Fashion

Global fashion, Luxury

Zanini RTW Spring 2022

Zanini RTW Spring 2022

Marco Zanini has a profound knowledge of the fashion industry and he is fully aware that to grow his Zanini line, presenting its sixth collection this September, he needs financial support. “It’s definitely time to find a partner,” said the designer, while showing his spring 2022 lineup, as sophisticated and chic as usual.
The look: Zanini updated his signature sober and discreet elegance with more playful touches. Upscale natural fabrics with textures continued to take center stage in this refined lineup for women who want to look impeccable and unique, including during their spare time.

Quote of note: “The process here is very different, it’s about trying to really understand the needs of my clients and my final consumers. It’s not about the bold look for the catwalk, it’s about the small details that make each piece appealing for women living a real life.”
Key pieces: A cotton and silk shirt, printed with a hand-drawn motif of straw baskets, tucked into linen pleated short pants; a relaxed striped suit featuring baggy pants with a drawstring waist; a feminine, flared shirtdress decorated with a floral pattern, and a navy blue jumpsuit blending sartorial details with workwear.

Takeaway: In today’s market, that is becoming more and more challenging for niche brands, Zanini has certainly all the right credentials to succeed at growing in an organic way, without loosing its signature exclusivity.

Versace RTW Spring 2022

Versace RTW Spring 2022

Celebrities and supermodels, prints and crystal mesh, foulards and safety pins — and a a big dose of fun. All the ingredients of the signature explosive Versace formula were there on Friday night when the fashion house returned to the physical format with a flamboyant show.To the tune of her retro pop hit “Physical,” British music star Dua Lipa, the face of Versace’s fall 2021 advertising campaign, made her catwalk debut walking the runway twice: she opened the show in a black skirt suit with slits kept closed by multicolor safety pins and she closed it — and took the final bow with Versace — in a hot pink crystal mesh set.

She was not the only notable on the runway. Along with the most-requested models, Gigi Hadid included, the cast featured Emily Ratajkowski; Naomi Campbell, – her statuesque beauty exalted by a mannish suit in a bold pink tone – and Madonna’s daughter Lourdes Leon Ciccone, wrapped in a silver crystal mesh gown.

On the catwalk, which featured a roof created with silk foulards that were waved by shirtless perfectly abbed models rhythmically pulling black ropes, Versace unveiled a rich, big co-ed collection true to the brand’s heritage.

The brand’s iconic safety pins made a playful comeback in brightly colored variations that peppered several black dresses and separates with slits, vertical cuts and cut outs. Foulards stole the spotlight. Splashed with vibrant patterns, they were not only used as accessories but became an integral part of the pieces, for example as inserts in a denim mini frock, peeping out from the edges of a sexy vinyl bustier dress or from the waist of a pair of classic fluid pants in a deep burgundy tone paired with a matching coat and a logo T-shirt.

“The foulard is a fundamental component of Versace’s heritage and character. It’s acted as a canvas for our iconic prints and is worn in multiple ways from knotted tops to headscarves to bag accessories, it’s a way of adding Versace attitude to any look,” said  Versace chief creative officer Donatella Versace. “The foulard has been with us since the very beginning of the brand, but this season turns everything on its head, it is no longer fluid or dreamy, the scarf is provocative, sexy, wound tight.”

Vivid colors, from sorbet shades to neon hues, added an energetic boost to the show’s flamboyant vibe, underscored by maxi floral and geometric patterns, as well as logos – especially on the men’s pieces, which had a varsity, sporty vibe, or on the knit sweaters and vests enriched with an intarsia Versace crest.

There was lots going on here, but the joyous collection, which included a lineup of unapologetically sensual evening options, was a strategically studied and commercially savvy take on Versace’s iconic exuberance that  should keep its parent Capri Holdings happy.

