Fashion

Global fashion, Luxury

Margot Robbie’s Most Stylish Moments Over the Years

Margot Robbie’s Most Stylish Moments Over the Years

Margot Robbie, one of Hollywood’s most stylish and well-known faces, turns 32 on Saturday.Since her breakthrough role as Naomi Lapaglia in the 2013 hit dark comedy “The Wolf of Wall Street,” the Australian actress has starred in some of the biggest movies worldwide and inked high-profile ambassadorships with luxury brands, one of which is Chanel.
Though she’s worked closely with Chanel and its then creative director Karl Lagerfeld for years, she was eventually named a brand ambassador in March 2018. Robbie is reportedly the last ambassador chosen by the legendary German couturier before his death in February 2019.
RELATED: Click through the above gallery to see some of Margot Robbie’s most fashion-forward looks over the years.

Robbie has worn some of the most memorable creations by the French luxury fashion house to events such as the Oscars, the Golden Globes and movie premieres.

Related Galleries

One of the most notable looks was her dress at the 2018 Academy Awards. The white gown, custom-designed by Lagerfeld himself, featured intricate draped off-the-shoulder embroidered detailing with a matching bag and jewelry. She wore her hair in a short bob, which was supposed to align with the ‘90s mood she and her longtime stylist Kate Young were aiming for.

Her press tour outfits for her 2019 movie, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” featured an array of dresses and hairstyles that paid homage to Hollywood fashion icons such as Lauren Hutton and Sharon Tate, the latter of whom Robbie played in the movie.
For events, the actress has also worn the likes of Valentino, Miu Miu, Prada, Versace, Zimmermann and more, working closely with Young for years. The stylist also works with other stars such as Sienna Miller, Selena Gomez and Dakota Johnson.
Throughout her career so far, Robbie has starred in films such as “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot,” “I, Tonya,” “Mary, Queen of Scots,” “Bombshell” and “Birds of Prey,” among others.
She has also produced several successful projects such as the Hulu series “Dollface,” “Promising Young Woman” and Netflix miniseries “Maid.” She has been nominated for numerous accolades, including two Academy Awards and three Golden Globes.
Robbie has been tapped to star in Greta Gerwig’s “Barbie” movie, playing the titular role alongside Ryan Gosling who will play Ken. The movie is scheduled for release in July 2023.
READ MORE HERE:
Margot Robbie and Ryan Gosling Go Rollerblading in Neon ‘90s Looks for ‘Barbie’ Movie
Pharrell Williams, Margot Robbie Watch Charlotte Casiraghi Open Chanel Show on Horseback
Margot Robbie Channels Sharon Tate at ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ Premiere

Royals in Pantsuits: 28 Times Queen Rania, Princess Diana, and More Inspired Us To Power Dress

Royals in Pantsuits: 28 Times Queen Rania, Princess Diana, and More Inspired Us To Power Dress

Photo: Instagram.com
‘Power dressing’—the act of styling oneself to assert authority, most commonly in a finely tailored suit—has long been a fine art. In the Seventies, the trousers were flared and fabulous; the Eighties were defined by bigger-means-better shoulder pads; and by the end of 90s, it was all about a relaxed yet perfectly proportioned fit. But one theme has stuck throughout the power suit’s metamorphosis: it’s backed by a legion of ultra-stylish royals.
Princess Anne was an early adopter of women’s tailoring, wearing white suits reminiscent of Bianca Jagger in Yves Saint Laurent as far back as 1973. Later, Diana, Princess of Wales led the pack with an androgynous appeal. The Countess of Wessex took the baton in the early Oughts in a plethora of pastel sets, and now, the Duchesses of Cambridge and Sussex compete for best dressed, buttoned up in Alexander McQueen and Loro Piana. Queen Letizia of Spain keeps it bold in vivid hues, Charlotte Casiraghi opts for tweed from Chanel or Gucci, and Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden has a penchant for prints.
Those in need of some powerful wardrobe inspiration, look no further. See below some of our favorite royal tailoring moments.

