Art

This Brand New Fenty Collaboration Confuses Lipgloss with… Ketchup

This Brand New Fenty Collaboration Confuses Lipgloss with… Ketchup

Fenty Beauty’s latest launch is…ketchup? In an April Fool’s reminiscent release, the Rihanna-founded beauty brand has just dropped a collaboration with MSCHF, inspired by tomato ketchup. The MSCHF x Fenty Beauty Ketchup Or Makeup set presents six identical sachets, styled like individual sauce packages. Some contain ketchup, the others are filled with Fenty beauty’s best selling Gloss Bomb lip gloss in a cherry hue.
Retailing for US$25, the collector’s item is available at a New York hotdog stand pop-up, or online at KetchupOrMakeup.com. Reactions online have been mixed, with some Fenty fans agog at the surprise launch, while other social media commenters are confused by the left field collaboration.
Unfamiliar with MSCHF? The art collective specializes in off-kilter collabs – some real, some imaginary – with unexpected celebrities and brand names, creating sometimes bizarre pairings. MSCHF has previously released the Lil Nas x Nikes, Jimmy Fallon’s Gobstomper sneakers, mocked up Birkenstock sandals produced from a disassembled Hermes Birkin, and produced the headline grabbing Eat the Rich ice cream truck.

Saudi Interior Architect and Designer Nouf AlMoneef on Riyadh’s Progressive Cultural Landscape

Saudi Interior Architect and Designer Nouf AlMoneef on Riyadh’s Progressive Cultural Landscape

Nouf AlMoneef wearing a dress from Pinko, with bracelets by David Yurman. Vogue Arabia, June 2022. Photo: Tasneem AlSultan
Art, design, and culture
Nouf AlMoneef is part of the fabric of Saudi Arabia’s thriving art and cultural scene, as project manager of Noor Riyadh. She has a background in design, with a bachelor’s degree in interior design from Prince Sultan University in Riyadh and an MFA in interior architecture from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. “I have experience working in the Saudi private and public sectors, as well as running my own private studio,” she says.
Wearing a Norma Kamali dress with Dalood blazer. Vogue Arabia, June 2022. Photo: Tasneem AlSultan
Witnessing change
As a Saudi national, AlMoneef’s upbringing exposed her to her homeland’s progressing social scene, specifically regarding women’s affairs. “I grew up in Riyadh during at a time when the social norms were completely different from today. I witnessed and was part of the dramatic changes in society impacting womens’ status, as well as culture, arts, and entertainment,” she says. Today, AlMoneef works to further empower Riyadh’s rich cultural glories, including landmarks such as AlUla, which she considers her favorite cultural go-to. As she explores different destinations around the world, she dives deeper into her field and unlocks new interests along the way. “In my current job, which is related to art, I came to appreciate it and have collected art works from Saudi Arabia and all around the world,” she shares.
Nouf AlMoneef. Vogue Arabia, June 2022. Photo: Tasneem AlSultan
Life in color
When dressing and accessorizing, AlMoneef looks to brands both in the region and abroad to offer a pop of color to her look. A black Norma Kamali dress serves as a solid base for bright layers. A pair of fuchsia tie-up heels by The Attico and a slick of Gucci lipstick offer further edge, along with accessories like an Okhtein bag or David Yurman bangles. If an event or her mood calls for higher octane glamour, she will opt for a pussy bow sequin shirt.
Shoes by The Attico
Light and style
AlMoneef’s current mood board suggests accents of light art and fashion, hence her philosophy for style is “simplicity and elegance.” “Personal style to me is to add the colors, the accessories to match my own preferences and outgoing personality,” she says. While AlMoneef likes to keep it simple, her curiosity shines through with statement cuts and fabrics. She makes a case for unique abayas and trench coats as she flaunts them with accents of culture and modernity. “My abaya selections for the past couple of events and travels were from Nora Al Shaikh’s collection. Her abayas are authentic, and culture related with a modern twist.”
A bustling day
AlMoneef tunes into a playlist that throws her back to the 90s with music that sparks nostalgia for her childhood and charges her for the day. Her typical day starts with a quick workout at the gym, followed by a lively schedule that keeps her busy until 8pm. Sometimes her responsibilities expand beyond her government set working hours and require her presence at art-related sites in Riyadh. “I also attend art events related to my field of work. Therefore, managing time is essential,” she shares.
Mykonos
Wanderlust
From exploring Europe and Asia’s vast repositories of art to soaking up the Middle East’s charm, AlMoneef enjoys traveling to different parts of the world where she can fulfill her eye for design. Of course, nothing beats an itinerary of sightseeing and hopping to various museums and art galleries. “I particularly like the metropolitan cities and the historical places in Spain and Italy,” she says, while these photos were captured in Greece.
An Okhtein bag. Vogue Arabia, June 2022. Photo: Tasneem AlSultan
Power drive
After checking off her professional duties, AlMoneef devotes the last hours of her day to her family. Yet, despite her daily schedule of demanding responsibilities and activities, AlMoneef remains driven and charged by surrounding herself with positivity and appreciating the work of her colleagues. Whether at her studio, office, or an art event, AlMoneef manages to power through her role by following a motto of “taking it easy, and playing by the rules of the game.”
Originally published in the June 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia
Read Next: Meet the Saudi Women Helping the Kingdom’s Art Scene Get the World’s Attention

