Dior

Aseel Omran Showcases the Most Stunning Pieces From the Dior Print High Jewelry Collection

Aseel Omran Showcases the Most Stunning Pieces From the Dior Print High Jewelry Collection

Dior Print earrings and necklace in white gold with diamonds, Dior High jewelry. Photo: Luc Braquet
Dior never fails to dazzle the world with its extraordinary mastery. And this season, the French luxury fashion house has outdone itself with a high jewelry collection that demands to be admired.
Consisting of 137 remarkable pieces that fit as perfectly as an haute couture gown, Dior’s new jewelry line, named Dior Print, was inspired by the creative director of Dior Joaillerie Victoire de Castellane’s desire to “draw prints on jewelry”. So, the pieces feature liberty prints, checks, stripes and tie-dye motifs, all of which appear not on clothes, but on necklaces, earrings, bracelets, and more.
Solitaire necklace in pink and yellow gold with diamonds and emeralds, Tie and Dior bracelet in white gold with diamonds, emeralds, sapphires and tsavorite grenats, Dior print ring in white, pink and yellow gold with diamonds, emeralds, sapphires, tourmalines, tsavorite, violet garnets and red spinels, Dior High Jewelry. Photo: Luc Braquet
The journey to get here was anything but easy—Victoire de Castellane spent a great deal of time researching on how to make one-of-a-kind jewelry pieces, studying lace in Dior Dior Dior in 2018, textile dye effects in Tie & Dior in 2020, and braids in Galons Dior in January 2022. And the hard work paid off—Dior’s latest offerings, seen in the pages of Vogue Arabia on Saudi Arabian actress Aseel, jump off the page with their sharp cuts and undeniable charm. Think structured earrings, ribbon-like chokers, and stunning floral rings. The Dior Print collection also boasts a dreamy range of drop earrings, pendants and cufflinks, proving that the fashion house has something to offer to just about everyone.
Dior Print earrings and necklace in pink gold with diamonds and rubies, Dior High Jewelry. Photo: Luc Braquet
Look closer, and there’s missing the impeccable craftsmanship that has gone into each Dior Print creation. To make the fabric motifs work on jewelry’s intrictae scale, Dior’s jewelers reworked and adjusted two main factors—the type of setting, and the density of the multicolored gems used in each piece. “When ribbons undulate, the print must follow,” Victoire de Castellane explained. “As with couture, it’s a process that requires a series of adjustments. The work is all the more precise due to the settings’ curved surfaces, which distort prints and lines.” Bringing together a melange of precious stones, from diamonds and Colombian emeralds, to Madagascar sapphires and Mozambique rubies, this jewelry line is one for the books.
Dior Print earrings, necklace, rings in white gold with diamonds and sapphires, Dior High jewelry. Photo: Luc Braquet
Gem Dior necklace and ring in white gold with diamonds, Dior High Jewelry. Photo: Luc Braquet
Photography: Luc Braquet Style: Elena Psalti Producer: Danica ZivkovicOn-set producer: Julia Ibatullina Hair: Taan Doan at L’Atelier68 Makeup: Claire Gil at Noob agency Manicure: Audrey Cheri at B Agency 

Dior’s Kim Jones Will Present the Pre-Fall Men’s Collection Against the Giza Pyramids in Egypt This Year

Dior’s Kim Jones Will Present the Pre-Fall Men’s Collection Against the Giza Pyramids in Egypt This Year

