Fashion

Global fashion, Luxury

Stripe It Up: The New Spring/Summer 2022 Trend That Has Everyone’s Attention

Stripe It Up: The New Spring/Summer 2022 Trend That Has Everyone’s Attention

Brandon Maxwell. Photo: Vogue Runway
Rebellious and emblematic, stripes come with a lot of connotations, but that has never stopped designers from using the classic print. Well known for his explicit and humorous designs, Jean Paul Gautier was one of the first designers to work with the famous blue and white Breton stripes in his sailor-inspired collection during back in the ’90s, and there’s been no looking back since.
This season, fashion decided to shake things up with stripes once again, proving that you can never have too much of a good thing. Scrolling through the spring/summer 2022 collections, we noticed that the famed print was dominating the runway once again. Stripes were the main attraction for several designers, and they didn’t hold back, playing with different colors, textures, and sizes for maximum impact.
Caroline Herrera. Photo: Vogue Runway
Instead of the trademark blue and white, Brandon Maxwell sent thick green and orange stripes out on his runway, while Carolina Herrera switched things up by rendering the lines vertically, keeping her gown simple, yet impactful in a palette of black and white. Likewise, we spotted Balmain nailing the same theme by draping an oversized piece as a summer-ready dress. On the other hand, Saint Laurent decided to go extremely traditional with a basic buttoned-up shirt with front pockets on both sides.
Balmain. Photo: Vogue Runway
This season, Armani also had its go at stripes with a maxi dress in red and blue. Other brands such as Chanel, Christian Siriano and Chloe chose unexpected effects to experiment with the pattern. While Chanel shook basic stripes up and went with zig-zags instead, Chloe presented a fringed multicolored dress and Christian Siriano varied the stripes between horizontal and vertical.
Chanel. Photo: Vogue Runway
There is no limit to what one can do with a striped pattern, and these designers, without a doubt, proved it on the runway. Take a look at some of their coolest renditions from the season.
Chloe. Photo: Vogue Runway

Emporio Armani. Photo: Vogue Runway
Saint Laurent. Photo: Vogue Runway
Christian Siriano. Photo: Vogue Runway

Karen Wazen Becomes the First Middle Eastern To Front a Global Campaign for Roberto Cavalli

Karen Wazen Becomes the First Middle Eastern To Front a Global Campaign for Roberto Cavalli

Karen Wazen. Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli
Influencer and entrepreneur Karen Wazen is officially the first Middle Eastern to be the face of a global Roberto Cavalli campaign. The Lebanese-born, Dubai-based mother-of-three was recently seen in a series of stills for the Italian fashion house. The campaign, which celebrates Roberto Cavalli’s fragrances—the Paradiso perfume, in particular—shows a glowing Wazen dressed in the label’s signature animal print essentials against an equally rustic series of backdrops inspired by wildlife patterns.
All set to be officially unveiled in February, the campaign was reportedly shot in Paris earlier this year. In an official statement, Fausto Puglisi, creative director of Roberto Cavalli, shared, “We are extremely excited to welcome Karen to the Cavalli family. Her liberated spirit and glamorous style embodies the iconic Cavalli universe. We are proud to kickstart our collaboration together with a campaign that celebrates the core Cavalli fragrance pillars, which are the epitome of femininity and bring together a melody of notes inspired by out Italian heritage.” This campaign also marks the first time the fashion house has featured an influencer in its campaign.
Wazen too shared her excitement about the project with her 7.1 million Instagram followers, saying, “This is such a dream for an Arab girl from Lebanon to be the global spokesperson for such an iconic brand… thank you to the most amazing team for this opportunity and for an unforgettable experience.”