Discover Hubert de Givenchy’s Exceptional Collection of Furniture and Artworks Before its Auction

Discover Hubert de Givenchy’s Exceptional Collection of Furniture and Artworks Before its Auction

Ahead of its upcoming auction, Hubert de Givenchy’s exceptional collection of furniture and artworks from his two homes displays the meticulous eye and impeccable taste of the French couturier.
Hubert de Givenchy. Photo: Victor Skrebneski
“Fashion changes, but the 18th century style will endure, as it is of exceptional quality,” Hubert de Givenchy (1927-2018) once said, adding that it be kept light and fresh with contemporary art. The French couturier, who opened his fashion house in 1952, in Paris, and dressed the most elegant women of the late 20th century – among them Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Audrey Hepburn, Mona von Bismarck, and the Duchess of Windsor – had always been fascinated by art. He considered it an extension of his own work while also expressing himself through the decor of his own interiors. “I try to achieve harmony between architecture, decoration, and color,” he said. The exceptional furniture and art collection of Monsieur de Givenchy will now be auctioned by Christie’s next month, coinciding with the 70th anniversary of Monsieur de Givenchy’s first haute couture collection, presented in the French capital in 1952. The auction proceeds will go to the family.
At 17, de Givenchy – who was born in Beauvais into an aristocratic family of Venetian origin – moved to the capital, where he studied at the Beaux-Arts de Paris. Throughout his life, he was influenced by the creative legacy of his great-grandfather, who designed stage sets for the Paris Opera, and his grandfather, who was the administrator of the Beauvais Tapestry Factory as well as an avid collector. “My uncle started his collection as soon as he started making money from his fashion company,” explains James de Givenchy. “He was a true collector. He loved acquiring and surrounding himself with objects, furniture, and artworks. It was when he was the happiest.”
Hôtel d’Orrouer. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
Representing more than 1 200 lots, the fine arts and decorative pieces are drawn from two of Monsieur de Givenchy’s most elegant homes: the Hôtel d’Orrouer in Paris and the Château du Jonchet in the Loire Valley that the family still treasures. “Jonchet is our uncle’s most important chef d’oeuvre,” says James de Givenchy. “It is an enormous endeavor we are taking on. Hubert used to say, ‘It is not all to like a house, the house has to like you back.’ Le Jonchet loved him, and it was reciprocal. We hope we can continue being lovely to her.”
A broad variety of periods and styles characterize the pieces on sale, reflecting Hubert de Givenchy’s personal interests. Among them is the bronze Woman Walking (estimate on request) by the couturier’s friend and collaborator Alberto Giacometti, which was a gift to de Givenchy from the great American collector Bunny Mellon – a client who became a very close friend. Also included are Passage of the Migratory Bird (€2 500 000-3 500 000) by Joan Miró and Faun with a Spear (€1 500 000-2 000 000) by Pablo Picasso, as well as Bacchus (€1 500 000-2 500 000) attributed to François Girardon and a gilt bronze center table (€400 000-600 000) by Martin-Guillaume Biennais. Other objects and furniture that celebrate the golden age of French design in the 18th century are also available.
Château du Jonchet. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
“Hubert de Givenchy was fascinated by chairs of any sort and there must be over 100 in the sale,” notes Cécile Verdier, president of Christie’s France. “For Hubert de Givenchy, the chair is also a formidable medium for expressing himself through the choice of fabrics used to dress them. The finest leathers are said to have been embroidered by Monsieur de Givenchy’s glove makers, as on a series of Louis XV period armchairs à la Reine with leather and suede upholstery in three colors.” (Estimate €100 000-200 000 for the six armchairs). As part of a worldwide tour that offers a glimpse of the fashion designer’s world, some highlights from the collection were exhibited in Palm Beach in March and in New York and Los Angeles in April, followed by Hong Kong from May 21-26, before returning to Paris in June.
Monsieur de Givenchy never reached out to advisors to purchase art. He knew exactly what he wanted and gave priority to the Parisian antiquaires, such as Galerie Kugel, Marcel Bissey, Segoura, Alexander & Berendt, Galerie Didier, Aaron Aveline, and Galerie Michel Meyer. “He was a passionate ambassador for all the great French ateliers and craftsmen who have continued the spirit of creative excellence into our time,” adds Verdier. “In the decoration of his homes, Monsieur de Givenchy always considered the furniture in constant dialogue with the works of art, both ancient and modern. I believe this can be considered the common thread between all these fantastic pieces, chosen with a collector’s eye.”
Hôtel d’Orrouer. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
A jewelry designer, James de Givenchy has always considered his uncle to be his hero, describing him as handsome and elegant, soft-spoken and powerful. “With [my brother] Olivier, we would go and visit the couture house on Avenue George V with our mother to see him,” he remembers. “He would come out of the atelier and give us a kiss. The models would run through the hallways to the fitting room laughing and the music would be playing in the background. There were moments of bliss I will never forget.”
Throughout his adult life, James de Givenchy maintained a great relationship with his uncle, constantly learning from his love of beauty and knowledge of history, which imbues this unique collection. Every piece reveals a little bit more about who the couturier was, how he created, and the environments in which he evolved – including his homes. “This summer, the auctions are an opportunity to celebrate Hubert de Givenchy as one of the greatest ambassadors of French taste,” offers Charles Cator, deputy chairman of Christie’s international. “To tell his story of the art of living, collecting, and the elegance he sought to capture in all things.”
Check out some more of the remarkable pieces from Hubert de Givenchy’s collection below.
A first floor lounge in the Hôtel d’Orrouer in Paris. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
The Bunny Mellon bedroom at Château du Jonchet. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
The courtyard lounge in the Hôtel, featuring The Woman Walking by Alberto Giacometti. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
The Château’s Tree of Life bedroom. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
The Red bedroom in the Hôtel. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
François-Xavier Lalanne’s Oiseau de jardin II at the Château. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
A door knocker by Diego Giacometti. Photo: François Halard. Courtesy of Christie’s
Read Next: Remembering Hubert de Givenchy’s Best Looks
Originally published in the May 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

