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Sheikh Hamdan Celebrates His Twins’ First Birthday by Sharing the Very First Photo of Their Faces

Sheikh Hamdan Celebrates His Twins’ First Birthday by Sharing the Very First Photo of Their Faces

Photo: Instagram.com/faz3
Since the birth of his twins, HH Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed has proved to be a doting father, often taking to Instagram to post precious moments of his time with his son and daughter. Now, on their first birthday, the Crown Prince of Dubai and Chairman of the Executive Council of Dubai has shared a heartwarming picture taken on the day of their birth, which also shows their faces for the first time.
The photo sees a smiling Sheikh Hamdan holding his newborns, one in each arm, and dressed in all white. “Feels like just yesterday this picture was taken. It’s been one year today,” wrote the royal. “Happy birthday Rashid & Shaikha, and to all the children of the world.”
HH Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE, with his grandchildren. Photo: Instagram.com/faz3
Previous photos shared by Sheikh Hamdan show him spending his time outdoors and sharing his love for animals, especially horses, with his children. While one post sees the children hanging out with their father and looking at giraffes, another saw them gently reaching out to horses. “Training and education should start early on,” the Crown Prince had captioned a photo taken with their Godolphin steed. “Rashid and Shaikha came to see Adayar & wish him the best!”

Below, take a look at more photos of Sheikh Hamdan with his children.
Photo: Instagram.com/faz3
Photo: Instagram.com/faz3
Photo: Instagram.com/faz3
Photo: Instagram.com/faz3
Photo: Instagram.com/faz3
Read Next: Sheikh Hamdan Launches Initiative to Reduce Plastic Waste By Using Refillable Water Stations