Queen Rania
At the Queen Rania Teacher Academy, 2021
Photo: Instagram.com
The Duchess Of Cambridge

At the Royal Foundation Centre for Early Childhood, 2022
Photo: Getty
Queen Letizia of Spain

At the Creade Refugees Centre, 2022
Photo: Getty
Diana, Princess of Wales

At Wembley Stadium, 1988
Photo: Getty
Queen Rania
At the HeForShe IMPACT Summit, New York, 2018
Photo: Instagram.com
Princess Anne

Visiting a theatre, 1973
Photo: Getty
The Duchess of Cambridge

In Kingston, Jamaica, 2022
Photo: Getty
The Duchess of Sussex 

At the Invictus Games, 2022
Photo: Getty
Queen Rania
Jordan, 2021
Photo: Instagram.com
Diana, The Princess Of Wales

At the Connaught Hotel, 1997
Photo: Getty
The Countess of Wessex

At Chelsea Flower Show, 2022
Photo: Getty
Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden

Visiting the research vessel ‘Skagerrak’, 2022
Photo: Getty
The Duchess of Cambridge

Visiting Ulster University Magee Campus, 2021
Photo: Getty
Diana, Princess of Wales

At the Royal Albert Hall, 1990
Photo: Getty
The Countess of Wessex

At the V&A Museum, 2005
Photo: Getty
Diana, Princess Of Wales

At a gala, 1986
Photo: Getty
Queen Letizia of Spain

Visiting La Otra Corte, 2019
Photo: Getty
Princess Sofia of Sweden 

At the Medals of Merit presentation, 2018
Photo: Getty
Queen Letizia of Spain

Visiting a students’ residence, 2020
Photo: Getty
The Duchess of Sussex

With the Duke of Sussex in Ireland, 2018
Photo: Getty
Queen Elizabeth II

At King Edward VII Hospital, 2003
Photo: Getty
The Duchess of Sussex

At Royal Lancaster Hotel, 2018
Photo: Getty
Charlotte Casiraghi 

At the Gucci Paris Masters, 2012
Photo: Getty
Crown Princess Mary of Denmark

Visiting the Designloungeon, 2017
Photo: Getty
Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden

At the Fryshuset Foundation, 2022
Photo: Getty
Princess Eugenie of York

With Misha Nonoo at a fashion event, 2019
Photo: Getty
Princess Isabella of Denmark

During her confirmation, 2022
Photo: Getty
Crown Princess Mary of Denmark

Visiting the Royal Academy of Arts, 2022
Photo: Getty

Originally published in Tatler.com
Read next: Queen Rania Gives the Denim-on-Denim Trend a Royal Spin With This Outfit

Back to Business for Paris Men’s Trade Shows

Back to Business for Paris Men’s Trade Shows

PARIS — It wasn’t just the city that was crowded during the recent men’s fashion week here; trade show organizers breathed a sigh of relief last weekend as buyers returned to events including Tranoï and Man after two years of scaled-back editions.“Buyers are not just here, but they are writing orders, including some for first collections, which is rare,” summed up Tranoï chief executive officer Boris Provost. “We’ve seen the return of American, Japanese and South Korean buyers, which is great.”
With positive feedback about its shift toward a more designer-focused positioning, Tranoï, which ran from June 24 to 26, is reaping the rewards of its tie-up with the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, signed last year, thanks to synergies with the federation’s Sphere showroom for young designers and its high-traffic location at the Palais de Tokyo.

Related Galleries

The show, which highlighted the work of 42 designers — mainly menswear and accessories — ramped up its event program, hosting runway presentations for three labels, LYPH, DenzilPatrick and David Tlale, in the courtyard of the venue. This attracted buyers and press who would not traditionally attend a trade show, Provost said.

The DenzelPatrick presentation at Tranoi.
ALEXANDRE GALLOSi/Courtesy of Tranoi

“People have come back for our third collection,” concurred Daniel Gayle, founder of U.K.-based DenzilPatrick, who is in talks with several major department stores. A second-time exhibitor, he developed a colorful collection exploring identity with lots of quirky references to school life and teenage angst.
“This is our first Tranoi, and it has been better than multibrand showrooms,” said Frederick Edmonson, founder of LYPH. “The big buyers take their time to do the walk-through, and we’ve written orders.”
Over at Man, which returned to its Pavillon Vendôme venue with around 60 labels for three days through June 26, for the first time since the beginning of the pandemic, traffic was brisk and Man/Woman director Antoine Floch said exhibitors and buyers responded well to the scaled-back concept in a single location.
“I recently asked historic exhibitors what they disliked about the most recent pre-pandemic editions of the show, and unanimously, they said it had got too big,” he said. “Around 70 to 80 brands is the sweet spot.”
The show featured a mixture of established labels like Wood Wood, Gitman Vintage and Veja Paris alongside newcomers. “They all hit their objectives by the end of the first day,” Floch said. “People were really happy to be back together again.”
Buyers were shopping for statement styles, observers said. “My store went from mid-high to high-end during COVID-19,” summed up Randy Hoogeweegen, owner of About Lifestyle in Amsterdam. (He is also cofounder of the Ampère brand, featured below.) “People are looking for special pieces, spending much more but keeping items longer,” he said.
Of the direction for men’s collections this season, “There is a more ornamental touch to all the collections, it’s more refined, whereas the last couple of seasons were very bright.”
While the men’s calendar was a trade-show down on January — View, which debuted earlier this year, did not repeat the exercise — there was also a new event in town.