In the shots, Wazen gazes at the camera with flawlessly painted cat eyes, while the rest of her beauty look is refreshingly stripped back. Think barely-there base makeup that allows freckles and natural textures to shine through, soft caramel lips, and easy, straight locks. The only indulgent beauty element you’ll spot here is that molten gold manicure, which brings in some of Cavalli’s trademark drama.
Along with being a special moment for the brand, the Roberto Cavalli campaign is another feather in Karen Wazen’s cap, who also launched her very own eyewear brand in 2018, and a game named ‘Karen Wazen: My World’ last year. Scroll to check out more pictures from the campaign!
Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli
Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli
Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli
Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli

Chanel Unveils a Celestial Masterpiece to Celebrate 90 Years Since Coco’s First (and Only) High Jewelry Collection

Chanel Unveils a Celestial Masterpiece to Celebrate 90 Years Since Coco’s First (and Only) High Jewelry Collection

Coco Chanel. Photo: Getty
Today, Chanel unveils a glimpse of its new high jewelry collection for 2022, and it’s one that quite literally reaches for the stars. The centrepiece of the 1932 collection, which celebrates 90 years since Bijoux De Diamants, its founder’s historic and one and only high jewelry collection, is the Allure Céleste. This magnificently modern sapphire and diamond necklace was inspired by the same celestial theme that spurred Gabrielle Chanel’s own creations. “I wanted to cover women in constellations,” said the designer when her collection was unveiled at her private apartment at 29 rue du Faubourg de Saint-Honoré, on November 5, 1932.
The Allure Céleste is the starry centrepiece of the 1932 collection. It can be worn in a number of ways including as a short necklace, three brooches and as a bracelet.
Patrice Leguéreau, director of the Chanel jewelry creation studio today, says he wanted 1932, which will launch fully in May, to pay homage to the audacity and wearability of Coco’s Bijoux de Diamants – which eschewed clasps and fuss in favor of bold, transformable pieces in a palette of diamonds and platinum – and at the same time move the conversation forward. “I wanted to create a different vision of this legacy, by setting these celestial elements in motion,” he explains.
In the Allure Céleste, the movement and light that emanates from the night sky is captured in shimmering halos of diamonds that radiate out from each motif. A crescent moon cradles a 55.55 carat (naturellement, five being Coco’s favorite number), intense blue sapphire, while a comet centres on an 8.02 carat pear-shaped diamond, its fiery tail coming alive in gradated lines of diamonds in assorted cuts.
Coco Chanel pictured here in 1937. Photo: Getty
Coco herself was as renowned for her contradictions as she was for her style and her sharp wit. She once proclaimed she favored costume jewelry over fine jewelry, because she found it “disgraceful to walk around with millions of dollars around your neck, just because you are rich”. Under her direction in the 1920s, costume jewelry became no longer a mere imitation of the “real thing”. She helped establish it as an art form in its own right, whether in commissioning the magnificently opulent Maltese cross cuffs from her friend Duke Fulco di Verdura, or in her elegant tumbles of long pearl necklaces layered over a little black dress.
A shooting star necklace from Chanel’s 1932 Bijoux de Diamants collection.
She was prompted by the Great Depression however to revisit her thoughts around precious jewels. The Wall Street crash of 1929 had a calamitous effect on the entire world, as people and businesses found themselves in ruin. In typically bombastic style, her dislike of ostentation and high-value gems was turned on its head. “This aspect fades in times of financial crisis, when an instinctive need for authenticity in all matters returns, reducing an amusing bauble to its actual worth,” she said in the press kit for the Bijoux de Diamants collection. “If I have chosen diamonds, it is because they represent the greatest value in the smallest volume.”
The cover of Vogue Paris, January 1933, in which the collection was reviewed.
The collection was financed by the London Diamond Corporation, who hoped that Chanel’s creative talents might kickstart renewed energy in the market following several years in the doldrums. Their gamble paid off. Following the two-week exhibition, which was visited by the great and good of the Parisian creative scene, including Pablo Picasso, Gloria Swanson, Condé Nast and star dancers from the Ballets Russes, shares in the company rose and a new buzz around diamonds and precious jewelry was achieved. As Coco herself said, “Nothing could be better for forgetting the crisis than feasting one’s eyes on beautiful new things, which the skills of our craftsmen and women never cease to unveil.”
In customary fearless style, Chanel chose to display her creations on wax busts rather than on jewelers’ trays. With the help of friends including artist Paul Iribe, who designed the jewelry, the poet Jean Cocteau who wrote the collection manifesto, and Robert Bresson (later a celebrated film director), who photographed it, she created a unique collection that above all was focused on the female body and how jewelry should work to enhance it, not hinder it. “In a world that was deeply masculine, Gabrielle Chanel was a woman who designed for women. In her view jewelry should be an idea, not a status symbol of the men who bought it for the women in their lives,” says Marianne Etchebarne, Chanel’s global head of watches and fine jewelry product marketing, clients, and communication.
Robert Bresson’s images of the Bijoux de Diamants exhibition appeared in Vogue Paris, January 1933.
Just as she created fashion that offered women new freedom and flexibility in their clothes, a star brooch could be worn in the hair or on a lapel. A comet caressed the neck, its tail of diamonds flattering the wearer’s décolletage. She focused on the motifs that made up her world, from supple couture ribbons of diamonds to the mosaic floors of the Aubazine abbey where she was raised that detailed the sun, the moon and five-point stars.  “It caused a sensation at the time and still today it remains the cornerstone of our jewelry designs,” says Etchebarne.
“My stars! How could anything be more becoming or more eternally modern?” Gabrielle Chanel.
But the collection was not without controversy. Paris’s traditional jewelry houses were outraged that a mere couturière — a dressmaker —  and a woman to boot, had been tasked with creating a high jewelry collection in the hope of reinvigorating the diamond market, and they demanded that the corporation close the project down. The corporation persisted but its plans to bring Bijoux de Diamants to London never materialized, and most of the pieces were broken up, never to be seen again. Little did those Parisian jewelers know that the collection’s legacy – and Coco’s vision – would live on, and still be inspiring the world today.
Read Next: 9 Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel Quotes to Live By
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Nemer Saade’s Latest Collection is an 80s-Inspired Celebration of Togetherness