Everything to Know About the 10th Edition of Women’s Film Week in Amman

Everything to Know About the 10th Edition of Women’s Film Week in Amman

HRH Princess Basma bint Talal. Photo: Courtesy of Royal Film Commission
Under the esteemed patronage of HRH Princess Basma Bint Talal, a fellow UN Women Goodwill Ambassador, and the artistic direction of Ghada Saba, Women’s Film Week is set in motion for its 10th edition in Amman, Jordan. Honoring the occasion of Women’s History Month, the week of films will spotlight works by and/or about women.
Ghada Saba, artistic director of Women’s Film Week. Photo: Courtesy of Royal Film Commission
Women in cinema—from actors to producers and directors—will present their creative works in the span of five days from Tuesday, March 8 to Saturday, March 12, 2022 at the Rainbow Theatre, Jabal Amman, 1st Circle.
Addressing global issues such as climate changes, sustainability, gender equality, and the roles women play in these fields, the event places women at the forefront of change and peace and security makers of the world. This film week allows for the experience of story-telling which is central to the impact that the world of cinema has on discussing complex issues.
Listed below are the films to be showcased throughout the week:
Tuesday, March 8
Touching on subjects such as climate change, noise and air pollution, and waste management, these two films aim to bring awareness in hopes of decreasing waste.
• 6pm – Bikes Vs Cars• 8pm – Red Soil (Rouge)
Wednesday, March 9
This collection of films calls attention to gender equality in the workforce and the struggle of women in male-dominated industries. Sunú specifically addresses the preservation of culture under the threat of rural development.
• 6pm – A collection of short films such as Tuk-Tuk, Mundo, Women Flying Dreams, and Kano Botanic Gardens• 8pm – Sunú
Thursday, March 10
Losing Alaska fights to maintain cultures and traditions that face threat under the changing weather conditions while From the Kitchen to the Parliament touches on female activism.
• 6pm – Losing Alaska• 8pm- From the Kitchen to the Parliament
Friday, March 11
Presenting further intersectional politics is The Ants and the Grasshopper which highlights racial and gender discrimination in the fight for climate change. Johanna Donhal: Visionary of Feminism is a tribute to Johanna Donhal, one of the first European feminists.
• 6pm – The Ants and the Grasshopper•  8pm – Johanna Dohnal: Visionary of Feminism
Saturday, March 12
Toxic fallout from industrial developments mostly affects those in indigenous and black communities in There’s Something in the Water. The latter discusses justice in the court of judicial law and the extremities of so.
• 6pm – There’s Something in the Water• 8pm – Palazza Di Giustizia and Ordinary Justice
Read Next: Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Celebrate Women’s History Month with a Special Announcement