Inside DRP
KIM WEBER/Courtesy of WSN

Staged by Première Classe’s organizer WSN, DRP is a consumer-facing show targeting drop culture, and ran for three days until June 25 at the Grand Palais Ephemère. It integrated footwear forum Sneakerness as well as a selection of streetwear labels, with spaces showcasing new technology including DRP’s own metaverse and Futures Factory, an NFT specialist for the sneaker industry that raised 2.5 million euros in funding last year, as well as a gaming zone, and an area for skate and basketball workshops and competitions that doubled up as a concert space in the evening.
The organizers were expecting 10,000 visitors over the three-day program through June 25, but exhibitors said footfall had been slower than expected, and had been more interesting in terms of business contacts than for sales.
“It’s a lot quieter than expected,” said Anthony Deshoux, founder of the Missive label, which offers streetwear that can be personalized and adapted with Velcro letters and patches. “I’ve made good b-to-b contacts, like a museum that wants to take the line, but I think for the target audience, having to pay to get into an event is a barrier.”
Sneakerness habitué Frank — he declined to give his family name — the owner of German reseller Kixery, bemoaned, “Normally at Sneakerness I would have people queueing, there is no-one here.”
Highlights From the Paris Trade Shows

A look from David Tlale
Alan Marty/Courtesy of David Tlale

David Tlale
Showing at: Tranoï
Category: Ready-to-wear
South African designer David Tlale may be new to showing in Paris, but his opulent gender-fluid label has built a strong following at home over the past 19 years. “Over the years, I’ve been coming to Paris as a tourist, and also sourcing and finding materials and inspiration. And now in 2022, I come here as myself, as a designer. It’s really, really humbling,” he told WWD after his presentation. “Honestly, it’s daunting, because you’re presenting to the heartbeat of fashion, and people look at your signature, and also what you stand for, with a different eye. Yes, I may be celebrated in my country, but coming here, it’s like starting from scratch and rebuilding the brand.” The designer also fosters young creatives through an internship program launched in 2012. “I think I could proudly say the brand David Tlale has introduced about seven solid brands that are currently building and working hard in South Africa. So our brand is not only about just fashion, but it’s really leaving a legacy,” he said.

Pricing: 4,000 to 28,000 South African rand retail, or $250 to $1,760 at current exchange

A look from Llosa
Antoine Guilloteau/courtesy of Llosa

Llosa
Showing at: Tranoï
Category: Menswear
After working as a designer and consultant in the activewear space for 20 years, Fred Llosa decided to combine his expertise with his passion for menswear. “I’m trying to combine the cleanness of tailoring with the flexibility of sportswear,” he explained. With oversize yet structured silhouettes and textured details, he seeks to renew the menswear color palette with dusty, muted pastel shades. After launching the label in 2020 and seeing success with a series of Paris pop-ups, this was his first season opening up for wholesale.
Pricing: 250 euros on average at retail

A look from Ampère
Courtesy of Ampère

Ampère
Showing at: Man
Category: Menswear
Now in its third season, Amsterdam-based Ampère is a high-end men’s label focused on combining embellished details like lace, embroidery and guipure with sportswear silhouettes. “We wanted to make menswear more romantic,” explained cofounder Aleks Kuijpers, a textile specialist who joined with Randy Hoogeweegen, the owner of two About Lifestyle luxury menswear boutiques in Amsterdam, to combine their respective expertise and offer an elevated contemporary wardrobe.
Pricing: 100 to 795 euros retail

A look from Untitled Artworks
Courtesy of Untitled Artworks

Untitled Artworks
Showing at: Man
Category: Streetwear
Graphic designer Erasmo Ciufo has worked with some of the biggest streetwear brands, including Off-White and Adidas. After seeing success with one-off pieces he had created, he decided to launch his own brand, and his first collection introduced in January garnered around 30 stockists, including H.Lorenzo. “I’m humbled by this attention, I’ve always been working in the background for big brands,” he told WWD. With his second wholesale collection, titled “Belonging,” the lineup with a lived-in feel and graphic details was designed to explore shared symbolism and young people’s desire to customize their clothing. Buyers were gravitating to statement pieces in the lineup like outsize knits, he said.
Pricing: 150 to 400 euros retail