Vogue Arabia, November 2019 Photo: Elizaveta Porodina.
The MENA region is once again gearing up to host a major fashion spectacle as Dior announces Egypt as the venue of its next men’s show. Come December 3, the Giza Pyramids in Cairo will become the backdrop of the fashion house’s Pre-Fall 2023 menswear collection designed by artistic director Kim Jones.
According to a statement shared with WWD, “the celestial collection celebrates a lifelong passion for travel,” given that Jones spent his childhood years in Africa and is known for his love for globetrotting and staging his menswear designs abroad. Although the upcoming show marks Dior’s first in Egypt, the French fashion house’s relationship with the country dates back to 2004. It is when Dior’s then-creative director took inspiration from his travels to Egypt to create the iconic Spring/Summer couture collection replete with cultural details.
Dior Spring/Summer 2002 couture
The Pre-Fall show will also be the second one post-Covid after last year’s London presentation since Jones brought back traveling shows after halting them due to coronavirus restrictions. Previously, Dior has staged collections in Spain, China, Greece, Italy, South Korea, the UK, and the US.
Dior is not the only luxury fashion brand to have set its sights on the Middle East and North Africa in recent years. In 2021, the UAE hosted Giorgio Arman’s One Night Only show celebrating the 10-year anniversary of the first-ever Armani Hotel in Dubai, while Chanel later showcased its Cruise 2021/22 collection in the emirate, which was followed by Christian Dior’s first exhibition in the Middle East, in Doha, Qatar.
Read Next: 5 Things To Know About Christian Dior’s Folky FW 2022 Haute Couture Show

15 Gorgeous Wedding Gowns From the Fall 2022 Haute Couture Shows

15 Gorgeous Wedding Gowns From the Fall 2022 Haute Couture Shows

Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue. If you’re currently planning your big day, there’s no way you haven’t already started thinking about all the special elements that will make your wedding day look one to remember. If you’re struggling with zeroing on the perfect bridal gown, however, a great place to look for some inspiration is on the runways of this season’s haute couture showcases.
The Fall 2022 shows had Alexis Mabille, Chanel and Dior making a case for pared-down bridal wear via pastel folk-style embroidery, universally flattering cuts (think mermaid silhouettes, high-low summer-ready hems, and sweet A-line pieces), and easy fabrics. While the strapless wedding-ready maxi at Chanel was topped off with a matching stole and ivory bow on the head, Dior’s models styled their romantic ensembles with barely-there makeup and soft low ponytails.
For the bride who’s up for a sartorial experiment, there was no missing Antonio Grimaldi’s sculpted silhouettes, which brought together unconventional necklines, cut-out detailing, and for accessories, jewels that ran from the top of the head down to the chin for that extra dose of drama. The not-so-basic bridal trend also found itself spotlighted on Rome’s Spanish Steps, where Pierpaolo Piccioli sent out a slinky white gown, complete with thigh-high slit, hidden metallic bustier, and black bows at the Valentino show. Over at Giambattista Valli, another conversation-starter piece was a feather-trimmed, semi-sheer bodycon number that enveloped the model’s shoulders in a larger-than-life snowy white bow.
Love it or hate it, there’s no denying the fact that the one bridal trend that never seems to fade away is the more-is-more gown—and Fall 2022’s haute couture shows serve as proof. At Zuhair Murad’s presentation, a sparkling strapless gown doused in stars closed the show, while Rami Al Ali added a little color to the mix with a blush pink sequined number trimmed with pleated ruffles. Elie Saab’s bride walked the runway in a gold gown complete with matching veil and embellished bouquet, Balenciaga presented an equally dramatic bejeweled gown in shades of ivory and silver, and Dolce & Gabbana replaced traditional veils with a headpiece that’s not for the faint-hearted.
Below, scroll through the most interesting wedding gowns from the Fall 2022 haute couture shows.
Elie Saab. Photo: Gorunway.com
Alexis Mabille. Photo: Gorunway.com
Antonio Grimaldi. Photo: Gorunway.com
Balenciaga. Photo: Gorunway.com
Chanel. Photo: Gorunway.com
Dior. Photo: Gorunway.com
Dolce & Gabbana. Photo: Gorunway.com
Elie Saab. Photo: Gorunway.com
Zuhair Murad. Photo: Gorunway.com
Giambattista Valli. Photo: Gorunway.com
Balenciaga. Photo: Gorunway.com
Rami Al Ali. Photo: Gorunway.com
Valentino. Photo: Gorunway.com
Alexis Mabille. Photo: Gorunway.com
Zuhair Murad. Photo: Gorunway.com

5 Things To Know About Christian Dior’s Folky AW 2022 Haute Couture Show

5 Things To Know About Christian Dior’s Folky AW 2022 Haute Couture Show

Living in a moment Maria Grazia Chiuri said she did not like, the creative director used her Dior Haute Couture show as an act of coming together. Anders Christian Madsen reports on the new collaboration with the Ukrainian artist Olesia Trofymenko and the tree of life motif at the heart of the collection.

