Elie Saab

Angelina Jolie Lent Her Elie Saab Oscars Dress to Her Daughter Seven Years On

Angelina Jolie Lent Her Elie Saab Oscars Dress to Her Daughter Seven Years On

Photo: Getty
“Enjoying your vintage pieces, if you have them, and rediscovering some vintage shops seems like part of the way forward.” So said Angelina Jolie of a more conscious approach to fashion, in her cover interview for British Vogue’s March 2021 issue. She actioned this attitude at the premiere for Eternals, where she revealed that her children Zahara, Knox, Vivienne, Shiloh and Maddox – who joined her on the red carpet – had rummaged through her wardrobe to find their respective looks for the evening.
“My kids are all mixed with vintage, and in my old Oscars dress. We did all vintage and upcycled my old stuff,” she mused. Zahara wore the most recognizable outfit: a dazzling Elie Saab couture gown that Jolie wore to the Oscars in 2014. Knox and Maddox sported suiting for the event, Vivienne wore a whimsical dress, and 15-year-old Shiloh wowed in a beige dress – not dissimilar to one Angelina wore to the Emmys back in 1998.
Zahara (third from the right) recycled the dazzling Elie Saab dress that Jolie wore to the Oscars in 2014. Photo: Getty
Angelina herself arrived at the highly-anticipated premiere wearing a draped khaki strapless look from Balmain’s Resort 2022 collection. Stylist Jason Bolden selected vintage Tiffany & Co. jewels for the actor, and commissioned a unique lip cuff.
Ahead of her Vogue shoot, she divulged to British Vogue’s editor-in-chief and European director Edward Enninful that she “invests in quality pieces”, and then “wears them to death”. “I don’t change things often, you know? That’s one of my things,” she said. Testament to this, an array of cherished staples from her own wardrobe featured in her Craig McDean cover shoot.
We hope that her ’90s looks are unearthed soon – that beaded Randolph Duke gown she wore to the Golden Globes in 1999 is a sure-fire winner.
Read Next: Lebanese Couturier Elie Saab on His Home Country, Inspiration, and His Work’s Meaning
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

A Timeline of Beyoncé’s Best Outfits by Arab Designers

A Timeline of Beyoncé’s Best Outfits by Arab Designers

We pay tribute to Queen B by looking back at her most flawless moments wearing Arab designers on the red carpet and beyond. Indeed, some of the superstar singer and mother of three’s most crowning fashion moments have taken place on the red carpets of prestigious award shows and film screenings, where she’s regularly opted for designs by our region’s seasoned couturiers, such as Elie Saab, Reem Acra, and Zuhair Murad. Who can forget the gold, plunging Elie Saab gown she wore to the 64th annual Golden Globe awards? Following that, the singer stunned in a jaw-dropping, floor-length floral and lace Zuhair Murad dress from the brand’s Spring 2016 Couture collection.
Her love affair with Arab labels extends well beyond the red carpet too. Yousef Aljasmi provided the embellished bodysuit she sported in the Lemonade music video, meanwhile, Queen B chose a blue, beaded Georges Chakra gown to submerge herself underwater in Pretty Hurts. For the music video for her song Die With You released in honor of her and Jay Z’s ninth wedding anniversary, Beyoncé wore a turban by Tunisian milliner Donia Allegue.
Read Next: How Beyoncé Became the Most-Awarded Woman in Grammy History

With Fairy Tale Ballgowns Back and Bigger, Will We See a Post-Pandemic Renaissance?

With Fairy Tale Ballgowns Back and Bigger, Will We See a Post-Pandemic Renaissance?