A look from LYPH
Courtesy of LYPH

LYPH
Showing at: Tranoï

Category: Streetwear
Pronounced “life” and short for “Live Young Play Hard,” the brand is the brainchild of former Paul Smith designer Frederick Edmonson, based in England’s Lake District. Launched in 2015, the brand uses recycled fabrics and materials and is inspired by popular culture, and is a finalist for this year’s British Fashion Council x GQ Designer Fashion Fund. Its designs are based on utilitarian details with a mix-and-match approach, with snap-on pockets that can be combined with different pieces in the collection or zip-on panels that can be interchanged. There was also a capsule of black-and-white pieces featuring QR codes that link to the brand’s “Therapy Sessions” platform, which offers a library of free wellbeing content.
Pricing: 155 to 680 pounds retail

A look from Isnurh
Courtesy of Isnurh

Isnurh
Showing at: Tranoï
Category: Contemporary menswear
Founded in 2017, sustainably focused label Isnurh, based in Copenhagen, offers a concept combining Scandinavian minimalism with craft influences. With a collection made 60 percent from deadstock fabrics — from an allover terry cloth shirt and joggers with a pastel print to placement details on a trenchcoat, for example — the label is seeing rapid growth thanks to celebrity endorsements, and counts department stores Illum and Magasin du Nord among its stockists in Denmark. The lineup includes Tencel shirts made in partnership with tech company Rodinia printed using an innovative waterless technique with biodegradable inks.
Pricing: 97 to 540 euros retail

A look from De Pino
Courtesy of De Pino

De Pino
Showing at: Tranoï
Category: Ready-to-wear
Paris-based La Cambre graduate Gabriel Figueiredo, who did a stint in Maison Margiela’s embroidery workshop, launched his genderless label in 2020, combining feminine and naive, childlike references in his silhouettes in black and off-white using largely recycled fabrics. With a wardrobe going from elaborate eveningwear — a cape covered in giant 3D daffodils was a standout — through tweed jackets to crochet knitwear and jogging pants, everything is designed to be mixed and matched.
Pricing: 140 to 810 euros direct-to-consumer

Models with a design from A3

A3 Studio

Showing at: DRP
Category: Accessories
Part of the Revibe space at DRP — featuring a selection of labels supported by the French upcycling marketplace — A3 Studio was created by father Adel Haddidi and his son and daughter. The label buys new but unworn sneakers and transforms them into quirky bags, adding chain hardwear, for example. For the moment, everything is done by hand in Paris, but the label is hoping to scale up and work with artisans in Haddidi’s native Kairoun, Tunisia. The brand’s latest venture reuses the soles from the sneakers to create a hybrid with the traditional North African babouche slipper.
Pricing: 250 to 360 euros for bags; footwear (made-to-measure only) 170 to 250 euros.

Lori Harvey Goes Preppy-chic in Chanel to Support Her Skn Brand at Black Beauty Roster Luncheon

Lori Harvey Goes Preppy-chic in Chanel to Support Her Skn Brand at Black Beauty Roster Luncheon

Lori Harvey is celebrating her success as a new entrepreneur.
On June 24, the model attended a luncheon hosted by the Black Beauty Roster, a collective that focuses on highlighting the work of Black beauty creatives in television, film, entertainment and fashion.
For the luncheon, Harvey wore a look by Chanel, which was a baby pink sleeveless knit, an orange mini tweed skirt paired with a small pearl-adorned white bucket bag and white heels by Femme. She styled her hair half-up and half-down to show her pearl drop earrings. She is usually styled by Maeve Reilly, who also works with the likes of Megan Fox.

Lori Harvey during the BBR Hosts Celebration in Black Beauty Excellence at The West Hollywood Edition on June 24 in West Hollywood, Calif.
Getty Images for Black Beauty Roster

The event, held at the Edition in West Hollywood, Calif., was to honor top beauty professionals of color and industry leaders behind the lens, including Harvey’s own skin care brand Skn by LH, which she launched in October.

“Did a thing with @blackbeautyroster,” Harvey wrote in the caption for her Instagram highlighting the event. “I love what you all are contributing to the beauty industry by bringing together black beauty entrepreneurs and celebrating all their hard work and success. Thank you guys so much for having me and highlighting @sknbylh.”