Nemer Saade’s Latest Collection is an 80s-Inspired Celebration of Togetherness

Photo: Nader Moussally
As we move ahead with the new normal, nostalgia for the decades gone by remains strong, and any chance to honor that time must not be missed. Lebanese designer Nemer Saade is of the same mind, as he harkens back to the joyful 80s for the latest collection of his eponymous brand.
The strong silhouettes and bold fabrics synonymous with the era collide in Nemer Saade FW22, bursting with color while being rooted in elegance. Pieces form the designer’s response to a fast-paced post-isolation time, where togetherness is celebrated as a way of slowing down and taking stock of life. To that end, the femininity and masculinity in the designs of both genders are dialed up, sometimes blurring the line between the two in a “homage to the fun and combative spirit of men and women.” Think, a grey leather jacket for women, and a hot pink suit for men, with both equally capable of sparking confidence within the wearer.
The collection’s color palette features neutrals like beige, cream, and grey with pops of purple, yellow, and blue. The designer also taps the winning color combination of bright pink and red, offering it in the form of a suit that can take you from day to night. A desert-colored cashmere wool coat is the highlight in the women’s collection, featuring Swarovski crystal-encrusted embroidery on the sleeves.
The Beirut-based label has been worn by many regional stars including singer Ragheb Alama, actor Nadine Nassib Njeim, and more recently, Nadine Labaki. The Lebanese actor-director wore a black suit by the designer to the Dubai premiere of her new Netflix film, Perfect Strangers.
Take a look at some of the key pieces from the collection below.
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Read Next: Mona Zaki Wore a Romantic Black Velvet Gown by an Arab Designer for the Premiere of Netflix’s Perfect Strangers

Bella Hadid Accessorized Her Backless Brown Dress With a Custom ‘Palestine’ Necklace

Bella Hadid Accessorized Her Backless Brown Dress With a Custom ‘Palestine’ Necklace

Photo: Instagram.com/chvkerjewelry
As a model who frequently champions her Palestinian heritage, it’s natural that Bella Hadid does so sartorially too. The part-Arab daughter of real estate developer Mohamed Hadid, known for actively advocating her support for Palestine, was recently spotted wearing its name around her neck. While out in West Hollywood with her brother Anwar Hadid, and friends including Euphoria star Alexa Demie, the model accessorized her look with gold necklaces that read ‘Palestine’, and her full name, ‘Isabella’.

These are not just necklaces bought off-the-shelf, but custom pieces created on Hadid’s request by Chvker Jewelry’s designer Nazlia Yunus. She revealed that Hadid commissioned her to design around eight bespoke nameplate necklaces in gold, reading:  ‘Pizza Queen’, ‘Libra Angel’, ‘Hellz Bellz’, ‘Baby Bellz’, ‘Bella Hadid’, and her middle name, ‘Khair’. Chvker Jewelry is known for its trendy Y2K pieces, in line with the 25-year-old model’s current style. In fact, Hadid is not the only popular name the brand has found a fan in. Yunus’ designs have also been spotted on Demie, beauty mogul Kylie Jenner, Stranger Things actor Millie Bobby Brown, and rapper Becky G.