Sportmax RTW Spring 2022

Sportmax RTW Spring 2022

In the Max Mara system, Sportmax is definitely the edgier, more experimental brand. With this spring collection, the label confirmed this role, unveiling a cool collection that offered new interpretations of the Sportmax stylistic codes.
Inspired by the dichotomy between “order and chaos, light and obscurity,” as highlighted in the show’s notes, fashion director Grazia Malagoli delivered a charming lineup focused on contrasts. In particular, this season the brand’s signature urban minimalism was paired with baroque, opulent elements for an interesting clash: streamlined pants, second-skin knitted overalls, elongated blazers and baggy pants with a ’90s vibe were juxtaposed with gathered and draped ethereal dresses, crafted from gauze, silk georgette and tulle.

Corsetry elements, including laced-up details and exposed bras, stressed the feminine attitude of some of the looks, while an athletic, almost adventurous vibe, was introduced in the lineup via parachute-like straps and tone-on-tone maxi backpacks — the survival bags of Sportmax girls.
The soundtrack, composed by Teho Teardo specifically for the show using his signature microscope sounds, enhanced the overall feeling of being suspended in time in the bright dawn of a new world — a happy one for the Sportmax brand.

MM6 Maison Margiela RTW Spring 2022

MM6 Maison Margiela RTW Spring 2022

Ah, the simple pleasure of sitting on a café terrace for an aperitivo. The MM6 Maison Margiela team left boxed snacks, including pickled onions in a jar painted white, offered beer and gin cocktails and then served up a compact, quirky collection of white suiting and black dresses with extra sleeves here and there; warped chessboard prints galore, and a hilarious faux-fur roller suitcase in collaboration with Eastpak.
The look: Power suits, soigné evening gowns and rugged streetwear with a surrealist bent, all the way through to clownish, checkerboard printed ensembles with neck ruffs. Surrrealist female artists Claude Cahun, Leonora Carrington and Dorothea Tanning were among the muses for the design team.

Quote of note: “Sleeves and gloves become key vehicles for the collection’s surreal undertones, protruding from trouser waistbands, bag handles and even the back panels of a leather jacket, and traces of the making process are felt in a kraft paper bustier and an intricately pleated calico ruff skirt.”
Key pieces: Black evening columns made of elegantly sagging lining fabric; and taut biker jackets with extra sleeves hugging the waist.
Takeaway: If you’re plotting a “The Queen’s Gambit” party or binge rewatch, you’ll be spoiled for choice for chessboard-patterned clothes.

GCDS RTW Spring 2022

GCDS RTW Spring 2022

Giuliano Calza’s beachy bright collection — full of raffia, jangly jewelry and hand crochet — was a salute to summer and a post-lockdown life. This unisex collection had it all — soft and sun-bleached denim, manga comic references, slinky eveningwear with hidden logos and a sustainability angle, too.It all hung together in a surreal film written and directed by Calza that took viewers to the desert, and to an underwater jellyfish world. During a walk-through of this upbeat collection, Calza, whose title is creative director, said he wanted it to be “comfy, easy — and precious, too. I designed it knowing it would be the first collection to hit the beach post-pandemic.”

There was lots of flashiness and fun in the form of a tailored jacket paved with pink crystals, courtesy of the Czech company Preciosa, and a long, screaming yellow sunhat-slash-cape with a melting popsicle design, a nod to the late Franco Moschino.

Little crochet pirate heads were stitched together to form a minidress, a long fringed skirt and a tank top, all of them studded with fat faux emeralds. The designs were inspired by a characters in “One Piece,” the Japanese animated series produced by Toei Animation. 

Calza, who sold a majority stake in GCDS earlier this year to the Made in Italy Fund, which looks to promote small and medium-sized brands, is also taking an eco-turn, introducing a new “green label” for spring, filled with clothing and accessories made with sustainable or upcycled denim and jersey.
There were also chunky clogs that looked as if they were made of rubber, but instead were fashioned from recycled and compostable materials. The designer will be showcasing the new green label at Selfridges in the coming months. 
Despite all the flash and green flourish, there was one thing missing here — the in-your-face logo. Calza’s a pro at reading the industry tea leaves, and believes now is not the time for bold statements.
Instead, he sneaked the GCDS letters into the chunky chains on hobo bags, traced them lightly onto a long, black sequin dress and the buttons of a shirt — a cool act of subversion.

