuted a lighter take on haute couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

There was a lightness to the savoir-faire Kim Jones presented for Fendi on Thursday afternoon in Palais Brongniart, which uplifted his take on haute couture with a new freshness. As the show progressed, he quite literally peeled off the layers until the lightness reached a point of near-nudity, with buoyant embroidered overlays floating ethereally over the models’ skin. “It’s pretty light,” he concurred during a preview. “I wanted lightness in the clothes this season, also in terms of how the embroideries were done.” If Jones’s first forays into couture at Fendi were about showcasing his discoveries of the magic made possible by the artisans of this haute institution through multi-layered craftsmanship, this season represented a clean slate, and one that felt like a way of using haute couture as a proposal for ideas that could trickle into real life.

It featured Kata Yuzen motifs from Japan
Photo: Gorunway.com

It all began with a trip to Japan in March, before the borders opened. “I managed to get in. I was so determined,” Jones said, hinting at some next-level string-pulling. “I used to go six times a year. I love it so much. We went to see a number of the suppliers we’ve always worked with on special projects, and I bought all these fragments of 17th-century kimonos. Just pieces of hand-painted silk fabric.” His finds prompted him to contact a family of traditional Kata Yuzen fabric-makers in Kyoto, whom he knew from previous collaborations. “They hadn’t really been working very much because there were no ceremonies in two years. I asked if they would like to do something with us.” The results were a series of beautiful fragment patterns in pastel colors, which Jones worked into column dresses that cut a monastic silhouette for the collection that felt decidedly Fendi.
It was a real-life approach to couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

“With me, when I’m looking at stuff, I’m always thinking past, present, future. The past is the research, the present is now, and the future is the idea of where it’s going to go,” Jones said, referring to the optical white box that framed the show and added the sense of futurism to proceedings, which was also present in his previous haute couture show. It had a simplifying effect on a collection that felt like a real consideration for how haute couture might be used in everyday life – by the lucky few – and, more importantly, how it might serve to push and inspire ideas for ready-to-wear. Take for instance the scalloped embroideries that adorned a two-piece set, which was, essentially, a T-shirt and a slouchy trouser. Along with the Kata Yuzen, these motifs and techniques felt ripe for ready-to-wear adaptation.
Jones gave us daywear couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

Jones also made pragmatic proposals for daywear couture. The two exquisitely-cut tailored looks that opened the show were created from the finest vicuna, a tactility Jones went on to interpret in the knitted dresses that followed. “Loro Piana always send me a piece of vicuna for Christmas. I always make myself a nice tailored coat out of it,” he quipped, but those desires are entirely universal. Of the knitwear, Jones said it was all about creating a super-luxe lightness for real-life (the extravagant kind, in any case). “I wanted to have some light knitwear pieces for, you know, that jet-set lifestyle of the client. They can wear that on the plane and get off and still [feel] fabulous.” Seeing Jones tackle the idea of real-life daywear in his haute couture was great and created a real affinity with his ready-to-wear collections.
Jones has the same birth chart as Karl Lagerfeld
Photo: Gorunway.com

Asked by Suzy Menkes if he’s the new Karl Lagerfeld – what with his multi-faceted work schedule and all – Jones laughed. “I don’t think I’m the new Karl, but I have exactly the same birth chart. I like to work hard.” In the case of this collection, his hard work was in the detail: a subtle, muted and pared-back illustration of the painstaking art form that is haute couture. “Fendi is about a working woman. A woman that’s powerful,” he said, reflecting on the role of the collection in the real world. “I love the colors. I’m really happy with it.”

Originally published in Vogue.co.uk 
Read next: How Louis Vuitton, Dior And Fendi Are Selling On Their Leftover Fabrics

Imaan Hammam Joins Adut Akech, Naomi Campbell, and More in the Fendi X Versace Campaign

Imaan Hammam Joins Adut Akech, Naomi Campbell, and More in the Fendi X Versace Campaign