Lori Harvey and Simone and Maude during the BBR Hosts Celebration in Black Beauty Excellence at The West Hollywood Edition on June 24 in West Hollywood, Calif.
Getty Images for Black Beauty Roster

Among other notables who attended or spoke at the event include Chelsea Lazkani of Netflix’s “Selling Sunset,” Lauren Speed-Hamilton of Netflix’s “Love Is Blind,” MSNBC host Symone Sanders, the BBR cofounders Simone Tetteh and Maude Okrah, and other key industry influencers such as Sir John and many more.
READ MORE HERE:
Burberry Hosts Dinner With Bella Hadid, Jacob Elordi, Lori Harvey
Lori Harvey Teams Up With Naked Wardrobe
EXCLUSIVE: Chanel to Open Ephemeral Boutique in East Hampton on Friday

Loro Piana Debuts Swimwear With ‘La Dolce Vita’ Collection

Loro Piana Debuts Swimwear With ‘La Dolce Vita’ Collection

GLAM BEACH: Loro Piana is debuting a resortwear collection that pays homage to “La Dolce Vita,” a moniker drawn from Federico Fellini’s namesake movie which epitomizes the quintessentially Italian indulgent lifestyle.The range of beach-ready options includes the first Loro Piana swimwear collection for women, which draws its colors from earthy and natural nuances including kummel, coral, ocean blue, emerald green and sandy beige.
Crafted from marine and aquatic jerseys, the former with a more decidedly sportswear bent, and the latter coming in bikini and swimsuit versions intended to be worn beyond water sports activities, both are embellished with charms shaped like a wave, life belt, boat and boat’s wheel.

The retail price for the one-piece swimsuit is 360 euros and the bikini goes for 390 euros.

Related Galleries

As part of the “La Dolce Vita” collection, the luxury brand under the LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton umbrella is also making a push on accessories, globally seen as strong drivers for luxury sales.
The range includes a new iteration of the brand’s signature White Sole slip-ons bearing the same marine-inspired charms of its swimwear with an 860 euro price tag, and a new summer-inflected handbag called Eolian Basket, which plays on the popular panier style.

Loro Piana’s Eolian Basket handbags part of “La Dolce Vita” collection.
Courtesy of Loro Piana

Crafted from handwoven regenerated organic cotton in a nod to Loro Piana’s knitwear expertise, the bag is enriched by brown calfskin handles woven, according to the macramé technique. A range of knots inspired by boats’ ropes reference the collection’s marine inflection. It is available in three sizes, including a mini, small and large version, the last two framed in calfskin and bearing additional shoulder handles. The bags retail between 900 euros and 2,200 euros.
The collection, which is complemented by other resortwear options in lightweight fabrics, including underpinnings, breezy shirts, roomy pants and technical anoraks, as well as accessories such as crochet cloche hats and striped flats, is available at the brand’s flagship stores and online.

Hailey Bieber Is the Latest Star To Jump on Board the Real-Life Barbie Trend With a Bright Pink Dress

Hailey Bieber Is the Latest Star To Jump on Board the Real-Life Barbie Trend With a Bright Pink Dress

Photo: Instagram.com/haileybieber
Corsetry is a Versace signature, and for autumn/winter 2022, Donatella Versace made it central to the collection. Now, muse Hailey Bieber has become one of the first to road-test Donatella’s new-season corsetry, fresh from the catwalk.
The model and mogul orchestrated an Instagram photoshoot wearing Look 12 from the collection: a satin corset mini dress with intricate boning skimming the chest, torso and side seams, embellished with bejeweled Medusa motifs on the straps.
Hailey accessorized her look with layered Tiffany & Co. jewelry. Photo: Instagram.com/haileybieber
Hailey’s chosen shade? Pink, of course, perfectly in line with the rise of Barbiecore. Stylist Karla Welch posted a picture of the model in her bubblegum look with the caption: “Paging the Barbie movie.”
Nicola Peltz Beckham is another famous fan of Versace corsets. The actor, who incorporated a number of Versace looks into her wardrobe for her wedding celebrations, told Vogue at the time: “There’s just nothing that feels better than a Versace corset… The fit is impeccable. It makes you feel sexy, but classy at the same time. Versace is just the perfect thing to put on after a big bridal gown.”
Versace autumn/winter 2022. Photo: Instagram.com/haileybieber
While Nicola kept her bridal accessories to a minimum, Hailey dialed up the glamour in layered Tiffany & Co. diamond and chain necklaces, and a pair retro white boots from Naked Wolfe. Extra? That’s exactly what she was going for. As she put it on Instagram: “Having a little extra fun today.”
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk
Read next: Hailey Bieber Wore Three Powerful Minidresses in 24 Hours