Tod’s RTW Spring 2022

Tod’s RTW Spring 2022

Tod’s creative director Walter Chiapponi admitted he may never turn his back on the bon-ton aesthetics he feels is so ingrained in his style – and that is so personal, as it always reminds him of his childhood and his mother. However, for spring the designer wanted to add a tomboyish streak to his designs.
He introduced a strong knitwear component for the first time, with short patchwork dresses or crochet tops with nubby fringes derived from the art of carpet-making. The knits contributed to the comfort factor that is a key trend in Milan.

Skirts were all short, sometimes with raw edges, and Chiapponi kept the cocktail silhouette simple, as in A-line coats.
A ‘60s vibe ran throughout the collection as Chiapponi ticked off Federico Fellini, Anna Magnani and Isabella Rossellini photographed by Robert Mapplethorpe, as well as films such as “La Dolce Vita,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” “ Valley of the Dolls,” and “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” as inspirations – cue the pretty bucket hats. At the same time, models walked in front of photos of artist Carlota Guerrero’s installation at the PAC contemporary art museum – a reminder that Chiapponi is designing for today’s “multifaceted woman,” he noted.

Several looks hinged on details that emphasized Tod’s core material – leather. For example, large pockets in dark calf stood out in contrast on a sand-colored, sleeveless shirt jacket. Chiapponi also combined leather and linen, which gave a short dress a modern and new texture- almost shiny.
The designer also worked with nylon, on colorful, puckered windbreakers for a sportier look.
Chiapponi obviously paid great attention to Tod’s bread-and-butter –  shoes and bags – emphasizing the T signature logo and the pebble motif. Sandals were offered with macro rubber soles – although at times they looked too clunky –  but there were also daintier kitten-heeled pointy shoes.
Small bowling bags embellished with the pebble pattern were jazzed up by vivid yellow, turquoise and bright red hues.

Charles Jeffrey Loverboy RTW Spring 2022

Charles Jeffrey Loverboy RTW Spring 2022

London Fashion Week’s most subversive — and cavalier — fashion showman, Charles Jeffrey kept the fashion pack hostage for nearly 75 minutes on Monday night to view his two-part spring event. London Mayor Sadiq Khan stood crammed behind a laser-beam fence with the sweaty, maskless fashion pack and assorted nightlife creatures to witness the spectacle in a grubby, airless nightclub.The look: Part one by Bradley Sharpe: An attempt at ’60s-era Balenciaga couture, in white fabrics resembling paper, and black ones that looked like trash bags. Part two by Jeffrey: The usual loud and zany clothes for party people who burn the candle at both ends, literally. Some even wore candles on their heads, yielding a creepy cap of melted wax.
Quote of note: “Approved attire includes the following…,” dictated the show’s “Rules of Entry.” The rules listed pretty much everything seen either in the audience, or on the runway: “Ceremonial garb, suede shoes, monocles, cowls, cheap wigs, shirts unbuttoned to the navel, handkerchiefs, studs, tunics, shrouds, over plucked eyebrows, green or lavender garments, wing collars, work boots, cocked hats, sleeveless undershirts, earrings, gowns, peroxide blonde hair, stars painted upon the brow, mantles, red neckties, tin foil bonnets, fresh blooms, heavy jewelry, sashes, sleeves rolled up to the armpits, black leather, high drag, scents of jasmine, camphor and frankincense.”

Key items: Lacquered and ruffled tartan capes and skirts, knit hats with floppy bunny ears, or some statement hair sculpture.
Takeaway: Charles Jeffrey is London’s torchbearer for expressive, excessive party clothes and streetwear, and arguably the season’s most indulgent young talent.