Giambattista Valli. Photo: Courtesy
When best actress nominee Cynthia Erivo stepped out for the virtual golden Globe awards in February wearing a luminous neon Valentino SS21 Haute Couture gown, towering silver platforms, and white leather gloves, she made it clear: while red carpet season might have changed, post-pandemic glamor had arrived. Pierpaolo Piccioli delivered another showstopper in April at the Oscars for best actress nominee Carey Mulligan, whose golden couture gown, embroidered with thousands of sequins, took 350 hours to create and further heralded the triumphant return of wide-skirted, OTT glitz.
1930 Screen Star Jean Harlow. Photographed by G. Rosson
After more than a year of WFH leggings, Zoom tops, and face masks, there has been a renewed appetite for joyful, optimistic, and event dresses that evoke a sense of occasion, says Libby Page, senior market editor at Net-A-Porter. “Bestselling brands include Zimmermann, Chloé, Valentino, and Alex Perry, all of whom showcased vibrant gowns and prints that are meant for a sense of occasion,” she adds. “We believe it is a result of the incredible optimism among our customers as they fall back in love with the joys of dressing up.” Buoyed by the global vaccine rollout and countries slowly opening up again to travel and socializing, audacious dressing is back in rotation.
Carey Mulligan at this year’s Oscars. Photo: Getty
A return to glamour after times of despair is nothing new – culture always responds to trauma, with fashion usually leading the way. The horrors of the first world war and the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic – collectively killing an almost unfathomable 70 million people – was followed by the Roaring Twenties, as if so much sadness could only be washed away with fringed flapper dresses, a daring bob hairstyle, and jazz. Everything came crashing down in 1929, followed by the Great Depression – which Hollywood answered with fur, diamonds, and sultry starlets like Vivien Leigh and Jean Harlow. In 1947, Christian Dior bid adieu to the austere fabrics and designs that characterized the 1930s and 1940s with his lush New Look, its acres of fabric signifying an end to rations and restraint.
Chanel Spring 2021 Couture. Photo: Courtesy of Chanel
The 2000s, however, have seen glamor slowly slip away in favor of street style and athleisure, reaching a fleece-lined nadir during the 2020 lockdowns. forget putting on a ballgown – the entire planet was barely putting on deodorant anymore. What even was the point? But fashion is about the future, even when it references the past. And the point is this: life, and hope, and beauty will always return. Those tracksuit bottoms might be cashmere but they can never compete with the sheer fantastical thrill of being enveloped in an unreasonable amount of tulle, silk, or taffeta. Where would Cinderella be without her gown? Still scrubbing the hearth, probably. Gowns are transformative and restorative – and our post-vaccine future is nothing if not full-on dazzling, with ballgowns taking center stage.
Menna Shalaby at the 2020 El Gouna Film Festival. Photo: Amina Zaher
For her recent ninth wedding anniversary celebrations, Lebanese fashion entrepreneur Karen Wazen Bakhazi stepped out in a neon yellow jacquard Dior gown, the classic silhouette punched up with a vivacious 2021 hue. “I wanted to wear something special to mark the occasion, with a feminine, princess-inspired mood,” she says. “I miss dressing up, and this was such a nice opportunity to wear a dress like this again! I love wearing gowns, they’re always my favourite thing to wear to mark special moments.” Designers both regionally and internationally have also started stepping away from passionless practicality to show revived ballgowns, including Oscar de la Renta, Carolina Herrera, Schiaparelli, and Dior. Zuhair Murad and Elie Saab, too, have returned with live couture shows featuring fantastical creations. For his SS21 collection, Lebanese couturier Rami Kadi included a show-stopping pearled ivory ballgown embroidered with crystals and ostrich feathers, as well as a jacquard gown with Disney fairies whimsically embellished across the asymmetrical skirt. “I want women to feel the best of themselves, as if this is their favorite version: strong, confident, feminine, and fierce,” Kadi notes. “After the pandemic, we are seeing a return to authenticity. Owning a couture piece is like owning a master painting; a piece that you will forever sustain and cherish and that your children and grandchildren can inherit.”
Viktor and Rolf Spring 2021 Couture. Photo: Team Peter Stigter
For those of us not willing to go full Met Gala at brunch and completely forgo the ease of wear we’ve become accustomed to this past year, the ballgowns of this new era masterfully blend glamour and comfort. At Carolina Herrera, Wes Gordon showed dresses in cotton, without boned bustiers, while Wazen chose her Dior frock partly because “it was cut to a midi length, so not only did it feel special, but it was ultra comfortable to wear.” This season’s gowns are not just for weddings and the red carpet; they are made for movement, with the full skirts also handily providing a built-in social-distancing mechanism. “Overall, designers have demonstrated a positive outlook for the season as they move towards more sophisticated fabrics and standout details in their collections,” reflects Page about Net-A-Porter’s occasion wear. “One of our bestselling gowns continues to be the exclusive Oscar de la Renta strapless metallic brocade gown retailing for £10 845 (about AED 48 600) – we sold multiple units in just one day earlier this year. In terms of occasion footwear, Amina Muaddi is the queen.”
Oscar de la Renta. Photo: Courtesy of Oscar de la Renta
Times have been bleak – but take a peak underneath and you’ll see a slip of gown waiting to be unleashed. We want to dress up and celebrate, not continue as if nothing happened. We want to bask in the gloriousness of life; take urgent pleasure in the moment; go from effortless to effort-full. And what could be a better dress to do that in than a ballgown?
Rami Kadi. Photo: Supplied
Read Next: 34 Wedding Dress Ideas from the FW21 Couture Shows
Originally published in the July/August 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