Maria Grazia Chiuri called for awareness
Photo: Courtesy of Vogue.co.uk

Backstage, before her haute couture show, Maria Grazia Chiuri was wearing the slogan T-shirt she designed for her first Christian Dior ready-to-wear collection in 2016: “We Should All Be Feminists.” It wasn’t part of her new collection, but six years after the designer initially set the tone for a conscious new Dior, she said it was time to reiterate her purpose. “We are living in a moment I don’t like. I am worried that it’s only going to get worse. This is the reality,” she said, referring to the new anti-abortion laws in America. “In Rome, I’ve been seeing posters on the street I don’t like. It’s like a flashback to the past. It’s impacting the lives of all the women who work here. I have this worry that something will happen and I won’t be conscious of it happening. So, I want to be aware.”

Chiuri worked with the Ukrainian artist Olesia Trofymenko
Photo: Courtesy of Vogue.co.uk

Awareness has been the foundation of Chiuri’s residency at Dior, and when it comes to haute couture – a product made for the few and privileged – she justifies its existence by using her platform to promote people and messages that make a difference. This season, she gave her spotlight to the Ukrainian artist Olesia Trofymenko, whose embroidery-based work she had discovered in the Maxxi museum in Rome earlier this year. “Immediately, when I saw her work, I realized that her embroideries come from folk costume,” Chiuri said, tracing the brainwaves that pieced together a collection founded in folk dress, folkloric motifs and the embroidery that has historically been used to illustrate them – executed in collaboration with the Chanakya School of Craft in India, a long-time collaborator of Chiuri.

The collection was based on the tree of life
Photo: Courtesy of Vogue.co.uk

In her enormous tent raised in the back garden of Musée Rodin and lined with milelong front rows, Chiuri once again covered the walls of her show in fully-embroidered tapestries, this time by Trofymenko. They heralded a collection centered around the tree of life motif favored by the artist. “She gave the reference of the tree of life, a symbol I like a lot. It represents the circle of life. I think that’s important in this moment in time because we constantly have to change the way we work and build bridges between different knowledge and savoir-faire,” said Chiuri, whose season had also included an encounter with Ursula von der Leyen, the President of the European Commission, who has established a network of European artists and artisans “to build a better tomorrow”.

Chiuri interpreted folk costumes from around the world
Photo: Courtesy of Vogue.co.uk

Trofymenko’s trees of life appeared in various painstaking embroideries throughout a collection defined by the meeting between folky patterns and the unmistakable silhouette of Dior. In her research, Chiuri looked at folk costumes from around the world and realized that the patterns used to signify a regional belonging often have a lot in common across borders and beliefs. Through the grammar of haute couture, she freely mixed her inspirations in a collection that felt like a wardrobe for the global community. Applied to the Bar-jacketed lines of Dior, her folkloric foundation inevitably infused proceedings with an earthy and rootsy spirit, which felt very organic. It was a kind of Earth Mother look, which linked to Chiuri’s post-pandemic approach. Now, she said, is a time for coming together and rebuilding the world we want to live in.
Chiuri reflected upon the state of the world

Chiuri closed her collection preview by reflecting upon the state of the world and the impact every disastrous event of our moment in time has on a global company like Dior. She talked about the terrifying rise of the pro-life movement in America, the war in Ukraine and the ongoing Covid limitations in China. “There are people in my studio, who haven’t seen their family for three years,” Chiuri said. At Dior, she continues to use her platform to create the consciousness she said is vital in a reactionary time. As ever, her message was one of coming together: as the third-biggest industry in the world, fashion has the power to make a difference and we need to figure out how.