Photo: Courtesy Fendi and Versace
First announced back in September 2021, fashion houses Fendi and Versace’s collaborative line, aka #Fendace, dropped today in Dubai, Los Angeles, Kuwait, Paris and Tokyo, and as expected, has received a wave of appreciation from fashion enthusiasts. Featuring the iconic Naomi Campbell, Moroccan-Egyptian-Dutch model Imaan Hammam, South Sudanese-Australian beauty Adut Akech, American model of South Sudanese heritage Anok Yai, Ethiopia’s Amar Akway, Lina Zhang from China, and Anja Rubik from Poland, the campaign was shot by none other than Steven Meisel, and seamlessly embodies the fun, playful vibe of the line.
Photo: Courtesy Fendi and Versace
Marrying Fendi’s love for logomania with Versace’s globally-loved baroque patterns, the Fendace collection pops with a vibrant palette and lots of sparkle. “It’s a swap rather than a collaboration and, most of all, it is done out of friendship,” Kim Jones shared. “It is the beauty of togetherness after time apart and a celebration of women who have inspired me so much.”

And it looks like Donatella Versace couldn’t agree more. “The campaign captures the same sense of friendship and energy we had when we were designing the collection. Kim is a visionary designer and innovator. To me, Fendace will always mean love,” the designer said.
Photo: Courtesy Fendi and Versace

Among the most exciting creations to be found in the new Fendace collection are the reinvented versions of two classics. Versace’s signature La Medusa bag will be available in two alternate print finishes, with the La Medusa plaque sharing space with Fendi FF trims, and the Trigreca sneakers can be seen doused in Versace’s gold baroque work and Fendi’s trademark print.

Exclusive: Adwoa Aboah is a “Fashionable Superwoman” in Fendi’s New Peekaboo Bag Film

Exclusive: Adwoa Aboah is a “Fashionable Superwoman” in Fendi’s New Peekaboo Bag Film

Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
In celebration of the new Peekaboo Petite and Micro handbags, Fendi has joined forces with Italian film director and friend of the house, Luca Guadagnino, to create a short film starring former Vogue Arabia cover star Adwoa Aboah. The campaign film created by the Call Me By Your Name director features the top model soaring through Rome over through its rooftops before eventually landing on Fendi’s Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
“With the DNA of Fendi being Rome, we, of course, talked about Rome – but instead of being in Rome, being above Rome,” says Guadagnino of the film’s concept. “We had this idea of levity – of the Peekaboo bag, at the center of the movie, being the magical driver behind Adwoa flying over the ancient city.”
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Aboah was chosen by the Italian fashion house for their shared values around women empowerment and independence. The film sees her depicted as a “fashionable incarnation of superwoman” flying over Rome’s skies in a dreamlike fantasy before touching down on Earth to determine her fate, claiming her own autonomy. “I think that carrying a Peekaboo says something about a very strong, powerful, and empowered person who is not afraid to hide,” says Silvia Venturini Fendi, creative director of Fendi. “It has its two compartments — one you can keep close to you and closed, and the other where you can choose to reveal something of yourself to the world.”
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
“I feel part of Fendi,” says Guadagnino of working with the fashion house. “I am very close friends with Fendi – as a brand for sure but, most importantly, as a friend of people who are pillars of the company. I feel a very deep connection with the brand – and my mother used to wear Fendi back in the 70s and 80s so the logo, the type of materials, the quality and the design of Fendi have always been part of my imagery.”
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Read Next: 5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Soft-Meets-Hard Milan Fashion Week Fall 2022 Show

The 35 Best Modest Looks from Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2022

The 35 Best Modest Looks from Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2022

Milan Fashion Week came back strong after two years in the deep due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Making bold choices, participating designers played with the fall and winter season colors of black, brown, white, beige, blue, and silver/grey, creating an almost dark/light academia aesthetic. Standing out were Roberto Cavalli’s striking leopard patterns with draping suit jackets and majestic cape dresses, while Dolce & Gabbana made statements with headscarves paired with demure silhouettes in monochrome palettes. Versace embraced a similar mood, but with form-fitting shapes, and Jil Sander took on a more formal approach and offered a modest suit in yellow and a grey dress paired with white leather gloves.
Below, check out the 35 best modest looks spotted on the runways of Milan Fashion Week.
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Alberta Ferretti. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Prada. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Alberta Ferretti. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Loro Piana. Photo: Courtesy of Loro Piana
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillipo Fior
Moschino. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Emporio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Max Mara. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Fendi. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Giorgio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Bottega Veneta. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Fendi. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Etro. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Jil Sander. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Prada. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Jil Sander. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Versace. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Gucci. Photo: Courtesy of GoRunway
Bottega. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Emporio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni
Giorgio Armani. Photo: Courtesy of Fillippo Fior
Read Next: The 27 Best Modest Looks from London Fashion Week Fall 2022 Ready-to-Wear