The Arab Stars and Designers Stealing the Show at Cannes 2021

The Arab Stars and Designers Stealing the Show at Cannes 2021

The Cannes film festival is back, and with it, so is red-carpet glamour. The return has enabled regional stars to flock enthusiastically to the French Riviera and turn heads at the opening ceremony of the 74th Cannes film festival. Arab fashion houses aren’t far behind, becoming the go-to designers for renowned names in the industry for one of the world’s most fashionable red carpets.
Middle Eastern representation was hard to miss as German model Lorena Rae made an appearance in a skin-tone feathered gown by Lebanese designer Elie Saab, while Palestinian-American model Bella Hadid championed vintage fashion in archival Jean Paul Gaultier. Whether it was layered textures carried by Dubai-based influencer Farhana Bodi in a yellow tulle ballgown by Omani label Atelier Zuhra, or Emirati influencer Ola Farahat making a case for the color salmon in an Alberta Ferretti dress, the region’s presence, and design talent reigned at the event.

Click through the gallery above for some of the best Arab representation at the 74th Cannes film festival.

Read Next: All the Best Fashion from the 2021 Cannes Film Festival

All the Highlights from Day Three of Paris Haute Couture Week Fall/Winter 21-22

All the Highlights from Day Three of Paris Haute Couture Week Fall/Winter 21-22

Marking one of the most exciting moments on the fashion calendar that we’ve experienced in a long while, the third day of paris haute couture week was was turbocharged with show-stopping looks by designers.
Read on for more highlights from day three of haute couture week and check back for more updates.
Zuhair Murad

Loyal to his cuts and style, the designer had a royal army collection as his first comeback show. The dazzling collection of evening gowns is a heartfelt tribute to Venice, a city with a history of resilience and bravery.
Elie Saab

The collection, an ode to blooming flora, sees new shapes and techniques with light textures and volumes. Combining bold colors with light pastels, each gown is sewn with flower patterns that symbolize the hope of a better tomorrow.
Balenciaga

With a debut couture show of creative director Demna Gvasalia and the brand’s first in 52 years, the collection borrowed references from its archival roots and proved that it is more than a streetwear brand. The collection was clean, impactful, and reminiscent of the old good days of fashion.
Jean Paul Gaultier

Creative as always, Jean Paul Gaultier unfailingly manages to have avant-guard silhouettes. Returning to couture under a new designer, Sacai, the new line followed traditional upcycling and hybrid construction techniques while incorporating bold experimentation every step of the way.
Viktor & Rolf

The collection is reflective of regal structures and hierarchies, likening those of royals to the fashion system with its ranked seating charts. Always with a touch of humor, but always on point and always as loud and creative, the duo doesn’t stop to amaze.
Read Next: All the Highlights from Day Two of Paris Haute Couture Week Fall/Winter 21-22

5 Things to Know about Elie Saab’s Blossoming Fall 2021-22 Couture Collection

5 Things to Know about Elie Saab’s Blossoming Fall 2021-22 Couture Collection

Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
While blooms and flowers may not come to mind for fall/winter collections, Elie Saab‘s couture creations have always brought about escapism. For his latest, the Lebanese couturier aimed to manifest the world as he sees it and as he wants it to be.
Here, five things to know about Elie Saab’s fall/winter 2021-22 couture collection.