Originally published in Vogue.co.uk
Read next: The 10 Most Beautiful Wedding Dresses from the Spring/Summer 2022 Haute Couture Season

5 Things To Know About Dior’s New Couture-Inspired High Jewelry Collection

5 Things To Know About Dior’s New Couture-Inspired High Jewelry Collection

Photo: Courtesy of Dior
In her 24 years as creative director at Dior Joaillerie, Victoire de Castellane has explored every aspect of the Christian Dior universe, from the designer’s beloved roses to his adeptness with couture’s finishing touches – ribbons, lace and braiding among them. Instead of the traditional, formal parures that once dominated high jewelry, she has helped herald a new, more relaxed, ultimately more wearable, era for the ultra-luxe category, marrying exquisite craftsmanship and the finest gemstones with a joie de vivre and lightness of touch, which her clients – female and male alike – find irresistible. For Dior Print, de Castellane’s latest collection, British Vogue’s jewelry and watch director Rachel Garrahan tells you five things you need to know.

Dior Print is a quest for joy
Photo: Courtesy of Dior

For de Castellane, creating jewelry for Dior is always a search for Christian Dior’s identity and, above all, “a quest for joy”. More than ever since the pandemic, color and pattern have become important to her since they’re guaranteed to raise a smile. “I want joy because the world is tough,” she says. She was among the first high jewelers to incorporate a wide palette of colored gemstones beyond the traditional Big Three (rubies, sapphires and emeralds), opening our eyes to a juicy kaleidoscope of opals, spinels, tourmalines, and many more. That passion for color together with her love of playfulness and asymmetry is brought to bear in Dior Print as opals jostle with sapphires and diamonds, and ear cuffs and mismatched earrings encapsulate a youthful wearability and a contemporary edge.
The collection is an original take on the Dior archive
Photo: Courtesy of Dior

Given her mastery of color and mixing of gem cuts to 3D effect, it is perhaps surprising that this is the first collection in which de Castellane takes a turn into couture’s mastery of printed patterns. Always pushing herself to experiment, “to not be bored by myself” as she puts it, she recalls of the collection’s genesis: “Why don’t we play with classic prints, and rewrite them, in rhythms for example?” Checks, stripes and floral patterns are realized in precious stones, their setting a confection of cuts, a rainbow of color, a harmonious cacophony of texture that encompasses voluminous curving rings and simple diamond line brooches that suggest abstract offcuts of couture fabric. The floral print of one 1948 dress inspired a necklace of tiny multicolored daises set in relief on an asymmetric ribbon of diamonds and gold that wends it way about the neck. In a matching set of necklace and earrings, an ombré effect is achieved by blue sapphires that bleed their way haphazardly into a network of white diamonds.
The show was set in the ancient Sicilian town of Taormina
Photo: Courtesy of Dior

The historic Grand Hotel Timeo in the hilltop town of Taormina on Sicily’s Southern coast provided the dreamy backdrop to the collection’s presentation. With an ancient Greek theatre on one side and, on the other, gardens of bougainvillea and lemon trees that spill down the hill overlooking the magnificent Bay of Naxos and a smoking Mount Etna – from which red hot lava was still flowing after a recent eruption – it was a suitably dramatic setting for the collection’s unveiling and a welcome opportunity post-pandemic, says de Castellane, “to enjoy the presentation of fashion and jewellery coming together”.
Maria Grazia Chiuri created 40 haute couture dresses specially for the show
Photo: Courtesy of Dior

As she did for 2019’s Gem Dior presentation of high jewelry in Venice, Maria Grazia Chiuri created 40 unique, exquisitely detailed black gowns and louche trouser suits for the collection’s candlelit presentation on the Timeo’s extended top terrace. For de Castellane, this effortless and fruitful collaboration with her fashion counterpart is one for which she is grateful, noting that it is particularly apt at a house like Dior, which has femininity at its very heart. “Women understand women,” says de Castellane. “There’s a complicity even without our speaking.”
The idea comes first, then the challenge of creation
Photo: Courtesy of Dior

“In every aspect of my life, I don’t want to be bound,” laughs de Castellane. She is a designer who lets her imagination run riot with an idea for a jewel, before challenging Dior’s atelier of master craftspeople to bring it to life. One such creation is Dior Print’s masterpiece necklace, a delicate interlacing of multiple precious ribbons in different patterns, colors and textures. The challenge of how to make this magnificent bib flexible, light and wearable owes its success to Dior’s watchmaking skills. Beneath its bejeweled patterns lies a hidden network of tiny watch bracelet links that ensures a perfect fit every time. Ultimately, de Castellane is led by a quest for balance and harmony of color, shape and movement: “I think of every piece as a family, a family that has to work together.” Fait accompli.
Originally published in Vogue.com uk
Read next: Starchitect Peter Marino on Reimagining Dior Iconic 30 Avenue Montaigne Boutique

