Designers

Just Jouez! Jacquemus Links With Nike on Sensual Sportswear

Just Jouez! Jacquemus Links With Nike on Sensual Sportswear

Photo: Marco Maestri
Simon Porte Jacquemus’s shows in Hawaii, Provence, and Paris have included sport-centric pieces like scuba gear, hiking boots, and swimwear, but when his models walk the Paris runways in late June, they will be playing a whole new game, so to speak: Nearly three years in the making, Jacquemus’s debut collaboration with Nike marries the designer’s love of the outdoors and his body-​conscious aesthetic with Nike’s expertise in making some of the most technically advanced activewear in the world.
“Sport was always super important in the Jacquemus DNA,” says Jacquemus from his Paris office, noting that his 2014 and 2015 collections were grounded by sneakers. “But as Jacquemus grew, the Jacquemus girl changed – she got heels!” he continues, with a laugh. Still, something lingered in his mind. “I always said to myself, If one day I do a collaboration, it will be with Nike.”
Photo: Pablo di Prima
The American sportswear behemoth first connected with the designer in 2018 for a French campaign that featured an image of Jacquemus jumping for a header amid a throng that included the French national soccer team star Kylian Mbappé, and by the start of 2020, the ink was dry on a co-branded collaboration. Jacquemus took his first meeting at Nike’s Beaverton headquarters in Oregon in February of that year.
“Mind-blowing,” he says of days there that consisted of “buying vintage in a cool shop in the mornings, then going hiking, then having a meeting after passing by the swimming pool of the Nike campus” – a lifestyle that blended work with working out, mirroring Jacquemus’s own routine in Paris. (“I haven’t been to the pool today, and I haven’t been on a hike,” he admits when we speak on Zoom, “but I do a lot of sport every morning before coming to the studio.”)
Even two years of remote work – along with getting a puppy, Toutou, and becoming engaged to his longtime partner, French communications executive Marco Maestri (the two are planning an August wedding) – couldn’t slow Jacquemus’s roll, as ideas began to spring forth immediately. Jacquemus, an avid collector of Nike’s ACG (All Conditions Gear) line, wanted to bring that functionality to his own womenswear obsessions, like “late ’90s lace miniskirts, Lady Di’s sport looks, and the DNA of tennis.”
“I wanted to do something super light,” he says. Et voilà: The neutral-​toned womenswear pieces of this new collection marry Jacquemus’s effortlessness and ease with Nike’s technical prowess. Take a pair of pearl-white bike shorts – seemingly as prêt-à-porter as possible, until you realize that they are made without seams, from Nike’s specially engineered knit. That backless dress? It promises to work just as hard at the gym as it would at the club. “Super light, but super sensual,” says Jacquemus of the crux of his collection. “That was my first idea.”
For Nike, bringing that kind of French allure to sport was essential. “We always seek to work with collaborators that offer up something we don’t have as a brand,” says Jarrett Reynolds, Nike’s vice president of Catalyst Apparel Design, which fosters the brand’s more innovative partnerships. “Simon’s superpower is the sensuality of his design and his emotion… he can take the mundane and make it really special.”
Photo: Pablo di Prima
Among the special things in the 15-​piece collection are Humara sneakers with a tiny swoosh; a pleated skirt that calls to mind the on-court uniforms of Jacquemus’s favorite players, Emma Raducanu and Naomi Osaka; and a bucket hat for hikers and bikers of all genders. “I wanted to use this collection to speak to a larger audience,” Jacquemus says. “It was super important to me also for this to not be an elitist collaboration – to have something that everyone can wear.”
The partnership, which is ongoing, will only help Jacquemus expand his impact. Without divulging too much, he alludes to what’s next: “The collection will grow – maybe something more Nike is coming, and then something more in between.” Menswear seems like a must. But in the immediate future, look for Nike X Jacquemus in the backyards of Beaverton, on the hiking trails of Marseille – Simon’s favorites – and everywhere in between.
Maybe even the courts of the French Open, I ask? Jacquemus brightly smiles at the suggestion. “That would be cute!”
Photo: Pablo di Prima
Creative Direction by Simon Porte Jacquemus. 
Read Next: Virgil Abloh-Designed Louis Vuitton x Nike Air Force 1s Sell for US $25.3 Million at Sotheby’s
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Multi-Award Winning Designer Mohamed Benchellal: “My Style Is Influenced by Moroccan Extravagance”