The collection is inspired by Impressionist observations
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
The designer is an Impressionist at heart, and much like his other collections, he expresses his perceptions of nature rather than creating exact representations in this line, depicting tacit imperatives of taste and conscience through the pieces.
The collection’s muse is blooming flora
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
Nature-inspired elements dominate the collection through foliage headpieces and rose-bow belts. Blush plissé is layered into spherical silhouettes to resemble petals while a celestial blue bride dress is embroidered with floral lace.
The collection emanates a perennial hope
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
Each gown is sewn with flower patterns that symbolize a future abundant with possibility, signaling that it is time to achieve, prosper, and blossom. Embroidered buds and branches that emerge and unfold across each piece are emblematic of rebirth and renewal, in hope of a better tomorrow.
The collection combines bold colors with light pastels
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
Bold taffeta asymmetric gowns with oversized off-the-shoulder in saturated reds, blues, pinks and plum, fade into soft off-white and pastel crepe capes. Feathers of every color flutter to create bouquets ballgowns and bombers that rustle and sway, evoking windy fields of flowers.
The couture has fresh textures and volumes
Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab
Beaded petals vine through pastel muslins and organza, redefining feminine curves. Black and red velvets hug contours in alternating waves of opaque and transparency, with layers of chartreuse silk. Three-dimensional flowers stem out of neck and shoulder lines, adding to the collection’s lavish textures and rich volumes.
Read Next: 5 Things to Know About Rami Al Ali’s Unabashedly “Seductive” Fall 2021 Couture Collection

Lebanese Couturier Elie Saab on His Home Country, Inspiration, and His Work’s Meaning

Lebanese Couturier Elie Saab on His Home Country, Inspiration, and His Work’s Meaning