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Soft-Meets-Hard Milan Fashion Week Fall 2022 Show

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Soft-Meets-Hard Milan Fashion Week Fall 2022 Show

Bella Hadid at Fendi
The collection referenced Fendi’s SS00 collection
 Since joining Fendi a year ago, Kim Jones has been exploring the codes of Fendi and what they could mean to a new generation of shoppers. Because this house was built around fur and handbags, that’s no easy task. While everybody knows the Fendi logo designed by Karl Lagerfeld, “the Fendi look” is perhaps more elusive. “I’m still working them out, but I’m looking at points in time which are relevant for now,” he said backstage, referring to those codes. “Particularly, the spring/summer 2000 show was something I really always looked at, even when I was at college.” That collection epitomized what Lagerfeld, with typical loaded elegance, would refer to as “the unbearable lightness of being”: lightweight, diaphanous, buoyant garments, which he’d sometimes layer to create filtrage effects that looked like modern art.
It also referenced Fendi’s SS86 collection

Jones fused his memories of SS00 with reinterpretations of the prints Lagerfeld used in his spring/summer 1986 collection for Fendi, an ode to the geometric language of the Memphis movement. “I’m not a fan of nostalgia, but when something is really good and it feels right to look at, I do it. I’ve been looking at lots of the codes of the house, and, you know, he was there for 54 years so it’s hard to ignore,” Jones said, referring to Lagerfeld. The fusion between the two memories made for a Fendi collection that sometimes evoked the late designer’s spirit, but through a lens adjusted to the sexier, more sensual, more erotic female image that currently surrounds us on social media.
It was soft vs hard

“There’s something quite lingerie about Fendi,” Jones said, referring to the transparent slip dresses, bustiers, and pyjama-like shirts and trousers that embodied the soft side of the collection. In contrast, tailoring – also informed by the SS86 collection – was sharp, tight, and layered with tonal panels that had an industrial quality to them. That sensibility was heightened by the tunnel-like concrete runway Jones had erected within Fendi’s in-house show space, adding a certain chilliness to looks otherwise often tactile in spirit. “Concrete and chiffon and how that can be put together. Women are hard and soft,” Jones pointed out.
Delfina Delettrez inspired the Memphis idea

At Fendi, Jones’s methodology is family-focused. Working side-by-side with Silvia Venturini Fendi and her daughter Delfina Delettrez, he observes the way the Fendi women dress, shop and borrow from one another. It was, in fact, Delettrez who inspired the re-introduction of the Memphis collection. “Delfina came in, in one of the Memphis blouses, and I loved it so much that I took it off her back and put it on the research rail. That was how that started,” he said, referring to a print blouse Delettrez had nicked from her mother’s wardrobe. Both women are excellent muses – Venturini’s handsome, tailored elegance could definitely play inspiration to a future Fendi collection as depicted by Jones.
There were more bags than ever

Any collection that seeks to explore and define the codes of Fendi would have to be bag-centric. Jones and Venturini – the brand’s head of accessories – went all out, embellishing almost every look with a bag, and sometimes several, like the miniature bags attached to the clothes. New bags included additions to Fendi’s Hand-in-Hand project, which commissions artisans from around Italy to interpret the Baguette, as well as three Baguette revivals: one in cashmere, one in shearling-lined leather, and one in intarsia mink. “That was the thing for me when I first came to Fendi: I knew the handbags much better than the clothes,” Jones said. “Silvia does an amazing job, and I like to celebrate that because I love Silvia.”
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

One Day, Three Outfits: Jennifer Lopez Is Nailing the Matchy Layered Look During Her Marry Me Press Tour

One Day, Three Outfits: Jennifer Lopez Is Nailing the Matchy Layered Look During Her Marry Me Press Tour