Multi-Award Winning Designer Mohamed Benchellal: “My Style Is Influenced by Moroccan Extravagance”

Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Desiree Mattson
An air of eloquence and a sculptural line. Such are the traces of Benchellal. The creations of award-winning Moroccan-Dutch designer Mohamed Benchellal offer an entryway into the realm of timelessness, where women are commemorated as “empowered and divine.” Following his victory as winner of the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, the designer has been on a steep ascension that has since seen his namesake label prosper on Net-a-Porter and receive further awards, including the top prize for evening wear at the Fashion Trust Arabia Awards in 2021, and fashion innovator of the year at the 2022 Emigala Fashion Awards.
At Benchellal, a harmony resides between a measured technique and a spontaneity that is unique to his process. With a family name that evokes the ever-evolving (Benchellal is Arabic for “son of the waterfall”), the brand is an extension of the man behind it, who is an artist loyal to his intuition. “It’s already in my name,” Benchellal says. “Water is unpredictable, and so is my journey. I follow my own stream, always.” Voluminous silhouettes give way to a refined glamour in his creations, just as a fascination with the classics elevates the brand’s resonance. He is devoted to sustainability and uses self-taught techniques in his atelier to manipulate fabrics, while employing the use of existing materials for ecological integrity. What is today celebrated as ethical, was born of genuine practicality. After studying at Amsterdam Fashion Academy and launching his brand in 2015, Benchellal would make use of deadstock fabrics found in local marketplaces. “Sustainability was a necessity for me to survive as a designer,” he reflects. “It was a challenge to find all these fabrics that were forgotten and to create something luxurious with them. If I could get a certain fabric that was considered cheap and make it look expensive… That was when I realized, I could do this.” In a world where fast fashion has an astonishing environmental cost, Benchellal has contributed to the ongoing industry sustainability shift.
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Desiree Mattson
As the son of Moroccan parents who immigrated to the Netherlands in the late Sixties, Benchellal attributes his determination to his family. “Everyone who works in fashion knows it takes a lot of money to set something up. I didn’t know where to start at first, but I knew I came from hard-working parents. So I started small and developed from there.” His extensive knowledge of fabric, as well as his sensibility towards the craft itself, was nurtured from a young age, as his own grandfather had worked in textiles. “My grandparents had these intense industrial sewing machines in the house that would make noise. I was always fascinated to see how they worked with them. At one point, I decided to try it myself. I took a portable sewing machine up to my room and started to cut my clothes apart. I became obsessed with figuring out how a piece was made.” As much as the sewing machine had become a form of creative liberation for him at this stage, it was the encouragement of his family that imbued him with the self-assurance he manifests today. Benchellal reminisces, “Both of my grandfathers would make me feel special. They would take me aside and say, ‘You’re going to do something very big.’ I always felt motivated by that. They also knew how to manifest and work hard to get what they wanted. They built a good life for themselves, and this was a huge inspiration to me.” There is a cultural legacy that lingers in the fashion house. An attitude that informs both his wardrobe and personal manner. “When you grow up as a Moroccan child, your culture is woven into your identity. Now more than ever, I feel I embody the best of these two worlds. There is the warmth of my Moroccan heritage and the freedom and discovery of my European upbringing. My parents and grandparents taught me how to present myself. Not only to dress well – I even feel guilty if I wear sweatpants – but the idea that what you radiate is what you receive. There is no better place for hospitality than in Morocco.” It is the grandeur of Moroccan ensembles that he carries throughout his collections, as an aesthetic resonance that never leaves him. “My style is influenced by Moroccan extravagance. I do everything over-the-top and love creating dresses with volume. I’ve always seen Moroccans as elegant people, who are strong and beautiful. I grew up watching my aunts transform into these glamazons for weddings. There is nothing more glamorous than a kaftan, and to see that as a child, it stays with you. To me, it was glamour to the fullest.”
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Desiree Mattson