Let Karen Wazen’s Modest Black Maxi Dress Inspire Your Next Suhoor Look

Let Karen Wazen’s Modest Black Maxi Dress Inspire Your Next Suhoor Look

Photo: Instagram.com/karenwazen
Dressing up for a suhoor gathering calls for a look that is as comfortable as it is elegant, and Karen Wazen nailed just that with her recent outfit. While in Sharjah attending a suhoor hosted by Dior, the entrepreneur picked the breezy silhouette of a maxi dress in black, a fail-safe color for evening wear. The dress, made entirely with a shimmering fabric, was picked from the fashion house’s dedicated Ramadan capsule collection and features a modest high neck, and full-length sleeves.
Photo: Instagram.com/karenwazen
Wazen kept the accessories to a minimum as one does for a laid-back late evening in Ramadan, and opted for a pair of dainty drop earrings, and a black Lady D-joy bag. Sporting a sleek blowdry, the mother-of-three went for a neutral monochrome makeup look, which included a subtle brown eyeshadow, peach-toned blush, and a matte brownish nude lip.

The day was particularly special for Wazen, who also celebrated her birthday on April 10. Taking to Instagram to share her gratitude for the birthday wishes, Wazen posted pictures of herself celebrating the day with her husband Elias Bakhazi and their children. This time, Wazen was seen in a pared-back halter neck dress in metallic green fabric, which will be perfect come party season, or for nights out in summer.
Read Next: Karen Wazen and Lojain Omran Make a Case for Bright Colors and Feathers at Kris Fade’s Wedding

Starchitect Peter Marino on Reimagining Dior’s Iconic 30 Avenue Montaigne Boutique

Starchitect Peter Marino on Reimagining Dior’s Iconic 30 Avenue Montaigne Boutique

Dior opens its renovated 30 Avenue Montaigne and with it, a new Paris landmark is born.
Photo: Adrien Dirand and Kristen Pelou. Courtesy of Dior
“Joyfulness, happiness, gravity, and visual pleasure,” remarks starchitect Peter Marino. These are the emotions he hopes clients to the newly renovated Dior 30 Avenue Montaigne boutique will experience. If gravity stands out, there’s a reason – the space is nothing short of astronomical in size, at 10 000 sqm across seven floors. The expanse is further pronounced by a 303 inch rose pointing upwards to the heavens of luxury, signed Isa Genzken, and which fi rst featured in Qatar at the Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams exhibition. If Marino has signed fashion boutiques the world over, as well as luxury hotels (most recently the Cheval Blanc in Paris), he considers this achievement in a rank of its own. “It was the first boutique of Monsieur Dior,” he says of the 8th arrondissement address. “Moreover, this historic 18th century facade is Louis XVI, le siècle d’or. So, I would say that this project is different from the previous ones in a way that it is closer to Christian Dior’s real spirit.”
Photo: Adrien Dirand and Kristen Pelou. Courtesy of Dior
A black and white photograph of Monsieur Dior hanging inside the boutique reminds what a personal and intimate space this is. A private mansion built in 1865 by Count Colonna-Walewski, a son of Napoleon I, it was inaugurated as the house of Christian Dior in 1946. The address was chosen for its modern proportions, understated setting, and neoclassical facade. In his total restr ucturing of space, Marino comments that “form and functionality ” serve as his parameters. “I’m always jealous of fashion designers because their visions are realized so quickly,” he says. “Architectural construction is painfully long.” Marino, who founded his namesake firm in New York in 1978 and who has collaborated with the maison Dior for more than 25 years, has nonetheless persevered at creating flagships in London, Seoul, Tokyo, and Los Angeles.
Photo: Adrien Dirand and Kristen Pelou. Courtesy of Dior
Although Marino’s world is synonymous with fashion – his relationship with LVMH dates decades – his inspirations often come from the world of art. For the Dior boutique, he commissioned numerous pieces: there is a custom wall collage by Guy Limone using archival Dior photos and a mirror glass wall sculpture by Claudia Weiser. On the ground floor there is a video installation by Jennifer Steinkamp; a commissioned sculpture by Johan Creten; wall panels by Sophie Coryndon; and custom elevator doors by Nancy Lorenz, to name a few.
The entry features abstract white leaves falling freely in space by Paul Cocksedge. Ask Marino to choose the crown jewel of the space and he responds that while he considers everything unique, an exceptional feat is that it is now a multilevel store. “It is a journey through the inner essence of the brand, expressed through the architecture, interior design, and experience of each space. It’s not one idea throughout, but rather a walk-through space that tells a story that keeps the customer engaged and emotionally connected with Dior from start to finish. It’s about creating environments that allow the customer to explore the brand in a beautiful, immersive, delightful way. Dior is about beauty and femininity – we’ve added gardens, white silk curtains, and his favorite, 18th century parquet de Versailles,” he shares
Photo: Adrien Dirand and Kristen Pelou. Courtesy of Dior
A look into the past doesn’t stop at the parquet, however. Venture down the staircase and experience La Galerie Dior, an exhibition space which honors the work of Monsieur Dior and his successors, Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons, and Maria Grazia Chiuri. Here, discover numerous curiosities, including a metal star that Dior once tripped on in the street, and which he chose as good fortune – and a symbol of the house to this day. Should hunger strike, look no further than the boutique’s Jean Imbert-helmed restaurant featuring a color-splash art wall by French artist Guy Limone.
Read Next: Exclusive: Anya Taylor-Joy Takes Us Inside Dior’s Iconic and Newly Renovated 30 Avenue Montaigne Boutique
Originally published in the April 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