In an issue dedicated to excellence and craftsmanship, Vogue Arabia meets with the couturier who put Arab fashion on the international map.
Photographed by Anthony Arquier for Vogue Arabia
Walking up the grand entrance of Elie Saab’s headquarters in Downtown Beirut, one could never imagine that the vast explosion of last summer had practically decimated the building, or that amid all the chaos and turbulence of the various crises affecting Lebanon would live one of the fashion world’s leading lights. Lebanon’s current circumstances are challenging, but Saab’s outlook is unrelentingly positive. Here he sits, at the head of a marble table, manifesting dreams with needle, thread, and impeccable craftsmanship.
Elie Saab. Photo: Supplied
Saab smiles when I remark on the pleasure at finding his house in such good shape after the blast. “Let me tell you about now,” he starts. “I hate the way people look at us with pity. I hate how they look at us feeling sorry for Lebanon. Lebanon is stronger than this pity. The strength is in its people. Wherever a Lebanese is around the world, they stand out. They shine. It is the people that make our country. What we are experiencing is due to corruption and politicians; they are not giving the people a chance to breathe. We should persevere and continue, stand up, and move on. We have to be positive, always.”
Photographed by Anthony Arquier for Vogue Arabia
Duly, Saab released a homage collection, inspired by his city, Beirut: The Sacred Source. It is replete with Saab’s signature touches, pastels, and sequins; it exudes a refined sense of calm. His pieces are airy and light; they borrow earthy tones and soft shades, speak of inner peace and a sense of confidence. In delicate blues and soft pinks, all is feminine and refined. Like rays filtering through the leaves of a canopy, Saab’s gentle use of color and tone creates a sense of warming tranquility, like sunlight on the face. Following the explosion, the great name of haute couture knew he needed to take a new track to change people’s attention. “I wanted to create a platform for the media, to have an impact on what they say about Lebanon,” Saab shares. “She is a queen and always will be. We need to shine the light on this, rather than sit in the darkness. It’s our responsibility to shed the light on its amazing people and what is positive.”
The designer at three years old. Photo: Supplied
Hailing from Damour, a small town in southern Lebanon, Saab recalls how as a boy, he dreamed of becoming a dressmaker. “At the age of two, I knew I wanted to make people look better. I suffered when I saw a woman wearing something that didn’t suit her, or her hair was a mess, or her makeup was too much or didn’t reflect her,” he recalls. Starting as a dressmaker, his skill with the needle and famed attention to detail led to him opening his atelier in 1982, right in the middle of the civil war. “When I wanted to become a designer, my parents said, ‘You want to be a seamstress?’ I said yes. Today, I have parents approach me with the hope that their kids follow in my footsteps. I have a lot to share,” he affirms. “When I first started, I used to say that I was a Lebanese designer. People would look at me and say, ‘So what?’ but today when you say you’re a Lebanese designer, people look at you differently,” he says, the pride evident in his voice. After dressing countless royals and stars from Queen Rania to Angelina Jolie, it’s no surprise people admire him.
Halle Berry wearing Elie Saab at the 2002 Oscars. Photo: Getty
Saab opened his atelier with five petites mains in 1982, and the haute couture workshop today employs around 250 seamstresses and tailors, 50 petites mains, and 20 embroiderers, some of which have been working with the house for 30 years, with the ratio being 55% women and 45% men. Inspired by the power of dreams, together they brought to life Saab’s new SS21 couture collection. Silvers and blacks flow together to create oversized shapes, while headpieces and earrings evoke thoughts of shooting stars. Constellations abound through lace masks amid exaggerated shapes and textures that transport to another dimension. Embroidered suns and crystalline structures appear otherworldly as dazzling pieces give way to soft taffetas that almost, but not quite, hide the woman. Plunging necklines, trains, and voluminous shoulders daringly mix with sparkling forms, hinting at what might just be beyond the stars.
Photographed by Anthony Arquier for Vogue Arabia
Saab’s inspiration is simple: women. “I believe that every woman has her own character and that should be highlighted in the dress she wears. I never look at what a woman is wearing in general; I always look at her as a whole. She either stands out or doesn’t, depending on her character and what she wears. I believe every woman is beautiful and it all depends on what she wears to bring that out or make it disappear. You can see a woman in a T-shirt and jeans who looks stunning. It’s about bringing out her best.” The couturier’s work is defined by craftsmanship. “Every dress in the haute couture collection is a piece of art, a piece of jewelry handed down from one generation to another. It carries emotional and traditional value. It creates stories in every home,” he says. “I never exaggerate in my designs. I don’t follow fashion.”
Photographed by Anthony Arquier for Vogue Arabia
Saab’s pieces are multi-generational investments, with each detail created with precision and intent. “Haute couture is an investment,” he agrees. “It’s a message the dress gives. It’s credibility that the house has developed and goes from one design to another and from one generation to another.” Each dress can take at least three months to craft, a time where every detail is studied, worked, and tweaked to perfection using expertise gained over decades. “The DNA of the house has been built with more than 40 years of experience and knowledge. The know-how and craftsmanship remains, but maybe changes have been made in new lines or sequins. No matter what technology comes along, at the end of the day, there’s a human hand behind the work,” he states. “The machine cannot design without the person behind it. There are people and talent behind everything we do, their brains, experience, and know-how. The hand is always there. Man, mind, and hand.” The last three words are punctuated by deliberate gestures, the intensity and focus clear.
Photographed by Anthony Arquier for Vogue Arabia
The couturier admits that the challenge today is maintaining the legacy. “One small mistake will ruin the whole name, destroy it all,” he says, pausing. “So, I always work harder. If something is perfect, I don’t stop there, I push harder, and I do it with confidence,” he looks up, nodding. “Sometimes, I look at a dress that a client is wearing, and she’s happy with it, but I’ll ask her to remove it, or ask to change a small detail they don’t see. This is what makes the difference. The worry among people I work with is not about pleasing the customer, but rather pleasing Elie Saab.”
Read Next: Celebrating Enduring Couture That Continues to Thrive in an Era Rocked By a Pandemic
Originally published in the May 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia
Style: Amine JreissatiMakeup: Anabelle Petit at Wise & TalentedProduction: Aurea ProductionPhotography assistant: Richard ChaxStyle assistant: Elise TestotModel: Oulimata Gallet at Women360All fashion Elie Saab Haute Couture