Benchellal creates a harmonious tension between body, shape, and comfort. However structured his garments may appear, there is also fluidity. Instead of contouring the body, he experiments with proportion, with an understanding of volume and cut not dissimilar to architecture. A recurring theme throughout his work is his reverence for women. In the early years of his creative experimentation, he showcased his designs on female friends, while today he collaborates with Hollywood actors and supermodels, including dressing Iris Apfel for her 100th birthday, and Billy Porter, Alicia Keys, Priyanka Chopra, and Sharon Stone for red carpet events. “These high-profile artists feel they have a responsibility to wear something sustainable, yet that is also new,” he recounts. “And that is also inspiring for me.” He adds, “My dresses are not just clothes, they are an event. I believe that women are the most beautiful creation. I want to sculpt around them. They are already divine, but I want to highlight that through my work. To put women on a pedestal. That is my mission when designing.”
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Desiree Mattson
His latest collection is a collaboration with the “catwalk contessa” herself, Dutch model Marpessa Hennink. “I remember being a little boy, seeing Marpessa in the magazines of the 80s and 90s. I was fascinated with her, and I would have never dreamed of designing for her. It came full circle.” A radiant Hennink is a contemporary elegante in Benchellal’s garments, with their symmetrical drapery or voluminous roses placed meticulously around her shoulders. “It is truly inspiring for me to see that there are young people out there that stay focused on their vision, undeterred by the daily distractions that social media dictates, and who stay refreshingly independent in a business based on conformity to hype,” Hennink shares. “I’m so grateful to have been introduced to Mohamed.”
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Desiree Mattson

Benchellal creates in a way that is particular to his vision. His process begins with the touch of a fabric, followed by an examination of its length. “When I get my hands on the material, this dictates my design. I feel that this is a much more sustainable approach to fashion; to produce from what is available.” While dressing Hennink, pieces were even finalized during the shoot itself. “I was sculpting them around her body, in the moment,” he explains. Hismanner of rejecting the habitual customs of the industry further attests to his singularity as a designer. “I work in a different way that suits me. And though at times it can be a struggle, you must believe in yourself, especially if you are taking a different route.” As a one-man-show of sorts, Benchellal takes the helm of his business proactively, fulfilling all tasks, from cutting to designing, distributing, and even PR, personally. “I do everything myself,” he explains. “It’s challenging, but it stays interesting that way.”
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Desiree Mattson
Perseverance is integral to success. It requires action, just as the awareness of bearing risks. In Benchellal’s journey, this manifests through the defiance of popular opinion, and his ability to pursue his own vision, regardless of what the industry may be accustomed to. “Success doesn’t happen overnight,” he affirms. “Working in the professional realm of fashion, you deal with a lot of advisors over the years. I didn’t agree with all of them, because I work in a way that doesn’t suit the old world of doing business. I was told that my way wasn’t the way of working. But I see myself as a designer of the new generation. In my kind of world, money should be the tool, not the goal. In that way, it is putting the planet before profit.” In prolonging his passion for the ethereal, his body of work promises to enchant, wherever inspiration may next lead him. When Benchellal designs something, it is for life. “I love my freedom. I could release 30 new dresses tomorrow or wait a whole year and only release a single dress. I am living in the moment, always breathing fashion. I think if you pin everything down and have all these plans, you can block yourself and all the beautiful things that can happen.”
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Desiree Mattson

Exclusive: How Chopard Created a Palme d’Or Trophy Studded With 100 Diamonds for Cannes Film Festival 2022

Exclusive: How Chopard Created a Palme d’Or Trophy Studded With 100 Diamonds for Cannes Film Festival 2022