Saudi Actor Aseel Omran on Becoming Dior’s First Arab Ambassador: “There Are No Limits to Anyone’s Potential”

Saudi Actor Aseel Omran on Becoming Dior’s First Arab Ambassador: “There Are No Limits to Anyone’s Potential”

Photo: Abdullah Elmaz
First came the invitation to Saudi artist Manal Al Dowayan to contribute to the design of a Lady Dior bag, now, Dior announces Saudi actor Aseel Omran as its first ambassador in the Middle East. Omran joins international superstars who are Dior brand ambassadors, such as Charlize Theron, Sharon Stone, and Monica Bellucci. “This has proven to me that working hard to achieve my big dreams is always possible,” Omran says. “To me, Dior is the image of a dreamy, classy, and simple woman. Yet, a strong and sophisticated one at the same time.”
Throughout her childhood, Omran loved to play dress-up whenever she was near her mother’s closet. “I remember looking at a portrait of my parents, where my mom was wearing a beautiful red silk shirt that I admired,” she shares. One day, she found a Dior shirt in her closet, and it felt like love at first sight. She asked her mother if she could have it when she grew up and years later, Omran still has that shirt today. As a young girl, Omran was also influenced by her older sister, TV presenter Lojain Omran.
Photo: Getty
Her love for creativity prompted Omran to embark on an artistic journey. In 2006, she participated in a TV singing competition and reached the finals. Omran then began a career with Rotana Group, the largest entertainment company in the Arab world, where she stayed for 15 years. In 2016, she sang on “Don’t You Need Somebody” with Enrique Iglesias and Shaggy, but always stayed focused on her acting career. She’s been a part of productions also starring Hayat Al Fahad and Hussein Al Mansour, including Exit 7 (2020), Black Crows (2017), and Hiya Wa Huwa (2010) and is currently filming her first Saudi movie.
Photo: Abdullah Elmaz
The Dior announcement aligns with Omran’s goals and vision. Working with womenswear and fine jewelry, she believes that her and Dior share the same values of simplicity, authenticity, and elegance, which are core to the maison. Dior has released its new Ramadan collection in alignment with the announcement of Omran joining as its first ambassador in the region. The collection, which is exclusively designed for Ramadan, represents a contemporary identity to the traditional Ramadan pieces that women are accustomed to wearing during the Holy Month. Dior, however, introduces an elegant twist to these traditional outfits, with Omran explaining how the metallic threads combined with the shiny fabrics add an edgy look and feel. The collection embodies classic Ramadan looks, yet with a sophisticated and elegant touch, which showcase and align with the aesthetic of the current modern-day woman. “The Lady D-Lite bag with the embroidered crystals is versatile, and can also match any look,” she offers. “I would also suggest pairing the Lady D-Lite bag with the crystal D-Way sandals, where you can go from day to night with only one simple touch.” As the Saudi creative observes the pieces, she expresses her thoughts on achieving dreams and going after goals. “There are no limits to anyone’s potential. You can always dream big and push further.”
Read Next: Anya Taylor-Joy Takes Us Inside Dior’s Iconic and Newly Renovated 30 Avenue Montaigne Boutique
Originally published in the April 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