Hadid complemented her necklaces with a pair of classic oversized golden hoops. Her outfit of choice for attending artist Alana O’Herlihy’s birthday at The Nice Guy restaurant consisted of a brown backless halter dress with a plunging neckline and a high-low neckline, and white knee-high leather boots. She completed her look with a leopard print purse slung over her shoulder, and wore her hair in a messy bun with a side fringe, which has fast become her signature hairstyle.
Read Next: Bella Hadid’s Love for Palestine Has Now Been Preserved Through This Painting

Balenciaga’s Demna Opens Up About Facing Discrimination at a Paris Restaurant Because of His Clothing

Balenciaga’s Demna Opens Up About Facing Discrimination at a Paris Restaurant Because of His Clothing

Demna-Balenciaga-featured
Creative director of Balenciaga and co-founder of Vetements, Demna, has never shied away from speaking his mind on his social media platform. After all, it’s honesty that creates a sense of community online, isn’t it? If you follow the designer’s Instagram handle, @demnagram, you may already be familiar with his daily musings, which touch upon his most candid thoughts, from the reason he hates the word ‘glamour’ to what ‘couture’ really means to him.
Demna’s latest post touches upon discrimination, and the designer highlighted the issue with a personal story that took place recently, where he was denied entry into a Paris restaurant on account of his attire. “People are sometimes scared of my look, my silhouette. They judge me on that because they’re not able to categorize me,” Demna shared in a post yesterday. Speaking about the spot he was trying to enter for a meal, he shared, “I never really go to those ‘chic’ places – I mostly cook at home – and they didn’t want to let me in because of the way I was dressed. They were like, ‘Chez nous, c’est pas possible!’ I was like [incredulous], ‘Pardon?’ I was wearing Head-to-toe Balenciaga! Had the other person I was with not said, ‘It’s OK; he’s with us’, they wouldn’t have let me in.”
Musing about the episode, Demna also spoke about often feeling like the odd one out, and how he plans to use his talents in the fashion field to help others like him change this narrative. “That’s the story of my life – I don’t fit in. People who go to ‘chic’ places like that don’t have the freedom to look the way they want and I think my career will always be dedicated to proving the opposite.” Because at the end of the day, each of us should have the free will to dress as we please, regardless of labels and social standing. “Unless they know who I am – Demna, creative director at Balenciaga – they won’t let me in. But the moment they know that, the way I choose to look suddenly becomes acceptable. That’s what’s so unfair. I hate that, and I don’t want to be a part of it. I’ll never be hungry enough to have to wear a tuxedo to eat. I’d be happier going to McDonalds wearing my rubber boots. That is my aspirational lifestyle – just to be who I am.”

André Leon Talley Has Passed Away at 73

André Leon Talley Has Passed Away at 73

André Leon Talley at an event in New York in 2020. Photo: Getty
Fashion icon André Leon Talley has died at the age of 73. According to reports, the fashion writer and former Vogue creative director was in the hospital due to an undisclosed illness.
Upon the news of his demise going public, several noteworthy names from the fashion industry were quick to share heartbreaking reactions of online. Among them was designer Diane von Furstenberg, model Amber Valletta and Coco Rocha.
After years at Vogue, where he became Anna Wintour‘s right hand, André Leon Talley joined the W Magazine family in Paris in 1995. His relationship with Vogue, however, was a special one, and drew him back in 1998 in the position of the magazine’s editor-at-large, which he maintained for the next five years. Over the years, Talley’s eye and understanding of fashion made him a name to follow across the world, and his mark on the industry will remain for generations. Below, a look at some of the messages shared in response to the news of his death.