Photo: Courtesy Chopard
In honor of the the 75th edition of the Cannes Film Festival, which coincides with the 25th anniversary of Chopard’s partnership with the event, the Swiss jeweler has put together a stunning new trophy for the annual event. The celebratory piece will see the Palme d’or rendered in gold, featuring two diamond-studded leaves, placed atop a rose quartz base.
Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
While one of the leaves will be studded with 75 diamonds, signifying the festival’s jubilee, and the other will be embedded with 25 diamonds, to signify 25 years of a committed relationship between Chopard and Cannes Film Festival. An appreciation of two in one, The Fairmined-certified 18-carat yellow gold Palme will not be placed on the traditional rock crystal cushion, but instead on a base made of rose quartz which alludes to the Greek mythology symbol of love.
The love story between Cannes Film Festival and Chopard began in 1997, when artistic director and co-president of Chopard, Caroline Scheufele left carrying a Palme d’Or to be reinvented after a meeting with then Festival President Pierre Viot. This gesture of appreciation from the maison highlights the theme chosen to celebrate the theme “Chopard Loves Cinema.”
Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
The Palme has been long used to honor the anniversaries of Cannes Film Festival. For the 70th anniversary, the iconic motif was seen filled with diamonds, and back in 2014, it was made for the very first time using Fairmined-certified ethical gold, making it the world’s first and only ethical film trophy. The trophy also held significance that year when Julia Ducournau became the first female director to receive a Palmefor her feature film titled Titane.
Below, see how Chopard’s sparkling new Palme d’Or trophy came to be for the 75th Cannes Film Festival.
Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Fixing the wax Palme in the plaster mold. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Pouring the Fairmined gold in the mold. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
The Palme after heating. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Reworking the shape of the Palme. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
The result after rounds of flame and regular polishing. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Setting the 100 diamonds into the Palme. Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
The final ressult, noe ready to be mounted onto a slab of rose quartz. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Read Next: These Two Egyptian Directors Have Been Invited to Cannes 2022’s Film Programmes

Dries Van Noten Celebrates the Summer With a Deliciously Vibrant Capsule Collection for Mytheresa.com

Dries Van Noten Celebrates the Summer With a Deliciously Vibrant Capsule Collection for Mytheresa.com

Photo: Courtesy Dries Van Noten
It seems like every time one thinks Dries Van Noten can’t be topped, the Belgian luxury brand ups the stakes in a novel way. The latest news? DVN has now partnered up with luxury online retailer Mytheresa.com to launch a capsule collection—both womenswear and menswear—which drops today.
“I am honored to launch this exclusive collection with Mytheresa, a treasured longstanding partner,” the designer said. “With this collection that amplifies the vivacity and strength of expert traditional crafts from across the globe, we seek to encourage joyful optimism and abandon and spark carefree fun.”
Photo: Courtesy Dries Van Noten
You need only glance through the latest line to agree that Mr Van Noten has hit the nail on the head with this launch. Joyful? Yes it is. Optimistic? Very much. Carefree? In copious amounts. With its jewel color palette, ikat-inspired patterns, and bursting blooms, the special summer capsule line is all about vibrance. While lightweight, flowy fabrics characterize the pieces for women, the menswear creations use similarly cheery prints and hues in camp-collar shirts and laidback trousers, all of which can be freely mixed and matched to create brand new looks. “[This collection] was a natural continuation of the spring/summer 2022 collection, which was very colorful, free, and festive. It was about [the Indian] Holi festival, it was about Burning Man, about really enjoying life, and especially enjoying that freedom we have been craving for such a long time,” he explains. “In addition, it was another opportunity to include that incredible craftsmanship from India,” he continues. “The people in India really needed the support, Covid-19 was very hard on India. In that way, for me, it was having the possibility to work with them and to see what they could do, that was really fantastic.”
Photo: Courtesy Dries Van Noten
To capture its essence, the collection was shot by Bruna Kazinoti to create an editorial story, which was directed by none other than Mytheresa’s Chief Creative Officer, Julian Paul. The exclusive line hasn’t just been limited to clothing, however. Enthusiastic shoppers will also find resort-ready accessories in the fresh Dries Van Noten drop, including striped sandals, floral tote and chest bags, bucket hats, sunglasses and edgy cuff bracelets. Below, the designer reveals more about his freshest creations, what inspires him, and much more.

What is the story behind the capsule collection, and what inspired it?
The idea was combining prints, colors, flowers… tropical flowers, leaves, sunsets… all the things that make you think about the perfect summer and the perfect summer outfit. That, mixed with handmade and hand embroidered fabrics, made completely using these beautiful techniques in celebration of Indian artistry.
Photo: Courtesy Dries Van Noten
As the third generation of a Belgian tailoring family, what are the biggest lessons you have learnt from your father and grandfather?
I inherited a sensibility for garment making, its traditions and rituals. They immersed me in the fashion business by making me accompany them to Paris or Milan on their many buying trips for collections. This was the spark behind my love of fashion and dressing. At that time, I knew that I was meant to create rather than sell, as I already had this unconditional passion for fabrics, which still drives me in my creative process today.