In Fendi. Photo: Instagram.com/robzangardi
Jennifer Lopez‘s enviable style is having its time in the spotlight even more than usual of late, as the star promotes her upcoming film, Marry Me. And while doing so in the winter season calls for being styled in cozy, layered outfits, it has not put a damper on Lopez’s ability to make headlines for her looks.
In New York, ahead of her appearance on The Today Show, the Hustlers actor was spotted putting a spin on the monochrome look as we know it. All three pieces in her ensemble, courtesy of Fendi, were covered in a beautiful marbled blue pattern. The look consisted of a silk dress topped with an oversized velvet trench coat that cinched at the waist with a metal Fendi O’Lock buckle, and paired with a matching velvet handbag. Lopez completed her look with light brown suede stiletto boots to contrast the pattern-heaviness, which made a return in her second look the same day.
In Roberto Cavalli. Photo: Instagram.com/robzangardi
This time, the ‘Jenny From the Block’ singer opted for the daring snakeskin print in cream and black, which covered her Roberto Cavalli outfit from head to toe. She wore a snakeskin coat on top of a matching turtleneck dress, over a pair of tights and heels in the same pattern. Even though she sported two different beauty looks for her appearances, they both featured soft glam makeup and pared-down hair to balance the boldness of her outfits.
In Valentino. Photo: Instagram.com/robzangardi
The 52-year-old ditched the print-on-print look for her next stop in the press tour but still kept it layered. Visiting Live with Kelly & Ryan to promote the film which also stars Owen Wilson and Maluma, Lopez chose to join Kim Kardashian and Rihanna in wearing one of fashion’s new favorite colors: hot pink. The monochrome look was picked from Valentino‘s SS20 ready-to-wear collection and featured a blazer over a sheer blouse with an oversize bow around the neck, paired with knee-length trousers, and matching platform pumps. For her beauty look this time, Lopez let her hair down, tucked behind her ears and in a sleek middle part, which complimented her glossy lips and defined eyelashes.
Read Next: Jennifer Lopez Shares What’s Changed in Her Rekindled Relationship With Ben Affleck

The Hidden Secrets Behind Your Favorite Fashion Labels

The Hidden Secrets Behind Your Favorite Fashion Labels

Chanel’s 2021/22 Métiers D’art Collection
Ever wondered what were the stories behind the most iconic designs in the world? For years, people have been wearing classic items without really knowing how they came to be, and what exactly their picks mean historically. Some brands, you may have noticed, have developed a clear identity for their most iconic products, in which the source of inspiration can be deciphered easily. Take, for instance, Versace, a fashion house which looks to Medusa for its unmissable logo. Medusa, first found in Greek mythology, made people fall in love with her with no way back. Similarly, Gianni Versace hoped that his creations would have the same effect on the people who wore his clothes.
What’s interesting to note is that the fashion world includes several labels which carry hidden identities and narratives that aren’t known to the public. Coco Chanel’s ‘Premiere’ watch is a great example, as are Celine’s famous ‘Triomphe’ handbags, Fendi’s ‘FF’ logo, and Cartier’s’ ‘Pathere Vendome Armbanduhr’ watch. Lets take a closer, detailed look at what makes these items so special.

Chanel
Photo: Instagram.com/chanel
Art critic Jean-Louis Froment, once stated, “Gabrielle Chanel was a paradox—she extracted beautiful elements from what seemed like a depressed and unhappy stage of her life. Her identity is a mixture of happiness and sadness. I think the paradox in her life gave birth to the contrast of black and white color in her design.” Coco Chanel’s paradoxical nature certainly seems to have come into play when she created the ‘Premiere’ watch. The unconventional design was inspired by Place Vendome, the iconic square in the heart of Paris, where her apartment and atelier were located. This spot was the first and last thing she saw every day for as long as she lived.
Celine
Photo: Instagram.com/celine
While Chanel was inspired by a recurring sight, Céline Vipiana was placed in a slightly different situation. While having her car break down in Paris—right in front of Arc De Triomphe—definitely wasn’t on her schedule, fate did strike the designer at the right time. According to reports, Vipiana was so inspired by the chains surrounding the iconic monument, the double links, which represent two Cs, soon became part of Celine’s house emblem. It’s safe to say that accidents happen for a reason, and sometimes the reason might just be revolutionary.
Cartier
Photo: Instagram.com/cartier
The final hidden secret is Cartier. Louis-Francois Cartiers’ inspiration came from an unorthodox point of view. Serving in the military as a tank driver affected his entire design aesthetic.
The famous Cartier ‘Tank’ watch may not have come into existence if Louis-Francois Cartiers hadn’t served in the military as a tank driver. This iconic watch was inspired by the outer structure of the tank, while the strap of the watch mimics the track and links that can be found under the vehicle.
What’s more, Cartier’s second most-loved timepiece, the ‘Pathere Vendome Armbanduhr’, took its inspiration from the two-man FT-17 tanks employed on the Western Front. “The design is said to mirror a bird’s eye view of the Tank’s small cockpit,” a source reveals.
Fendi
Photo: Instagram.com/fendi
Ever wondered why Fendi’s logo features two Fs? In 1965, Karl Lagerfeld was appointed as the new creative director for the fashion house, and was asked to add a ‘modern touch’ to the brand’s logo. Keeping that in mind, Lagerfeld was able to sketch the ‘FF’ logo in exactly 3 seconds, which stood for ‘Fourrure Folle’, or in other words, ‘fun furs’. While today, the fashion industry no longer supports the usage of fur, at that time, it was a medium that was very much in demand, and Lagerfeld helped push the brand to become one of the top manufacturers.
Read Next: Carrie Bradshaw’s New It-Bag Has Serious Fashion History