Saudi Arabia’s Aseel Omran Is Dior’s Very First Middle East Ambassador

Saudi Arabia’s Aseel Omran Is Dior’s Very First Middle East Ambassador

Photo: Hana Levan
French luxury label Dior has some exciting news to share in the region today. The much-loved brand has officially signed its very first ambassador from the Middle East, and the newest member of the Dior family is none other than Aseel Omran. The Saudi singer and actor, who is best known for her music, and her appearances in Gulf Stars and Heya wa Huwa, also shared the news with her 6 million followers on her official Instagram page with a first look. “I’m proud to share with you a partnership that is dear to my heart,” she wrote. “Today I’m officially the first @dior ambassador in the Middle East and I cannot begin to express my excitement level, Dior is a brand I was genuinely a big fan of growing up. I can’t wait to show you what the rest of the year holds.” Check out her post below.

With this move, Aseel Omran joins the likes of Natalie Portman, Jennifer Lawrence, Rihanna, Carla Bruni, Charlize Theron, Sharon Stone, and Monica Bellucci, all of whom have a special relationship with Dior.
In an official note, Dior also shared that “Aseel will be working closely with the brand across both womenswear and fine jewelry.” The exciting news comes just days after another favorite from the region—Lebanese-born, Dubai-based mother-of-three Karen Wazen—celebrated becoming the very first Middle Eastern to be signed on as an ambassador for Roberto Cavalli fragrances, appearing in the Italian fashion house’s latest campaign.

Inside Dior’s Iconic and Newly Renovated Flagship on Avenue Montaigne, Paris

Inside Dior’s Iconic and Newly Renovated Flagship on Avenue Montaigne, Paris

Photo: Adrien Dirand
Trust Dior to offer nothing less than the peak of luxury at 30 Montaigne, its iconic flagship, after shuttering for a two-year renovation. At the original address of Christian Dior’s first-ever boutique on Avenue Montaigne, the flagship will open its doors on March 6, functioning once again as the world’s biggest and top-selling Dior store.
The sprawling 10,000 square-meter space designed in collaboration with architect Peter Marino is home to a lot more than the French fashion house’s coveted clothing, jewelry, and beauty range. Visitors can journey through the storied maison’s history at a decked-out museum inspired by the traveling exhibition Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams. The gallery is one of the largest exhibition spaces dedicated to fashion in France, where visitors can take a closer look at Dior’s archival pieces created by its various creative directors after Christian Dior: Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, and Raf Simons.
Photo: Kristen Pelou
Pushing the boundaries of the services that can be offered at a standard flagship, the store marks Dior’s first foray into hospitality. La Suite Dior, also designed by Marino, is a private apartment within the boutique offering guests a number of perks including round-the-clock access to the store, personal shoppers, and chefs. 30 Montaigne also houses two eateries: a Monsieur Dior restaurant and a Dior pastry café, both run by renowned French chef Jean Imbert, and located in an atrium decorated with tall tropical trees and flowers.
Other highlights of the store include special spaces for beauty and knitwear, a personalization corner for bags, shoes, and eyewear, and three gardens.
Read Next: Learn All About John Galliano’s Iconic 15-Year Tenure at Dior in This New Coffee Table Book

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