If you were a young designer starting out in the industry today, what advice would you give your younger self?
Persistence, patience, perseverance, and passion… Passion fuels creativity!
Photo: Courtesy Dries Van Noten
Your headquarters and studio are located on the swaying waters of the Antwerp harbor, you have a beautiful house in the countryside of Antwerp with a large flowering garden, and you are in the process of building a house in Italy. How does nature balance all the different aspects of your life? Do you have a different take on your new house in Italy, especially after times of Covid and lockdowns?
I think my love of gardening influences my designs for the sole reason that I absolutely love the aspect of the unknown with nature. You plant the seed and hopefully something beautiful will grow! It could be said that it’s the lack of control we have over the earth which intrigues me.
It is the same thing for my houses in Lier and in Italy. Working on this new home calms me down and it is something I look forward to every vacation. Far away from the metropolises where I can keep my feet on the ground and hands in the earth.

Photo: Courtesy Dries Van Noten
You are a passionate gardener. For previous collections, you combined your two passions and created floral prints using photographs of flowers you’d grown in your garden. Did your style of gardening change during the pandemic—and if so, can this be seen in your collections?
I love all colors, even the “strange” ones and it is always a challenge for me to use them, either in my collections or in my garden. When I’m gardening, I can say that in a certain way I’m building a collection, there are different trends and so many different shapes!
The enormity of the cloud that is Covid-19 was new and dark in our lives. It dictated a new way of working and a time for reflection. Our collective instinct was that our work needed to be very simple, fresh, and optimistic. I was seeking inspiration from a beauty devoid of nostalgia, an energetic and optimistic beauty.

What kind of flower did you choose for the exclusive capsule collection for Mytheresa?
Anemone, daisy, chrysanthemum, alstroemeria, anthurium. Flowers that stand for summer, fun, carelessness.
Photo: Courtesy Dries Van Noten
What are you most excited about when you think of post-Covid times?
Hugging people, seeing friends… the whole thing. Professionally, I believe our role is to inspire, excite and bring a spark of excellence to the lives of those we are lucky enough to dress. It’s difficult to predict what the future holds for fashion in general, yet the specifics of our motivation are crystal clear. All we can do is not lose sight of what it is that makes us happy in our endeavor. That said, I believe we must continue to distill our creative expression to the essential core and inspire.
What does luxury mean to you?
The heightened quality of what is not immediately necessary, existential.
If you weren’t into designing, what do you think your profession would have been?
Without any doubt, gardener! My other passion is gardening, it keeps my feet and hands in the ground. Flowers are a symbol of elegance and femininity, and when I take this into account, gardening for me is not so far from fashion, but more of a continuation.