The 8 Biggest Moments in the World of Fashion in 2021

The 8 Biggest Moments in the World of Fashion in 2021

Fendi X Versace. Photo: Instagram.com/ellehongkong
What better way to round up 2021 than with a look back at the year’s best fashion brand moments? This year, brands amazed us with unexpected collaborations like Gucci x Balenciaga, major comebacks (hello, Mark Jacobs!) and sadly, a heartbreaking loss too, with the passing of one of the greatest fashion design icons of the 21st century, Virgil Abloh.
Gucci and Balenciaga stunned the fashion world when they announced a collaboration, launching the collection “hack” into stores. Alessandro Michele (creative director for Gucci) used quotes and logos from Demna (creative director for Balenciaga) and mixed them with his personal taste and signatures—the 70’s, suits and feathers. Later in 2021, the link-up between Versace and Fendi, better known as Fendace, was another collab to take note of.
Photo: Instagram.com/gucci
Known for his unexpected surprises, Kanye West announced The First Yeezy x Gap collaboration this year too. Out of nowhere, a cerulean puffer appeared on Gap’s website, which was the first product of the collaboration to be put up for sale. Balenciaga’s Demna definitely had a great year too. Not only was he a part of the collaboration with Gucci, but he also presented his first couture collection this year, a series of  beautifully sculpted gowns, trench coats and haute jeans. And that’s not all for Balenciaga. 2021 was also the year that the brand teamed up with the video game Fortnite and to create an unforeseen  line of skins.
Photo: Instagram.com/voguerunway
While everyone was focused on virtual shows and lookbooks, Marc Jacobs decided to stay old-school in 2021. After being absent from the runway for over a year, he returned with a special showcase at New York’s Public Library. Cocoon shapes and huge platform shoes mixed with holographic dresses and faux furs was the way to go for Jacobs.
Celebrating his 10th anniversary at Balmain this year, creative director Olivier Rousteing brought, strength, bold beauty, diversity, and craftsmanship on to the runway. Balmain’s spring/summer 2022 line was the talk of the town during Paris Fashion Week, which showcased iconic designs from the fashion house’s past decade while being surrounded by iconic women such as supermodel Naomi Campbell. A personal message from Beyoncé was also shared with Rousteing.
Photo: Instagram.com/olivier_rousteing
After a decade of working as the creative director for Celine, 2021 was also the year that Phoebe Philo launched a brand under her own name. But of all the big moments, nothing resounded quite like the loss of the iconic fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Two days after his death, Abloh’s spring 2022 collection was celebrated at Art Basel in Miami. Friends of the designer including Kim Kardashian, Kanye West and Rihanna were present to pay tribute to the unforgettable talent.
Fendi x Versace. Photo: Instagram.com/ellehongkong
Yeezy x Gap. Photo: Instagram/ yeezyxgap
Balenciaga x Fortnite. Photo: Instagram.com/voguerunway
Virgil Abloh. Photo: Instagram.com/virgilabloh
Phoebe Philo. Photo: Instagram.com/phoebephilodiary
Read Next: From “The Wolf” Haircut to Retinol: 2021’s Most Searched Skincare, Hair and Makeup Trends