How India and the Middle East Have Influenced Each Other’s Fashion Industries Over the Years

How India and the Middle East Have Influenced Each Other’s Fashion Industries Over the Years

Deepika Padukone in Saudi’s Ashi Studio. Photo: Courtesy of Ashi Studio
When one considers everyday dress in India, the salwar — a pair of loose-fitting, drawstring trousers, and the kameez — a tunic worn with a dupatta — a scarf also used as a head covering — probably come to mind. The roots of this dress style can be attributed to Persia, home of the Mughals, the Muslim dynasty that ruled India from the early 16th to the mid-18th century. The Arabian Gulf played an important role, too. The two regions not only have a geographic proximity to each other, but have been trading partners for centuries. The fact that the word kameez comes from Arabic is one such proof. India has always been known for its textile traditions, and its goods would reach central Europe via the ports of the Gulf. Scientists from the Museum of Natural History in Paris, while examining remnants from UNESCO world heritage site Mleiha, found that the earliest cotton in the Arab world came from Northwestern India, and the oldest surviving pieces of chintz, a calico cloth decorated with woodblock prints that became popular in Europe in the 1600s, was found in Egypt. Textiles, crafts, and silhouettes from India became a source of inspiration, with many of the mirror and metal embroidery forms in Arab dressing traditions influenced by savior fair coming from its South Asian trading partner. In turn, the motifs and decorative forms of this region began to influence embroidery patterns in India. The cultural exchange between the two is ancient and can still be seen today.
Aishwarya Rai Bachchan wears a dress by Lebanon’s Elie Saab. Photo: Getty
Contemporary Indian designers have been borrowing and showing their appreciation of the Middle East for years. Rohit Bal, known as the enfant terrible of Indian fashion, made the jalabiya part of his design repertoire since his early days in the 1990s. Manish Malhotra, Bollywood’s go-to costumer, designed his 2018 couture collection ‘Zween’ in celebration of Middle Eastern culture. Meanwhile, Indian Gen Z’s favored silhouette is the kaftan. In return, the Middle Eastern region has welcomed Indian designers with open arms; fashion shows and pop-up events are regularly hosted in the region.
Salman Khan and Katrina Kaif in Indian couturier Manish Malhotra’s 2018 ‘Zween’ couture collection
When Indian celebrities are looking to make a statement on the red carpet at international events, time and again they turn to designers based in the Middle East. Aishwarya Rai Bachchan is known for her love of Michael Cinco and Elie Saab, and Priyanka Chopra has been photographed in Zuhair Murad on multiple occasions. Deepika Padukone, who wore a custom-made Zuhair Murad gown to her wedding reception in 2018, stepped out onto this year’s Cannes Film Festival red carpet wearing an orange, one-shoulder gown by Ashi Studio. It was her most well-received look of the festival. The Paris-based Saudi label has been worn by many well-known Indians including Sonam Kapoor Ahuja and heiress Isha Ambani. “There is a similar aesthetic in terms of taste and culture, and both regions love their glamor,” comments the couturier. Celebrity stylist Shaleena Nathani who styles Padukone, adds, “The region has a strong love of Bollywood, so they have a good understanding of our celebrities and occasions, and this does help. As a stylist, the reason I turn to Middle Eastern designers is because of their cut, it flatters an Indian body.” She chose the Ashi dress as it had drama, something she considers essential when walking the red carpet, and was both sensual and modest. This is a balance Middle Eastern designers have always understood.
Priyanka Chopra wears Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad. Photo: Getty
One such designer is Reema Ameer, who is of Sri Lankan and Lebanese descent. She moved to Dubai 16 years ago, working from her studio at home in Dubai. Nathani notes that both regions have a heritage of craftsmanship and bespoke detailing, an important binding factor between the dressing styles. Nathani recently received much attention in India as actress Neetu Kapoor, the mother of actor Ranbir Kapoor, has been wearing her designs on repeat. “If European clients are more understated and individual in their approach to style, the Middle Eastern and Indian markets prefer a more groomed image. In that vein, there is a shared appreciation for hand-crafted textiles from beadwork to embroidery, which automatically ups the luxe factor, too. My Arab and Indian clients share a love for color and sparkle. I would say that they are both daring in their sense of style, and always open to trying new things.”
On the other side of the Arabian Sea are the Indian designers for whom the Gulf is almost an extension of their own market, with many Indian designers looking to open stores in Dubai, and seeking to make in-roads into Qatar, Kuwait, and Saudi. Designers Sabyasachi Mukherjee, Manish Malhotra, and Suneet Varma all come to the region to host pop-ups, with Mukherjee’s jewelry instore at Dubai-based concept, Bayt Damas. Mumbai-based Anita Dongre, one of India’s most successful designers, who retails on the Ounass platform and has participated in pop-ups in the Gulf, comments, “This is a region where old-world traditions and charms meet cutting-age technology and lived experiences. Like India, there is a value for culture and tradition, but people are also happy to celebrate 21st-century progress and modernity. There is an overlap in both regions’ dressing styles.” Delhi-based Rajdeep Ranawat, who retails in a multi-brand boutique in Dubai’s Jumeriah and who is also part of the Ounass edit, adds, “There is a vast South Asian community living here today, they are bound to visit boutiques and exhibitions for their social wardrobe essentials.” This explains why pop-ups in cities like Dubai, Doha, and Riyadh are now a part of an Indian fashion designer’s calendar. Ranawat says the UAE alone accounts for 15% of his turnover, and that today, many of his clients are Arab. Since Indian designers are open to making customized changes and have a tendency to be more modest in their approach to designs, their fashion is appreciated. “The Middle East is an important fashion hub for Indian designers,” he asserts. Given the historical relationship between the two regions and similarities in approach to dressing, it is a very natural relationship. As both India and the Middle East continue to affirm themselves as leaders in the fashion space, their long-term affection for each other will only help them thrive.
Originally published in the July/August 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia
Read Next: An Ode to Pink and India-Middle East Ties: Inside Vogue Arabia’s July/August 2022 Issue