WWDownload: Hermès Brings NFT Lawsuit

WWDownload: Hermès Brings NFT Lawsuit

There’s nowhere Hermès won’t go to defend its signature Birkin bag — including the virtual world.The French luxury brand filed suit in a New York federal court on Friday against Mason Rothschild, creator of MetaBirkins NFTs, to allege trademark infringement and dilution. The digital collection featured 100 virtual bags resembling furry versions of Hermès’ signature bag.
The complaint, submitted to New York’s Southern District Court, described Rothschild as “a digital speculator” with a get-rich-quick scheme to “rip off Hermès’ famous Birkin trademark by adding the generic prefix ‘meta.’”
Hermès is not the first to sue over NFTs. A May 2021 lawsuit against Dapper Labs alleged that sales on its NBA Top Shot platform violated securities laws. Miramax accused Quentin Tarantino of breaking copyright in November 2021, in a legal tussle over “Pulp Fiction” NFTs that the filmmaker ultimately ignored on Monday, when he released the first of several chapters.

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But as the first major luxury fashion house to tie NFTs to trademark infringement, the maison could deliver a landmark case for the industry.
The MetaBirkins creator responded to the lawsuit via Instagram on Monday, arguing that his collection amounts to art. “I am not creating or selling fake Birkin bags,” he wrote. “I’ve made art works that depict imaginary, fur-covered Birkin bags.
“My lawyers at Lex Lumina PLLC put it well when they said that the First Amendment gives me the right to make and sell art that depicts Birkin bags, just as it gave Andy Warhol the right to make and sell art depicting Campbell’s soup cans.”
New York-based Lex Lumina does not yet have a track record to speak of, since it just launched last fall as a boutique firm specializing in intellectual property. Cofounder Chris Sprigman, a New York University professor, author and attorney, has deep experience in intellectual property law, antitrust and comparative constitutional law and has appeared in the media to discuss issues like fashion law or technology and creative commerce.
It’s not clear when Rothschild hired the firm, but the need looked apparent when the fashion house issued a cease-and-desist letter on Dec. 16. At the time, Hermès also notified OpenSea, the NFT platform that offered the collection.
Earlier reports indicated that the marketplace pulled the items, although WWD spotted listings under the MetaBirkins name briefly on Monday. They were taken down later that afternoon. According to the filing, Rothschild ironically complained about “counterfeit” MetaBirkins, so the listings could have been posted by someone else.
In the real world, genuine Birkin bags can run anywhere from $9,000 to $500,000, and resellers like The RealReal saw interest grow during the pandemic, particularly among Millennials.
The demand apparently translates to virtual goods — or, if Rothschild’s argument has any merit, digital art. In December, he sold his first MetaBirkin for 10 Ethereum, the equivalent of more than $40,000, and moved some 600,000 NFTs in five days. This followed a previous Baby Birkin NFT sale in May, which sold for 5.5 Ethereum, roughly more than $23,000. Then it resold to a collector for $42,000.

The current collection may be stymied, but not blocked. According to Metabirkin.com, sales remain active on alternate sites Rarible, Zora and LooksRare.

WWD spotted MetaBirkins listed on OpenSea on Monday, but the listings were pulled down before the seller could be verified.
Screen capture/WWD

For a brief time, it seemed that negotiation might be possible, at least according to Rothschild. “We told them that we believed that the dispute could be resolved through an informal conversation between me and an Hermès representative. Hermès chose instead to break off negotiations and sue me,” he added on Instagram.
But the company could be less worried about what he’s already done than what he does next.
In the filing, Hermès wrote, “He encourages others to create ‘MetaBirkins’ with his ‘Build-a-MetaBirkin’ contest, which further damages and dilutes the Birkin Mark. He has announced to his followers his plans to develop his own ‘decentralized NF exchange’ under the MetaBirkins brand.”
Essentially, it believes he’s trying to build a whole marketplace, exchange and community. It also doesn’t buy his “artistic license” rationale. The complaint distinguishes between exercising artistic creativity and using a trademark “in a manner calculated to mislead consumers.…He is stealing the goodwill in Hermès’ famous intellectual property to create and sell his own line of products.”
Debates over artistic license and trademarks have raged for years, both online and offline. Now it’s heading to the virtual world via exclusive digital fashion, which is untested territory.
The value in these types of NFTs lies in their ability to prove their own authenticity and ownership. Interest exploded last year across art, fashion and other categories, drawing millions for high-profile transactions. But the law hasn’t kept pace — even though ongoing demand for NFTs, intensifying hype and a rush of corporate and independent efforts look poised to drive a wave of lawsuits.
The gold rush around digital fashion may be underway, but this iteration is still in its infancy. From here, signs point to NFTs maturing in the metaverse. After all, if everyone will spend time in that new form of immersive internet, it’s not a stretch to believe they’ll want to dress their avatars or show off their virtual trophies. This is one way NFTs are expected to fuel metaversal commerce. At least eventually.