Kim and Kim Unleash Fendi X Skims

Kim and Kim Unleash Fendi X Skims

Kim Kardashian for FendixSkims. Photo: Steven Meisel
Just one month on from Kim Jones and Donatella Versace’s “job swap” – which resulted in the star-studded, monogram-tastic “Fendace” runway show at Milan Fashion Week – Fendi’s artistic director has joined forces with fashion’s other Kim, shapewear queen Ms Kardashian West, on a new power collab.
Photo: Vanessa Beecroft
Rumors of the partnership had been floating in fashion circles, and on October 25, friends Jones and Kardashian West confirmed on Instagram that they have indeed collaborated on a limited-edition capsule.
Photo: Steven Meisel
According to the two Kims, the project “unites the luxury of Fendi with the innovation of Skims”, and as is now customary with her Skims drops, Kardashian has modeled the pieces herself. In one campaign shot, captured by Steven Meisel, Kim is joined by Precious Lee, Tianna St Louis, Jessie Li, and Grace Valentine, all of whom are dressed in zingy purple dresses, separates, leggings and gloves.
Precious Lee. Photo: Steven Meisel
More shots of Kardashian West find her in tights scattered with Fendi’s Zucca emblem and the Skims logo, a matching bralette and Jones’s cult F-heeled shoes; or a sculpting khaki bodysuit worn under a monogrammed puffer.
Fendi x Skims launches November 2 with a pop-up at The Dubai Mall’s Fashion Catwalk rotunda, as well as in select stores in the region. Also make a note of November 9, when the collection will drop on new dedicated website Fendiskims.com. Visit now to add yourself to the mailing list.
Read Next: Kim Kardashian’s Balenciaga Obsession is the Gift That Keeps on Giving
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Kate, Amber, and Naomi Lead an Army of Supermodels at a “Fendace” Show to Remember

Kate, Amber, and Naomi Lead an Army of Supermodels at a “Fendace” Show to Remember

Photo: Getty
“Please join me for an intimate creative experience,” read Donatella Versace’s invitation to the fashion pack on the closing day of the Milan spring/summer 2022 shows. The blockbuster production that unfolded on Sunday evening was by no means “intimate” when you consider the scores of fashion fans tuning in across the globe, but creativity between two of the biggest luxury houses in the world certainly abounded. Believe the hype – Fendace has landed. Just don’t call it a Fendi X Versace collaboration.
Gigi Hadid. Photo: Getty
What unfolded was a fabulous switch-up, which saw Donatella Versace and Kim Jones swap roles to create two uniquely brilliant, logo-heavy collections inspired by their friendship and the cultural relevance of the two heavyweight brands they are at the helms of. First up, Jones, the king of transfusing streetwear and subcultural style through a luxury lens, put his mark on Versace with a little help from Kristen McMenamy, Paloma Elsesser, Lila Grace Moss, Karen Elson, Kate Moss, and Amber Valletta.
Naomi Campbell. Photo: Getty
Then, Mona Tougaard, Gigi Hadid, Emily Ratajkowski, and Naomi Campbell brought to life the queen of no-holds-barred glamour Donatella’s Fendi vision, as Drake, Future, and Young Thug blasted out their latest song with intermittent “Ciao! Donatella!” broadcasts across the airwaves. It was to borrow the words of Dua Lipa, who opened the Versace spring/summer 2022 show on Friday and sat front row at the special showcase.
Donatella and Kim taking a bow surrounded by the supers. Photo: Getty
Even more sizzling? Elizabeth Hurley, who sat front row with her son Damian, Iris Law, and Winnie Harlow. The original Versace girl – who put the brand’s now-iconic safety-pin embellishment on the map at the premiere of Four Weddings and a Funeral more than 25 years ago – demonstrated the definition of smoldering, while Damian did his own version of Blue Steeling for the cameras.
Demi Moore, Damian, and Liz Hurley. Photo: Getty
Dua Lipa and Winnie Harlow. Photo: Getty
It was a glitzy family affair from start to finish and reflective of the spirit of collaboration currently in the air. While Gucci’s “hacking” of Balenciaga will go down in history and Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons’s co-design partnership breaks new ground, no one can quite dial up the drama like Donatella and Kim. Brava.

Read Next: Dua Lipa Debuts a Major Hair Transformation on the Versace Runway
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

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