10 Best Celebrity Looks by Arab Designers in 2020

10 Best Celebrity Looks by Arab Designers in 2020

The year 2020 has been one unlike any other. However, despite the many challenges in creativity and cancelation of red carpet events, there were still plenty of noteworthy sartorial moments, particularly at the hands of Arab designers.
A standout moment of the year was Lebanese soprano Majida El Roumi‘s first-ever magazine cover story, for Vogue Arabia’s June 2020 issue. The icon looked extraordinary in gowns by Lebanese couturiers Georges Hobeika and Zuhair Murad for her cover shoot.
Arguably, some of this year’s best looks came from Saudi Arabia‘s most international designer, and Vogue Arabia’s December 2020 cover star Ashi, founder of the label Ashi Studio. Several of Ashi’s incredible creations were worn by French-Italian supermodel, and fellow Vogue Arabia December cover star Cindy Bruna, for their shoot. Additionally, one of the most talked-about ensembles of the year was Beyoncé‘s black hand-made embroidered piece by Ashi Studio, worn in her Black Is King film. And who can forget the custom-made white Ashi Studio number worn by actor Billy Porter to the virtual Emmy Awards?
From Jennifer Lopez‘s showstopping sweeping black gown by Lebanese designer Georges Hobeika at the Sag Awards in January to the elegant glittering gold Zuhair Murad creation worn by Egyptian icon Yousra to the Oscars in February, Arab designers were once again responsible for creating some of the very best looks at Hollywood award events. Perhaps one of the most memorable looks of the awards season is the gown by Syrian designer Reem Masri, worn by Oscar-nominated filmmaker Waad Al-Kateab, that was embellished with calligraphy translating to, “we dared to dream and we will not regret dignity.” Unsurprisingly, Elie Saab‘s stunning creations were also a favorite among stars this year, especially the voluminous dress worn by Mulan star Liu Yifei, for her Hollywood red carpet debut.
As 2020 comes to a close, take a look at Vogue Arabia’s pick of the best looks by Arab designers this year, in the gallery above.
Read Next: Exclusive: Kim Kardashian West on Launching Skims in the Middle East

How You Can Now Shop Elie Saab’s Luxury Collections on Amazon

How You Can Now Shop Elie Saab’s Luxury Collections on Amazon

Elie Saab Spring 2021 Ready-to-Wear collection. Photo: Courtesy of Elie Saab

Lebanese couturier Elie Saab is further expanding in the US market with his designs now available to shop on Amazon’s new high-fashion platform, Luxury Stores, via the e-tailer’s app.
Saab’s creations are adored across the world, becoming a red carpet favorite among Hollywood and regional stars alike, with fans including Jennifer Lopez, Angelina Jolie and Nancy Ajram. Now the label’s fall/winter ready-to-wear 2020 line will be available for fans to buy on Amazon’s new platform, which launched in September as a rival to luxury retailers including Net-a-Porter and Farfetch.

The Lebanese fashion house turned to Instagram to announce its partnership with Luxury Stores at Amazon. The brand wrote: “ELIE SAAB is proud to announce its collaborative partnership with Luxury Stores at Amazon. Discover pieces from our Ready-to-Wear Fall Winter 2020 collection available for exclusive purchase through the Amazon luxury stores App #ELIESAAB”
The new partnership is a part of Elie Saab’s increasing digital offerings, with the brand’s chief executive, Elie Saab Jr, explaining, “Joining forces with Amazon is a step forward in Elie Saab’s business strategy, to strengthen its existence in the US market through a new widespread e-commerce presence, while also reaching a new generation of luxury shoppers.”
Luxury Stores sets its self apart from Amazon’s main site, with users being exclusively invited to shop on the app. However, users can also request access on the portal’s website. Other major designers available on the platform include, Oscar de la Renta and Roland Mouret, in addition to luxe beauty brands such as La Mer and Cle de Peau Beaute. Unfortunately, only US customers currently have access to shopping online with Luxury Stores.
Read Next: Katy Perry Proved Herself to Be a Fan of Arab Designers with These Two Outfits