It’s worth noting that the sprawling metaverse envisioned by companies like Facebook’s Meta doesn’t exist yet. Someday, a massive, hyper-connected virtual 3D environment may come, but it’s likely 10 years away, if it arrives at all. Until then, the landscape remains a disjointed patchwork of separate platforms.
Fashion has been adapting to or even embracing the chaos. Brands have been striking partnerships with platforms like Roblox, Fortnite, Zepeto and others, while making long-term plans. Nike filed trademarks for “use online and in virtual worlds” in November, and others are weighing similar moves. Some companies have even launched entire metaverse-focused divisions, like Balenciaga and Diesel owner OTB Group, and many more have launched NFTs or will soon.
Hermès sees Rothschild’s effort as driven by metaverse ambitions, starting principally with the name and its widespread use on social media and e-commerce. The company believes he’s trying to replicate the Birkin bag’s real-world success and using the “MetaBirkins to brand all of his ‘metaverse’ business activities.”
Its confidence in filing the lawsuit is understandable. For years, the company has put up a ferocious and often successful defense of its products. In 2008, a judge sided with the luxury fashion company over eBay, finding that the site didn’t do enough to block sales of fakes on its platform. Last year, a Paris court convicted 23 counterfeiters with prison time and damages worth 10.4 million euros, or nearly $12 million.
In between, a 2012 ruling handed Hermès a major victory against 34 websites for peddling phony Birkins, Kelly bags and other items and granted $100 million in damages. But the company doesn’t always win. The same year, it also fought and lost a trademark battle in China.
Hermès now argues that its existing rights should cover the virtual world, or metaverse, as well. It remains to be seen if a judge will agree. There’s some legal debate over the issue, especially if the brand doesn’t actually do business there. But if the company prevails, it stands to collect damages, including all MetaBirkins profit, and end Rothschild’s use of the Birkin name or likeness as part of any products or services without express authorization.

But whether it wins or loses, the case may help define fashion’s claim in the digital future.

The 15 Foundational Pieces Every Wardrobe Should Have

The 15 Foundational Pieces Every Wardrobe Should Have

Nora Attal’s self-portrait for Vogue Arabia
Building an excellent wardrobe takes time and patience. Looking at what you have – and what you might be missing – is a good place to start (refer to Vogue’s step-by-step wardrobe detox guide for tips).
However, there are certain timeless staples that the Vogue editors swear by. Let’s start with the basics: white T-shirts are team Vogue’s MVP. Find a style that fits just right, focusing on the hemline and sleeve lengths. Excellent shirting, too, is a necessity. Pair with trousers, a blazer and loafers – other clothing essentials – for smart occasions, or jeans and trainers for more casual moments.
Outerwear-wise, you can’t go wrong with a trench coat. Twists on the classic silhouette from Kassl Editions and Another Tomorrow are worth the investment. As for bags? Opt for a sturdy tote that’s roomy enough to hold all of your personals.
Here, Vogue’s guide to the clothing essentials that will serve you all year round.