Jordanian Artist and Sculptor Mona Saudi Has Died at Age 76

Jordanian Artist and Sculptor Mona Saudi Has Died at Age 76

Mona Saudi
Mona Saudi, the renowned Jordanian artist and sculptor whose work became part of collections around the world, has died at age 76. The sad news was announced through the artist’s gallery on social media. “Very sad that Mona Saudi, the great Jordanian sculptor, left us tonight,” William Shabibi of Lawrie Shabibi gallery shared on Wednesday.

In grievance of her passing, her close friends and industry colleagues also shared a few words on their social media accounts. “Mona Saudi is no longer with us. Long live Mona Saudi, a great sculptor and beloved friend,” conveyed Palestinian artist and friend Samia Halaby on Instagram. “Rest in peace dear Mona, a pioneer and a force of nature, a true sculptor and artist,” shared President and Director of Sharjah Art Foundation Hoor Al-Qasimi, while Sheikha Lateefa Bint Maktoum, founder and director of Tashkeel, also offered her condolences via Instagram.
Some of Saudi’s works
Born in the capital of Jordan, Amman, in 1945, Saudi had studied sculpture at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Her work has been showcased globally in a number of countries including Dubai, London, and Paris. Presenting her work in multiple institutions such as Sharjah Art Foundation, British Museum in London, National Museum for women in the Arts in Washington D.C, and the Ministry of Culture in Cairo since she was as young as 18 years old, Saudi has left her cultural impact through her sculptures on the world.
Read Next: Desert X AlUla is Back: Everything to Know About the Art Exhibition’s Second Edition

Meet the Young Artist Collective Creating a Space for Muslim Women in the Industry

Meet the Young Artist Collective Creating a Space for Muslim Women in the Industry

A young artistic collective is rewriting the rulebook, challenging stereotypes while celebrating and nurturing genuine diversity – meet the Muslim Sisterhood.
Members of the Sisterhood’s collective: Rahma Mohamed, Farzana Ahmed, Yasmin Moeladi, Jasmin Abraham, Lamisa Khan (wearing coat, Saks Potts at Selfridges; top, Ester Manas at 50m; pants, Daily Paper; shoes, Axel Arigato), Hana Raage, Jeeba Marri, Zeinab Saleh (wearing suit, Filles A Papa; shoes, Axel Arigato; earrings, Aurum), Ikram Yassin. Photo: Malak Kabbani
Founded in 2017 by Zeinab Saleh, Lamisa Khan (both London based), and Sara Gulamali (who currently resides in Canada), Muslim Sisterhood began as a beautifully compiled photo series, capturing young Muslim women expressing themselves freely and authentically. Today, the collective has evolved to work within photography, fashion, film, publishing, and events, culminating in the launch of a zine last year.
Clockwise from top left: Jeeba Marri, Hana Raage, Farzana Ahmed, Jasmin Abraham. Photo: Malak Kabbani. Photo: Malak Kabbani
Khan wears jacket, Tokyo James. Lamisa wears jacket, Miló Maria; pearl necklace, Butler & Wilson. Photo: Malak Kabbani
“This was the first moment that our online community could come together and celebrate our work in real life,” they say. “It was so empowering to create a space that completely catered to our needs as Muslims. We had a mocktail bar and prayer space, and we commissioned Muslim florists, DJs, and panelists. Everything in our zine was produced, designed, and curated by a diverse and entirely Muslim female team.”