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Studio 54-Inspired SS22 Show

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Studio 54-Inspired SS22 Show

Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
For his first live show since joining Fendi, artistic director Kim Jones was inspired by the late Puerto Rican fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez, and the spirit of Studio 54. Here, fashion critic Anders Christian Madsen breaks down the five key takeaways from the spring/summer 2022 collection.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
It was Kim Jones’s first Fendi show with a live audience
For Kim Jones, who joined Fendi as artistic director between the two lockdowns, and had to present his first collections to a digital audience, his sophomore ready-to-wear show was a special occasion. “This is my first live show for Fendi, and it’s a celebration. Our woman has let loose a bit – she’s going out, dressing up. We’ve all been locked away for so long that I think that’s what we all need right now,” he said.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
It was inspired by Antonio Lopez
Jones found in the Fendi archives a logo hand-sketched by the late Puerto Rican fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez, whose work was defined by the spirits of the 1960s and ’70s. A friend of Karl Lagerfeld – Jones’s predecessor at Fendi – Lopez embodied the decadence and glamour of New York City in the ’70s, and frequented Studio 54, which became the imagined surroundings of Jones’s collection.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Pieces were imbued with Lopez’s sketches
“Lopez was a friend of Karl’s, and has always been someone who inspired me. He was forward thinking; inclusive; looked up to by everyone from Andy Warhol to Steven Meisel and David Hockney. I wanted to introduce him to a new generation,” Jones said. He applied the illustrator’s work to kaftans and shirts, transformed them in intarsia leathers and jacquards, and interpreted them in handbags and hairclips.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
It was post-pandemic power suiting
More than anything, the collection felt devoted to suiting: a kind of tailoring so empowering and glamorous it had left the territory of office-wear and entered the evening realm. If post-pandemic appetites call for a “dressed” approach to fashion, but aren’t quite ready for a cocktail dress, this was the happy medium (although Jones had a few cocktail options up his sleeve as well).
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Fendi is for everyone
“My Fendi is multi-generational. It’s for all different kinds of women – anyone who wants to feel good about themselves. The Lopez woman, and the Fendi woman, is empowered; she’s someone of her own making,” Jones said, drawing a parallel between the diverse stars of the Studio 54 dance floor and the customer base he is creating at Fendi.
Read Next: “Connecting the past with the present,” Kim Jones on His Second Couture Collection for Fendi
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

How Tiffany & Co.’s Timeless Pieces are Furthering its Legacy of Women Empowerment

How Tiffany & Co.’s Timeless Pieces are Furthering its Legacy of Women Empowerment