July/August’s – The Summer Escape Issue with Zeynab El-Helw

July/August’s – The Summer Escape Issue with Zeynab El-Helw

Fashion

by Amy Sessions
1 minute ago

Creative Direction: Amy SessionsPhotography: Greg AdamskiCover Star: Zeynab El-HelwMakeup & Hair: Melanie Meyer at MMG ArtistsProduction: Olivia MorrisFashion Editor: Dan RobinsonFashion Assistant: Sarah JosephWith special thanks to SĀN BeachAll crystals Motion Trading
Welcome to The Summer Escape Issue.
This issue encourages you to explore and unwind as summer unfolds.
For our Mykonos-inspired cover shoot Good Vibes Only, we partnered with eco-positive brand Reborn Society – founded by Zeynab El-Helw.
We have exclusive interviews with all the best resort wear brands from co-founder of Ancient Greek Sandals, Christina Martini in Greek Odyssey, Brittany Kozerski Freeney, founder of Jade Swim in The Minimalist, Linda Hausser, Alexandra Miro in Beachside and Deiji Studios in Cool Comfort.

Beauty and lifestyle-wise, we look at the best sun protection for your hair in Shield, the finest fragrances inspired by sundown hues in A Summer Mood and we speak to Sacha Mitic, co-founder of cult haircare brand SACHAJUAN in Good Hair Game.
We spend time at home with Natalia Shustova, Founder of GOSHÁ in Personal Space and speak to some of the most incredible women we know about how they prep for summer in Next Level Beauty and Sculpt.
Finally, The Wanderlust gives us the go-to guide for Greek island bliss.
Breathe, take stock, rest, restore and refocus this summer. The best is yet to come…
July/August’s – ‘The Summer Escape Issue’ – Download Now
– For more on luxury lifestyle, news, fashion and beauty follow Emirates Woman on Facebook and Instagram
Images: Supplied

Editor’s Letter: An Ode to Pink, from Jaipur with Love

Editor’s Letter: An Ode to Pink, from Jaipur with Love

Vogue Arabia editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut. Photo: Ziga Mihelcic
Pink, not shockingly.
Last March, I visited Jaipur for the first time during Holi, and completely fell in love with the city. I instantly had the idea to put together an issue of Vogue Arabia fully dedicated to pink. From the walls of the iconic City Palace, to which we had special access for this issue through the kind support of Sawai Padmanabh Singh, the Maharaja of Jaipur, to Valentino’s Winter 2022 fuchsia collection that took social media by storm, the color seems to be literally everywhere.
Sawai Padmanabh Singh, the Maharaja of Jaipur. Vogue Arabia July/August 2022. Photo: Nishanth Radhakrishnan
I could not think of a better arena than the ‘Pink City’ itself to stage this blooming extravaganza. Let’s not forget that decades beforeKim Kardashian caused a stir in a shocking pink Balenciaga catsuit, Diana Vreeland so astutely stated that “pink is the navy blue of India.” More than a chromatic exercise, this issue also serves to highlight the strong link between the Gulf countries and India over centuries, initially motivated by trading roots, the two regions have been influencing each other in a creative tango that touches the fields of economy, food, art, architecture, entertainment, and fashion. I hope that as you turn these pages, you feel the same excitement we did putting them together in Jaipur. Pink made us happy, made us dream, and above all, it made us fall in love with fashion again and again.
Read Next: An Ode to Pink and India-Middle East Ties: Inside Vogue Arabia’s July/August 2022 Issue