The white T-shirt
Heavy-weight T-shirt
Cotton-jersey T-shirt

“I’m forever looking for the perfect white T-shirt because I pretty much wear one every day,” remarks British Vogue’s global content lead and European deputy editor Sarah Harris. Follow her lead with our pick of the best styles.
Hard-working jeans
501 Levi’s original jeans
Buy NowDistressed high-rise straight-leg jeans
Buy NowChamomile organic cropped high-rise tapered jeans
Buy Now
Finding the perfect jeans is no mean feat, but great ones will last you a lifetime.
An oversized blazer
Fitted essential suit jacket
Buy NowTristan double-breasted twill blazer
Buy Now
When done right, louche tailoring can be exquisitely chic. Our tip? Ensure the oversized fit doesn’t swamp you.
The trench coat
Trench coat in double-face wool-cashmere
Buy NowOrganic cotton-blend trench coat
Buy Now
There’s a reason why trench coats have stood the test of time. Easy to throw on, they instantly pull a look together.
Hoop earrings
Detailed twisted gold hoop earrings
Buy NowHinged 18kt gold-vermeil hoop earrings
Buy Now
No jewelry box is complete without a great pair of hoops.
The do-it-all tote bag
Japanese debossed-logo tote bag
Buy NowAgele coated canvas tote bag
Buy Now
Tote bags are an accessory that you can trust. These roomy styles will fit anything and everything.
Smart loafers
Leather lug sole Horsebit loafer
Buy NowChocolate brushed leather loafers
Buy Now
Facing a footwear conundrum? Loafers are your answer.
The roll-neck
Uniqlo +J middle gauge cashmere blend jumper
Buy NowRecycled-cashmere blend roll-neck sweater
Buy Now
Roll-necks are the ultimate layering piece. Pair with a thermal for extra warmth on chilly days.
The maxi skirt
High-waist split-hem woven midi skirt
Buy NowFront-slit felted-wool maxi skirt
Buy Now
Mini skirts were a key trend for SS22, but maxi skirts will always be in style. Pair with boots and a coat for winter, and sandals with a tucked-in T-shirt or tank top for summer.
The slip dress
Provence open-back lace-trimmed silk-satin midi dress
Buy NowThin-strap silk crepe de Chine slip dress
Buy Now
An effortless option for an evening soirée, slip dresses can be made work-appropriate with a snug knit.
Tailored trousers
Corette wool-twill straight-leg pants
Buy Now
Tailored trousers are a failsafe office essential. If off-the-rail styles don’t fit quite right, visit a tailor to make tweakments.
Trendy trainers

Almost any outfit can be dressed down with a pair of trainers. New Balance 990s are the ultimate “Dad” trainer among the It-girls, while coveted Nike Dunks and Jordans will add pizazz.
The white shirt
Men extra fine cotton broadcloth regular fit shirt
Buy NowOrganic cotton poplin shirt
Buy NowOversized cotton-poplin shirt
Buy Now
Never underestimate the quiet power of a white shirt. Be it clean and crisp poplin or breezy linen, there’s one for every situation.
Wide-leg trousers
Pleated merino-twill wide-leg trousers
Buy NowIgor pleated silk and cashmere-blend wide-leg pants
Buy Now
Breeze your way through 2022 in a flowing pair of wide-leg trousers. If a hemline is too long, get it altered (or alter it yourself).
Black leggings
High-rise zipped-cuff leggings
Buy NowWoolworth stretch-ponte leggings
Buy Now
No longer reserved for gym outings, let black leggings be your style companion in 2022.
Read Next: 20 Conscious Buys to Kickstart a More Mindful 2022
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Jennifer Lopez Is Bringing Back The Boho Denim Maxi Skirt

Jennifer Lopez Is Bringing Back The Boho Denim Maxi Skirt

Photo: Getty
“Boho chic” is a divisive phrase. To some, it conjures up low-slung harem pants worn with coin belts and tie-dye peasant blouses – the kind that give even the most forgiving fashion fans the ick. For others, it spells out the style of Sienna Miller, the Olsen twins, and Kate Moss. But now, one of the trend’s key pieces – the maxi skirt – is making a comeback on an unlikely source: Jennifer Lopez.
Spotted on the streets of Los Angeles this weekend, the 52-year-old pop superstar wore a boho-inspired Dior patchwork denim full-length skirt, a cream knitted roll-neck jumper, and a brown pair of distressed cowboy boots by Ralph Lauren. The look was topped off with a set of gold hoop earrings by Jennifer Fisher, brown Max Mara Geometric sunglasses, and a leather fringe Hobo bag from Chanel’s pre-fall 2014 Metiers D’art Paris-Dallas collection.
Later on, JLo waved the flag for the throwback style in yet another skirt, but this time, a more demure button-up style. The singer paired the piece with a black polo-neck, a forest green Gucci logo belt, and Alaïa velvet platform Hiker boots. Does this confirm that boho maxi skirts are back? Only time will tell, but Lopez certainly looks striking.
Read Next: Jennifer Lopez’s Stylists Reveal What It’s Really Like To Dress the Star
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

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