Photo: Courtesy Dries Van Noten

Sarah Jessica Parker Shares the Stories Behind Her Best Met Gala Outfits

Sarah Jessica Parker Shares the Stories Behind Her Best Met Gala Outfits

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When it comes to the Met Gala, Sarah Jessica Parker has always understood the assignment. No matter what the theme or dress code is, the stylish star has consistently shown up to the annual event’s red carpet dressed to the nines. “Whenever I go to the Met, I don’t understand how everyone else didn’t spend 7 to 10 months working on it,” Parker tells Vogue. “The assignment is the theme, and you should interpret it. It should be labor-intensive and challenging.” In a new video, Parker sat down with Vogue to revisit some of the stories behind her memorable (and on-theme!) looks.
Parker’s first Met Gala was back in 1995 when she attended the “Haute Couture” theme in a black thrifted dress. Yet, as the years went on, the affair became much more theatrical and a spectacle—and so did her ensembles. Take 2006, when she attended the “Anglomania” exhibition with the late designer Alexander McQueen while wearing a tartan and tulle creation. “When I was invited, I said out loud, ‘I wish I could go with Lee’—we called him Lee,” Parker explains. “Everybody loved him because he was such a touching person. I have every pin that he dropped from his mouth and everything he cut off from our fittings in my possession still.”
Some highlights over the years for Parker included the glitzy, Studio 54-like Halston dress she wore to the 2010 “American Woman” exhibition. “Halston was so American,” says Parker.  She also fondly remembers the Oscar de la Renta gown she wore in 2014 for the Charles James exhibition. “This was the last public dress he ever built, to my knowledge. The [lattice train] idea came out of the boning and underpinnings of Charles James,” says Parker, who also asked if de la Renta would embroider his name onto the train in a dramatic scarlet hue. “He was so happy to have been talked into it,” says Parker. “He never would have done it on his own, because that would have been so immodest of him.”
Equally as iconic are the many dazzling headpieces she’s worn over the years. For 2013’s “Punk” theme, she wore a Giles Deacon dress with a Phillip Treacy mohawk headpiece. “I’m not going to say that it’s my favorite, but it’s pretty close,” says Parker of the look. “I had to sit on the floor [of the car] to get to the Met—because the headpiece did not fit if I sat in a seat.” For 2015’s “China: Through the Looking Glass” exhibition, she wore an SJP x H&M dress with another Phillip Treacy headpiece, this time crafted into a giant flame. “The headpiece had traveled from the U.K., and it arrived in customs, but it wasn’t in our possession—and it was Sunday,” remembers Parker. “We had no assurance it was going to be in our hands by Monday.” More recently, in 2018, she wore a Dolce & Gabbana gown for the “Heavenly Bodies” theme with a towering, ornate millinery accessory. “That headpiece was unbelievable and it was no heavier than [a pen,]” says Parker. “It was very Italian—marching through Naples with that on your head is not uncommon.”
Originally published in Vogue.com 
Read Next: Met Gala 2022 Dress Code, Hosts, Guests, and More: Everything To Know About Fashion’s Biggest Night

Jennifer Lopez Wore a Little Red Dress With Statement Boots for Date Night

Jennifer Lopez Wore a Little Red Dress With Statement Boots for Date Night

Photo: Getty
Jennifer Lopez has mastered many a dress code, but when it comes to dressing for date night, the pop superstar has it down to a fine art. As a newly-engaged woman who’s deeply in love – every outfit now includes that impressive pale green diamond ring – why wouldn’t she?
Spotted at celebrity favorite restaurant Craig’s in West Hollywood, the 52-year-old singer served up a head-turning look that was as sultry as it was glamorous. The ensemble comprised a bright red figure-hugging wool mini-dress by Saint Laurent, and a striking pair of black over-the-knee high-heeled Christian Louboutin boots. Lopez topped it all off in the chicest way, with a dainty black and white minaudière bag from Chanel’s Métiers d’Art 2018 collection.
For date night, it’s sometimes better to keep things simple. Pair a seductive minidress with towering boots to channel J Lo, throw on a classic shoulder bag and you’re good to go.
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk
Read Next: Jennifer Lopez Announces the Title and Premiere Date of Her Netflix Documentary

Eid al-Fitr 2022 Gift Guide: 11 Thoughtful Picks for Your Loved Ones

Eid al-Fitr 2022 Gift Guide: 11 Thoughtful Picks for Your Loved Ones

Vogue Arabia, January 2022. Photo: Paul Farnham
With Eid Al-Fitr 2022 coming up after a reflective month of Ramadan, it calls for the continued spirit of giving. Welcome your loved ones with a beautiful bouquet of flowers from Forever Rose London or Flowers.ae, and a selection of delectable desserts from Brix. Nothing says Eid like an elegant outfit and what better way to complete that than with Dior’s blush-toned bag and Kurt Geiger’s matte pink heels, which come with a sparkling finish?
Diptyque embraces the Oud scent reminiscent of households on a refreshing Eid day, while Cartier keeps in mind those with a love for Arabic coffee with a collection of cups laced with gold and its signature motif, the panther. Semsem brings out its elegant pieces of clothing to satisfy your kaftan needs this Eid, especially with their olive green draped number, which can easily be paired with Miu Miu’s dazzling princess-like heels for an Eid night out with family.