Already an icon in jewelry design, Tiffany & Co. furthers its legacy of female empowerment and sustainability with breath-taking collections that honor its exquisite gems – as well as the women who wear them.
Suhilah (top left) wears Tiffany HardWear necklace, Tiffany T True bracelet, Tiffany T1 bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond ring, Tiffany T1 ring, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Noura (left) wears left hand Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds right hand Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings; dress, Abadia. Afaf (middle left) wears Tiffany HardWear necklace, Tiffany T diamond bangle, Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Sara (middle right) wears Tiffany T1 pendant necklace with diamonds, Tiffany Victoria® Vine ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond ring, Tiffany Victoria® earrings with diamonds; dress, Self-Portrait at Rubaiyat; pants, Abadia. Aisha (right) wears right hand Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany HardWear bracelet with diamonds left hand Tiffany T T1 ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
When thinking of Tiffany & Co., it’s not difficult to conjure images of a blue box, sparkling diamonds, and Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Since its establishment in 1931 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, the American high jewelry brand has come to be synonymous with quality material and novel design.
However, alongside this feat, the house is known to champion women’s empowerment and sustainability. In 2017, the jeweler reinforced its commitment to women’s rights, human rights, diversity, and inclusion by signing on to the United Nations Women’s Empowerment Principles, and continues to invest in programs to advance gender equality. It also remains committed to protecting the planet, setting for itself major sustainability goals for 2025, which prioritize transparency, appropriate waste recycling and land management, water stewardship, and the well-being of its workers. To celebrate the luxury heritage house’s legacy, Vogue Arabia brought together London-based Saudi entrepreneur Aisha Almamy and her sisters Afaf, Suhilah, Noura, and Sara, to present Tiffany & Co.’s most timeless pieces in the September 2021 issue.
Noura (left) wears left hand Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds right hand Tiffany Victoria Vine ring with diamonds; Tiffany Victoria earrings with diamonds. Aisha (middle) wears right hand Tiffany Victoria® ring with diamonds, Tiffany Victoria® Vine ring with diamonds left hand Tiffany Victoria® ring with diamonds; dress, 16Arlington from Rubaiyat. Sara (right) wears Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Lynn earrings with diamonds; dress, Self-Portrait at Rubaiyat. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
A reinvention of the classic Tiffany T collection, the Tiffany T1 expands on the iconic motif that John Loring, the company’s design emeritus, introduced in the early 1980s. Gasconading 18ct rose gold bracelets and rings in wide and narrow widths set with pavé diamonds in a honeycomb pattern, everything from the T1 hinged bangle to the circle pendant aims to represent strength and self-empowerment.
Who can forget the Tiffany HardWear collection released in 2017? Looking to New York City and a unisex bracelet found in the house’s 1971 archive for inspiration, the bracelets, necklaces, earrings, and rings play with tension, proportion, and balance. The Link Bracelet, for example, features large-gauge links in glimmering 18ct rose gold accented by shimmering diamonds, while the Drop Earrings encompass a trio of spheres that dangle from delicate ball chains against captivating locks.
On platinum drop earrings, bracelets, and necklaces, the Tiffany Victoria collection blooms into complex mixed-cut diamond clusters suggestive of flower petals, which can be turned into ornamental headpieces for an unexpected graceful detail. Meanwhile, acclaimed jewelry designer Jean Schlumberger’s works pay tribute to the natural world, with its distinctive bloom of colored gemstones, lending to motifs of wildflowers, twisting vines, and honeybees along with the artisan’s signature X on braided 18ct gold rope rings and the timeless Lynn bracelet.
Afaf (left)wears right hand Tiffany T1 narrow diamond hinged bangle with diamonds in 18ct gold, Tiffany T pavé diamond hinged bangle in 18ct gold left hand Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Lynn Bracelet with diamonds in 18ct gold and platinum, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Sixteen Stone ring with diamonds in 18ct gold and platinum; dress, Abadia. Suhilah (right) wears right hand Tiffany T True hinged bracelet in 18ct gold, Tiffany T1 wide hinged bangle in 18ct gold, Tiffany Atlas® X Closed narrow ring with diamonds in 18ct gold, Tiffany T1 narrow diamond ring in 18ct gold, Tiffany HardWear graduated link necklace in 18ct gold left hand Tiffany T1 wide ring in 18ct gold; Tiffany HardWear graduated link earrings in 18ct gold; top, Dolce & Gabbana at Rubaiyat, pants, Philosophy at Rubaiyat. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
Atlas X – an update to the iconic Atlas collection – is a nod to the Roman numerals on the clock at the Tiffany Fifth Avenue flagship store in New York City. With powerful angles, clean lines, and statement silhouettes united with graphic simplicity, the collection is crafted from 18ct gold, sterling silver, and pavé diamonds. With three different motifs on earrings, pendants, and more, closed and open forms are juxtaposed in a myriad of textures, robust angles, and modern proportions.
In 2020, Tiffany & Co. launched the Diamond Craft Journey, becoming the first global luxury jeweler to disclose the country where its diamonds and stones are crafted. The journey outlines several steps in the brand’s diamond-making process, including responsible sourcing, cutting and polishing, grading and quality control, diamond setting, and packaging.
Read Next: Beyoncé Wears Audrey Hepburn’s Priceless Breakfast At Tiffany’s Diamonds in Her First Tiffany Campaign
Style: Lina Malaika and Samar EdreesHair: Sawsan LilishMakeup: Eilaf SabbaghOn-set producer: Mohammed JassemProduction: Danica ZivkovicSenior fashion market editor: Amine JreissatiPhotography assistant: Asma AlshaikhMakeup assistant: Maysan HarasaniModels: Aisha, Afaf, Suhilah, Noura, Sara