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Saleh wears dress, Toga; pants, Milo Maria; earrings, Aurum. Khan wears dress, Shrimps; vintage head scarf, Atika. Photo: Malak Kabbani
Khan wears coat, Susan Forrest; dress, Ashley Williams at The Lobby; necklace, Butler & Wilson; earrings, Aurum. Saleh wears shirt, Marr; corset, Ellie Misner; jeans, vintage Levi’s at Atika; jacket, Toga; earrings, Maeve. Photo: Malak Kabbani
Rejecting the prejudice that western narratives can project onto Muslim women, they explain their motivation stems from “a realization that if you want to see certain things and ideas come to fruition in modern media, it’s best to do it yourself.” Merging activism with championing creative talent from marginalized communities, they describe curating a medium where “young women, people of color, and Black women can prioritize their experiences,” and ultimately take ownership of their lives. Shining a light on what it means to be young and Muslim today, the Sisterhood’s network continues to swell as their work gains momentum. “So many things have led organically into the other,” they say. “Every part of our journey has been a source of pride and joy. We can build ideas for the future as much as we like but as this year has shown, ultimately Allah is the best of planners.”
Saleh wears top, dress, tights, shoes, Prada. Photo: Malak Kabbani
Read Next: 10 Inspiring Muslim Women We Should All Look Up To
Originally published in the October 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia

From Dolce & Gabbana to Aquazzura, Top International Designers Pay Homage to the Beauty of Saudi Arabia

From Dolce & Gabbana to Aquazzura, Top International Designers Pay Homage to the Beauty of Saudi Arabia

From the vivid patterns of Aseer to the lush greenery of the Al-Ahsa Oasis, Saudi Arabia is teeming with vibrant colors, culture, and heritage. Vogue Arabia partnered with the Saudi Tourism Authority in our special fourth anniversary issue, the Creativity Issue, and we enlisted the world’s most celebrated brands to pay homage to just that. Envisioning the Kingdom and some of its key landscapes through their artistic lens, the designers behind Dolce & Gabbana, Aquazzura, Giuseppe Zanotti, and Ashi Studio dreamt up bespoke sketches and illustrations exclusively for Vogue Arabia.
Read on below to find out how the diverse beauty of Saudi Arabia became a source of inspiration for these designers.

Inspiration: Taif
Left: Roses of Taif. Right: Art by Dolce & Gabbana
“Among all the flowers, the rose is the most elegant and romantic; synonymous with charm. We love the bold yet refined image that the rose symbolizes and we like to tell it through our collections. Taif, the city of roses, inspired us to create this set of elements that is a tribute to the beauty and values we would like to share.”– Dolce & Gabbana
Photo: Domen / Van De Velde
Inspiration: Aseer
Left: Patterns of Aseer. Right: Sketch by Edgardo Osorio
“The colors and patterns of Aseer are so modern and beautifully upbeat, they are exactly what I want to see right now. I loved mixing the floral arrangements with the graphic patterns in multicolor for a tribal-pop effect.”– Edgardo Osorio, Creative director of Aquazzura
Edgardo Osorio. Photo: Supplied
Inspiration: Al-Ahsa Oasis
Above: Al-Ahsa Oasis. Below: Sketch by Giuseppe Zanotti
“Al-Ahsa, the largest oasis in the world… Its greatness is just breathtaking. Places like this, an expression of the wonder of nature, are a great source of inspiration for me and remind me of how important it is to treasure and preserve them.”– Giuseppe Zanotti, President and creative director of Giuseppe Zanotti Spa
Giuseppe Zanotti. Photo: Supplied
Inspiration: Al Ula
Left: Al Ula. Right: Sketch by Ashi
“This look emulates the architectural grandeur, scale, and voluptuous curves of Al Ula. A walled city located along the road that carried the world’s treasures, from silk to spices, Al Ula has become a source of inspiration for the Kingdom; a timeless ambassador of the country’s culture, art, innovation, and talent, nestled in the desert.”– Ashi, couture designer
Ashi. Photo: Tom Munro
Read Next: The Mother Of Art: Meet Safeya Binzagr The Pioneer of Saudi’s Fine Art Movement

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