Below, take a closer look at 11 Eid al-Fitr gifts that are ideal for your family and friends.
Capsule collection, Christian Dior
Photo: Courtesy of Dior
Penthère de Cartier cups, Cartier
Photo: Courtesy of Cartier
Flower of Eternity necklace, Mouawad
Photo: Courtesy of Mouawad
Capsule collection, Off-White
Photo: Courtesy of Off-white
Bouquet, Flowers.ae
Photo: Courtesy of Flowers.ae
Capsule collection, Kurt Geiger
Photo: Courtesy of Kurt Geiger
Floral centerpiece, Forever Rose London
Photo: Courtesy of Forever Rose London
Kaftan, Semsem
Photo: Courtesy of Semsem
Capsule collection, Miu Miu
Photo: Courtesy of Miu Miu
Oud candle, Diptyque
Photo: Courtesy of Ounass
Limited-edition three-tier gift box, Brix
Photo: Courtesy of Brix
Read Next: Eid al-Fitr 2022 Gift Guide: 11 Presents for Anyone Who Loves Beauty, Makeup, Skincare and Fragrances

Louis Vuitton Hosted a Gala Dinner to Celebrate its Contribution to Venice’s Ca’ d’Oro’s Renovation

Louis Vuitton Hosted a Gala Dinner to Celebrate its Contribution to Venice’s Ca’ d’Oro’s Renovation

Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
As the long-awaited 59th Venice Biennale took off, Louis Vuitton held a gala dinner in the city, which was attended by some of the biggest names in the fashion and entertainment industries. The event celebrated the future renovation of the Galleria Giorgio Franchetti alla Ca’ d’Oro, which the French maison will contribute to, in partnership with the Venetian Heritage Foundation and star architect Peter Marino. Hosted by Daniele Ferrara of Veneto’s Regional Directorate for Museums, the dinner saw an emotional Marino giving his welcome speech, shedding a tear of joy over Louis Vuitton’s support to the Venetian Heritage Foundation.
Among the guests in attendance were Bollywood star Deepika Padukone, Isabelle Huppert, Tahar Rahim, Valeria Golino, Nicoletta Romanoff, Giorgia Tordini, Candela Pelizza, and Paolo Stella, who sported head-to-toe Louis Vuitton outfits. Padukone had an especially standout look with an elegant vest jacket and a shirt with a Victorian-inspired ruffle collar, which was paired with olive green bermuda shorts and black boots. The star held a Dauphine handbag with the Maisons’s jacquard ‘Since 1854’ textile to signify the year the French luxury house was founded.
Deepika Padukone. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Tahar Rahim. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Isabelle Huppert. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Nicoletta Romanoff. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Valeria Golino. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Candela Pelizza. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Giorgia Trodini. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Read Next: Everything to Know About the First Palestinian Art Exhibition at the Venice Biennale 2022

Hadia Ghaleb Launches a Modest Swimwear Line: “I Want To Highlight the Diversity and Beauty of Arab Women”

Hadia Ghaleb Launches a Modest Swimwear Line: “I Want To Highlight the Diversity and Beauty of Arab Women”

Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Brand

Dubai-based entrepreneur and fashion influencer Hadia Ghaleb is launching an inclusive swimwear line this week, Hadia Ghaleb Label. In an effort to bridge the gap between veiled and unveiled women through fashion, Ghaleb’s latest venture offers a collection of swimwear that can work for women of all backgrounds. Bringing together women of all cultures, religions, and lifestyles, the swimwear line practices inclusivity—something that is being called for within the fashion industry. “With the launch of Hadia Ghaleb Label, I hope to end the division of the swimwear market for veiled and unveiled women. The idea that we have separate stores feels outdated — in 2022, we need to embrace the uniqueness of each woman and ensure equal fashion choices for all,” she tells Vogue Arabia. 
Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Label
Drawing inspiration from vibrant summer colors in combination with the elegance Arab women are known for, Hadia Ghaleb Label gives women a chance to express themselves as fashionably as possible without worrying about their backgrounds during vacations. The label includes two swimwear sets that come in six different colors, alluding to the sea, sunsets, and beach. An extra dose of creativity comes in via the fact that Ghaleb’s pieces can be styled in several different ways and combinations, allowing the wearer to customize their look: Swimwear Ensemble, including a swimsuit top and scarf; and Swimwear Full Set, including swimsuit top, scarf, leggings, and sarong. The launch of the line will take place between May 3-6 with the digital presentation including prominent fashion influencers in the Middle East, including Hadia Ghaleb herself, Yusur Al-Khalidi, Maryam Al-Khalidi, Youmi, and Shouq.

Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Label
Ghaleb stresses on the need to reclaim the burkini trend and the negative connotations surrounding it. “The swimwear category for veiled women, also known as the burkini, often focuses only on practical functionality and doesn’t provide stylish or trendy solutions for the women who wear it,” she explains. The story of this launch is also a personal one for Ghaleb, who has witnessed the ostracization of her fellow veiled women. “Growing up, I saw a stigma around the burkini: Once, a friend of mine was denied entry into a place because she was wearing a burkini. I stood there helpless, feeling her pain but unable to change the situation. Hadia Ghaleb Label’s purpose is to change that perception, and designs of conservative swimwear, so no other woman will have to go through moments like this.”
Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Label
Though not always a conservative dresser herself, Ghaleb believes in her message of changing the stigma around veiled women’s fashion.  “The mission of Hadia Ghaleb Label is to uplift and empower women, no matter what their fashion or lifestyle choices are. By creating this swimwear line, I want to highlight the diversity and elegant beauty of Arab women by coming up with designs that will fit — and complement — all women.”
Photo: Courtesy of Hadia Ghaleb Label

15 Of Kim Kardashian’s Most Unforgettable Vintage Looks To Date

15 Of Kim Kardashian’s Most Unforgettable Vintage Looks To Date

It’s Kim Kardashian’s world and we’re all living in it. Whether at Paris Fashion Week decked out in couture, or swimsuit-clad on a sun lounger in Miami, we can always count on the entrepreneur and Balenciaga campaign star to blaze a trail when it comes to trends. But which ensembles resonate most with eagle-eyed fashion connoisseurs? Her jaw-dropping archive style moments, of course.
From her Stephen Sprouse spring/summer 1998 curve-skimming dress that Carmen Electra wore at the 1998 MTV Awards to the rare autumn/winter 1990 Azzedine Alaïa cheetah-print bodysuit equipped with matching gloves (allegedly valued at a whopping $10,000), Kim’s archive is a goldmine of iconic pieces. Alexander McQueen’s renowned spring/summer 2003 “Oyster dress”? Check. The sultry autumn/winter 1996 Gianni Versace number that Naomi Campbell famously wore on the runway? Absolutely.
Below, Kim’s most unforgettable vintage looks to date.
2016

In John Galliano spring/summer 2000.

Photo: Courtesy of Anthony Harvey

2018

In Jean Paul Gaultier spring/summer 1996.

Photo: Instagram.com

2018

In Versace spring/summer 1995.

Photo: Instagram.com

2018

In Versace autumn/winter 1997.

Photo: Courtesy of Roy Rochlin

2019

In Atelier Versace autumn/winter 1997.

Photo: Getty

2019

In Versace autumn/winter 1998.

Photo: Courtesy of Jean-Baptiste Lacroix

2019

In Versace autumn/winter 1991.

Photo: Instagram.com

2019

In Vivienne Westwood autumn/winter 1996.

Photo: Instagram.com

2019

In Azzedine Alaïa haute couture autumn/winter 1990.

Photo: Instagram.com

2019

In Versace autumn/winter 1996.

Photo: Instagram.com/kimkardashian

2019

In Thierry Mugler haute couture autumn/winter 1996.

Photo: Getty

2019

In John Galliano for Christian Dior autumn/winter 1997.

Photo: Courtesy of Presley Ann

2020

In Alexander McQueen spring/summer 2003.

Photo: Getty

2020

In Jean Paul Gaultier autumn/winter 1995.

Photo: Instagram.com/kimkardashian

2022

In Stephen Sprouse spring/summer 1998.

Photo: Instagram.com/kimkardashian

Read Next: Kim Kardashian’s Flaming Balenciaga Outfit is Setting The Internet Ablaze 

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