Saudi Designer Daneh Buahmad Celebrates a Decade Since Her Brand’s Launch

Saudi Designer Daneh Buahmad Celebrates a Decade Since Her Brand’s Launch

Celebrating a decade since her brand’s launch, the Saudi designer reflects on coming into her own.
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
A modern muse
This year marks a decade milestone for Saudi designer Daneh Buahmad who launched her label Daneh back in 2011. With a focus on comfort, Buahmad is known for her contemporary tailoring, draping, and timeless silhouettes that draw inspiration from men’s thobes. “When I’m designing, the Daneh woman is in my head. She is the woman who is making a difference, achieving her goals, standing up for herself, and has a presence. And that should be every woman,” asserts the designer. Buahmad approaches her craft with a mindset to enable women to feel good, confident, and polished. “It makes me happy when I see any woman wearing my designs, and even happier when I get notes from my customers about compliments they received,” notes Buahmad, whose pieces have been worn by Queen Rania and Melissa McCarthy. As well as a degree in interactive media and a career in IT, Buahmad took courses at Central Saint Martins alongside completing her master’s in London. “My corporate career is a part of me, and fashion design feeds a part of my soul that IT can’t, and I’m happy to be involved in both right now,” she says. Buahmad’s entrepreneurial spirit and sharp eye for sourcing fabrics run through her blood. “My grandmother was a small business owner in fabrics,” she shares. “Her store was full of imported textiles. I used to love seeing all the rolls.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Setting the mood
In her studio, Buahmad finds energy through music. “It’s a big part of my life and I love all kinds of music,” she says. Depending on her mood, she switches between the smooth vocals of Jorja Smith and soulful sounds of Algerian band Tinariwen to Pablo Alborán and songs from the Hamilton soundtrack. Her latest mood board is linked to American singer Donna Summer. “I attended a small wedding when I was young. It started out normal with negazi music that suddenly stopped, and disco started playing,” she reminisces with laughter. “I’m working on something that is more focused on my heritage, specifically from the eastern province of Saudi Arabia– a statement piece that tells my story.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Relaxed elegance
Buahmad’s personal style speaks volumes. “I like things oversized – white boyfriend shirts and quirky pieces. I’m a sucker for statement boots and sneakers,” she says. “I’m either super casual or dressed up; there’s no room for in-between.” By day, you’ll find her in R13 and Acne Studios tops paired with Moussy and Levi’s jeans. Adding a sentimental touch to her look, Buahmad pulls her mother’s gold chain metal bag and a brown leather belt from the Seventies that belonged to father. Her repertoire of eveningwear is dramatic, uplifting, and bold. “I love pieces by Vivienne Westwood, Maison Margiela, and Junya Watanabe – they are investments and will always stand out. I also have a black dress I’ve owned for more than 10 years that I’m still excited to wear.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Scent profile
While scents can take you back to a specific time, sometimes it’s a striking perfume bottle that evokes nostalgia. “I used to love them when I was a kid; Chanel No.5 and this large Nina Ricci bottle with two doves in my mother’s room,” says Buahmad. Today, her vanity mainstays are Le Labo Noir 29, which was first gifted to her by a friend, and Christian Dior Ambre Nuit.
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Finding Zen
Buahmad is a firm believer in an early morning routine to set the tone for the rest of her day. “I wake up early and try to take time for myself before I jump into work mode. I’ve broken the habit of checking my phone and emails first thing,” she says. “I have some rituals like going to the beach for an hour just to get that energy from the sea,” says the Dubai-based designer. For a refreshing energy boost, Buahmad turns to yin and kundalini yoga. “I like the challenging workout element of it, as well as the calming effect,” she explains. She also finds calmness through shamanic breathwork. “I got into it pre-pandemic. Unfortunately, online sessions didn’t work as well with me, so I’m waiting to go back to big groups as the energy is amazing,” she says.
Green thumb
To find solace, Buahmad retreats to her garden. “It’s personal, I have many memories of gatherings in it, and I’ve watched my plants grow and flourish over time,” she says. Bursting with pink bougainvillea, hibiscus, and fragrant gardenia, her garden is not only an escape where Buahmad finds calm and clarity, it’s also where tends to her vegetable beds. “I’m still an amateur,” she says with a smile. “I have tomatoes, eggplants, melons, cucumbers, and chilis, as well as rosemary, mint, and basil. I have my moments when life feels challenging, but when that happens, I sit back and look around me, at my son, my house, and my garden,” she explains about reflecting in her peaceful oasis. “I think of my family and friends, I think of where I currently am in life, and that as stressful as some phases are or will be, I remind myself that I’m still here and everything will work out.”
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Hair and mekup: Mirna Abdullah

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