17 Questions with Maumita, the First Up-and-Coming Indian Model to Front Vogue Arabia’s Cover

17 Questions with Maumita, the First Up-and-Coming Indian Model to Front Vogue Arabia’s Cover

Maumita poses against the Hawa Mahal in Jaipur. Vogue Arabia, July/August 2022. Photo: Nishanth Radhakrishnan
Besides being dedicated to the color pink, the Vogue Arabia July/August 2022 issue also celebrates the strong ties between the Gulf and India that have influenced each others’ food, art, fashion, and much more. And so, featuring on our cover for the first time is an up-and-coming model hailing from the country. Originally from Guwahati in Assam, Maumita is a 21-year-old who is currently pursuing a BA majoring in psychology. Her repertoire so far includes working for some of the much-loved Indian brands, such as Label Ritu Kumar, Fab India, Myntra, and Pink City Prints.

Below, get to know all about Maumita in 17 questions.
How would you describe yourself to someone you just met?
Introvert, great listener, and adventurous.
How and when did you get into modeling?
I have always enjoyed being in front of the camera—whether it’s acting or modeling. When I was a kid, my dad used to take pictures of me and my sister with his film camera. That’s how it started. I am extremely grateful to have been scouted right in my hometown, and then I was guided to get placed with agencies.
What three words best describe your personal style?
Comfortable, timeless, and expressive.
What is the oldest and most cherished item in your closet?
It’s definitely my mom’s mekhela sador from her wedding, which is a traditional Assamese attire. It’s priceless!
Can you share a few highlights of your career with us?
It has to be shooting for Fab India which was one of my biggest campaigns and of course, Vogue Arabia!
Who is your dream designer to work with?
It’s hard to name one but nationally, Sabyasachi Mukherjee and internationally, Casey Cadwallader, Yohji Yamamoto, and Supriya Lele.
What were the best moments of shooting the Vogue Arabia cover?
It was an absolute honor to shoot with the Maharaja of Jaipur. Besides that, getting to wear the most stylish outfits and working with an amazingly talented crew in my beautiful country were a few of the best moments of shooting for Vogue Arabia.
Since our issue is dedicated to pink, how does the color make you feel?
It makes me feel warm because it reminds me of love, bonding, happiness—and Jaipur!
What’s the best thing about being a model?
The best thing about being a model is getting to wear literal pieces of art that take a lot of time and effort to create, meeting super creative people from different cultural backgrounds, and traveling to beautiful places with a beautiful history.
What’s the worst thing about being a model?
The worst thing about being a model is having to stay away from my loved ones and being anxious about missing my flights!
If you could make Jaipur your home, where would you live?
Probably in Hawa Mahal (I wish it was possible). I bet it has a spectacular view!
What makes Vogue Arabia special to you?
Vogue Arabia is empowering and that’s what makes it special to me. Being one of the top Vogue magazines, it lends a voice to Middle Eastern women and also brings cultures together, and creates a platform to showcase the best in fashion.
Tell us one secret from the day you spent shooting with Vogue Arabia in Jaipur.
If I do tell, it won’t remain a secret anymore!
If you could steal one outfit/jewelry piece from the cover shoot, which one would it be?
The purple Elie Saab outfit that was shot in the middle of a huge crowd in a flower market. It was so dramatic, I loved it. Also, I could walk around in those Versace platform pumps forever.
Name one song that reminds you of India.
‘Yeh Jo Des Hai Tera’ by A.R. Rahman. It has a beautiful meaning behind it.
What’s one song that always reminds you of the Middle East?
‘Noor’ by Gobi Desert Collective. I discovered this song a few months ago and it reminds me of the Middle East whenever I listen to it.
What’s one thing you think India and the Middle East have in common? 
The warmth of the people and the colors of their cultures!
Read Next: How the Luxury Design House of Sabyasachi is Bringing India’s Rich Heritage to the World

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com