Emma Stone’s Elie Saab Dress is the Star of Sotheby’s Auction to Support Beirut

Emma Stone’s Elie Saab Dress is the Star of Sotheby’s Auction to Support Beirut

The custom-made Elie Saab dress, worn by actor Emma Stone to the 2015 Oscars, is available at Sotheby’s To Beirut with Love auction. Photo: Courtesy of Sotheby’s

Sotheby’s has announced its plans for a charitable auction in order to raise funds for Beirut. The auction, titled To Beirut with Love will feature a handful of extraordinary items, including a custom Elie Saab dress, worn by award-winning actor Emma Stone to the 2015 Oscars.
The British-founded auction house has partnered with two nonprofit organizations, Creatives for Lebanon and Art for Beirut to develop the To Beirut with Love initiative, in order to support those affected by the Beirut explosion. The sale will be open for bidding from December 7 to December 15, where a number of handpicked donations from iconic artists, celebrities, and fashion and jewelry designers will be on offer.
The star of the auction is noted to be a breathtaking gown by Lebanese couturier, Elie Saab. The pale-green sequined dress features an open back and a thigh-high slit and was worn by Stone, at the Oscars ceremony in 2015 where she was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Birdman. The stunning gown is estimated to sell for between £20,000 to £30,000 ($26,700 to $40,025).
A silk haute couture gown designed by Egyptian actor Sherihan, worn in her Thousand and One Nights Fawazeer show in 1987, is available in the To Beirut with Love auction. Photo: Courtesy of Sotheby’s

Other remarkable fashion items include singer Madonna‘s matador-inspired outfit created by Lebanese designer Nicolas Jebran; and Geri Halliwell’s sequinned number worn in the music video for the Spice Girl‘s debut single Wannabe. Additionally, a silk haute couture gown designed by Egyptian icon Sherihan, for her Thousand and One Nights Fawazeer show in 1987, has been donated alongside Lebanese singer Majida El Roumi‘s unique sky-blue embellished dress from her wardrobe collection.
Woven yellow gold My Dior cuff, designed by Victoire de Castellane. Photo: Courtesy of Sotherby’s

Leading the jewelry line-up is the unmissable My Dior cuff and British-artist Damien Hirst‘s gold pill bracelet with diamond skull. The eye-catching gold My Dior bracelet, designed by artistic director of Dior Joaillerie, Victoire de Castellane, features a dazzling array of diamonds and colored gemstones and is expected to generate at least £30,000 to £50,000 ($40,025 to $66,700). Elsewhere Hirst’s playful bracelet, created in 2015, reflects the theme of pharmaceuticals, which is often present in contemporary artist’s work.
Among many of the captivating artworks is a photograph taken from the Suit Egyptienne series by leading Lebanese photographer Fouad Elkoury. British supermodel Naomi Campbell has also donated one of her favorite portraits, an image of herself shot by photographers Rocco Lapasta and Charles DeCaro, that is estimated to sell for £3,000 to £5,000 ($4,000 to $6,671).
Portrait of model Naomi Campbell, photographed by Rocco Lapasta and Charles DeCaro. Photo: Courtesy of Sotheby’s

Sotheby’s has confirmed that all the proceeds from the auction will be shared among five charities that are providing relief to Beirut following the tragic port explosion in August. The five charities chosen by the initiative are Nusaned, Beit El Baraka, Baytna Baytak, Al Fanar, and House of Christmas.
“Lebanon is home to an artistic community whose contributions to the cultural landscape cannot be overstated,” says Sotheby’s chairman for the Middle East, Edward Gibbs. “The explosion in the port of Beirut this summer sent shockwaves through the city and the world, impacting every sector of society in Lebanon with countless tales of loss, damage, and displacement. Sotheby’s has come together with our partners to host the auction, To Beirut with Love, to provide much-needed relief and funds to aid the healing process.”
Read Next: These Are The 10 Most Influential Fashion Moments of 2020

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com