Meet the New Female CEOs Shaking up the Luxury Fashion Industry

Meet the New Female CEOs Shaking up the Luxury Fashion Industry

Fashion has long been made for women – and run by men. But a new cadre of female CEOs at luxury brands are shaking up the industry at the upper echelons, helping shape a more inclusive future.
Alison Loehnis, president of fashion and luxury at YOOX Net-a-Porter. Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Illustration: Maria West
At first glance, fashion is a female space. Women make up the majority of the front-facing retail workforce, they are the editors we see front row at fashion weeks and it’s female spend that accounts for more than two-thirds of clothing sales worldwide. Yet women seldom get a seat in the boardroom, as men continue to occupy the greater share of the global fashion industry’s top positions.
Gender disparity at executive levels has long been a universal stumbling block. For context, in finance, there’s just seven female chief executive officers leading companies in the Nasdaq-100 index. In tech, only 18% of chief information officer positions in 2019 were held by women, and among large non-profits, a 2018 report could find only 10 women in CEO roles.
Yet the number of women in senior management is increasing, growing to more than 30% globally. From 2020 to 2021, the proportion of women in leadership roles such as chief executive officer, chief financial officer, and chief information officer has increased, with Fortune Global 500 reporting a record high of 23 women CEOs in 2021, with the inclusion of six women of color. In politics, 2022 began with an increasing number of female heads of state, for example, with eight countries swearing in their first female head of government or head of state.
In fashion, however, results are varied. Among fashion companies in the Fortune Global 500, female representation – while not as inferior as in some sectors – amounted to about 24%. With a powerful array of female artistic directors, including Virginie Viard at Chanel, Maria Grazia Chiuri at Dior, and Sarah Burton at Alexander McQueen, more than half of major womenswear brands are still helmed, creatively, by men. In 2020, growth in female presence among CEOs in the apparel industry was promising, increasing by 95%, with more than 100 women stepping into the role of CEO, according to a report by data analytics firm Nextail. However, in its latest report, gender parity in CEO positions dropped by 39.3% in 2021, with fewer female CEOs joining fashion companies than the two years prior. This upended predictions during a year when luxury brands and retailers stood out for bringing in more than 80% new leaders than the previous. Though regrettable, Nextail suggests the backwards momentum is temporary, as businesses aim to “move out of their conservative phase and look for innovation and a new dynamism.”
Miuccia Prada, co-CEO of Prada
In luxury fashion and jewelry, several houses have long-standing appointments of women in top positions, including Michèle Huiban at Lanvin; Alison Loehnis, president of fashion and luxury at YOOX Net-a-Porter; Benedetta Petruzzo, general manager of Miu Miu; and, of course, Miuccia Prada, co-CEO of her family’s eponymous brand with Patrizio Bertelli. Currently, of LVMH’s 14-member executive committee, only two are women – Delphine Arnault, head of Louis Vuitton products, and Chantal Gaemperle, head of human resources and synergies. Of its eight watch and jewelry houses, only Repossi has a female CEO in Anne de Vergeron, and of its 14 fashion and leather goods houses, four have female CEOs at the helm: Lisa Montague at Loewe, Lisa Attia at Moynat, Sophie Brocart at Patou, and Séverine Merle at Celine. “Empathy, goodwill, and an abilityto listen are the traits we always associate with female leadership,” considers de Vergeron. “I think a women leader is someone smart enough to eradicate those standards. Sharing, educating, and learning always are, for me, the keys to access positions with leading roles while keeping an entrepreneurial mindset. Like the Repossi women, I keep looking forward to staying assertive and progressive.”
Repossi CEO Anne de Vergeron. Illustration: Maria West
At Kering, a long-term endeavor to appoint more women in executive roles has seen one of its six couture and leather goods houses with a female CEO – Francesca Bellettini at Saint Laurent – alongside a more promising high jewelry portfolio. Here, three of four houses have appointed female CEOs, including Boucheron’s Hélène Poulit-Duquesne, formerly international business and client development director and executive member for Cartier and the Richemont Group, who joined in 2015. “I never felt that being a woman was something that could hinder my career, and it turns out that I have always been mentored and promoted by men along the way,” explains Poulit- Duquesne. “What I truly believe is that men and women do not behave the same way in business, but that they contribute differently to the business and that we need both to work well. There are more women than men within my executive committee, and it is super important for me to have both sides, because that’s what gives the best.”
Francesca Bellettini, CEO at Saint Laurent
Research shows that companies with female leaders outperform those dominated by men. Evidence suggests that female leaders tend to be more collaborative than their male counterparts and more likely to engage the power of teams; often driven by a sense of purpose and more empathic. It has found that when women exhibit “typically male” leadership character traits – decisiveness, authority, assertion – they may be viewed as bossy, pushy, or aggressive. Yet when women exhibit “typically female” traits – kindness, nurturing, warmth – they may be perceived as pushovers or too soft.
Boucheron CEO Hélène Poulit-Duquesne. Illustration: Maria West
“We need to fuel the future of our brands and in order to do that, we need to fuel the success of our women,” Gaemperle told the New York Times, adding, “We can do better in terms of getting them into top jobs, but we’ve made a lot of progress already, much of which is to do with our goal of nurturing females, encouraging their ambitions, and facilitating their career paths across both product sectors and brands in order to train them, retain them, and eventually get them into CEO roles further down the line.”
In practice, what does a female leader look like? “First, it is crucial to have a vision. Then, energy and passion to inspire and engage the teams. Finally, kindness is important: being respectful, humble, empathetic, and friendly to everyone, no matter who they are. Kindness is not synonymous with weakness,” underlines Poulit-Duquesne. “What I also believe is that great leaders create a safety circle around their team members. A person who feels safe can express and be sure to be accepted as she or he will be happy at work, be engaged, and will deliver.”
For cognitive scientist Dr Therese Huston, founding director of what is now the Center for Faculty Development at Seattle University, the goal is having women occupy multiple leadership roles, where evidence shows smarter decisions are made. “In February, the Peterson Institute for International Economics analyzed the profits of 21 980 firms worldwide and found that companies where women held 30% of the top leadership roles earned 15% more, on average, than companies with no women on their boards or in their C-suites. With more female senior leaders, they found superior firm performance,” Huston explained in conversation with Forbes. “To be clear, the Peterson Institute didn’t find that having a female CEO led to greater profits. What predicted success was having multiple female leaders, not just one, in the top decision-making roles.”
Nadia Dhouib, general manager of Paco Rabanne. Illustration: Maria West
With regards to luxury fashion, it’s important to note that there is progress, too. This year alone, Tunisian-French Nadia Dhouib was appointed general manager of Paco Rabanne in March, following a long tenure as managing director of Galeries Lafayette Champs-Elysées. And with the announcement of Leena Nair as Global CEO of Chanel in January – making the British-Indian executive first-ever female and youngest CEO of the French brand – could fashion be taking strides to catch up yet? “What I hope to leave for future generations is my definition of personal success, which is about progressing, finding sense, and ultimately serenity. It goes through giving back to others, inspiring them in both personal and professional life, helping and supporting them to grow,” says Poulit-Duquesne. “For me, the fact that I ended up being CEO of Boucheron is only a means for self-fulfilment and for giving back. It is not about the status but more about the impact I can have on changing things while remaining true to myself. This is success to me.”
Chanel Global CEO Leena Nair
Read Next: UN Women’s Deputy Executive Director Anita Bhatia on Gender Equality: “It’s the Small Things That Add Up to the Big Things”
Originally published in the May 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

Egyptian-Irish Singer-Songwriter Aaria Tae Shares Her Style Ahead of Her First Single

Egyptian-Irish Singer-Songwriter Aaria Tae Shares Her Style Ahead of Her First Single

As she releases her first album, the Egyptian-Irish singer-songwriter shares her style.
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Nathalie Gordon
Life in-between
Egyptian-Irish singer-songwriter Aaria Tae has ventured across three unique cultures that instilled in her a sense of fluidity on the world map. Being born in Cairo, attending school in France, and living in London and Los Angeles have given Tae a different perspective to her surroundings and herself. “I eventually came to see how much of an advantage and privilege this experience was. It allowed me to explore aspects of myself I probably wouldn’t have otherwise,” she says.
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Nathalie Gordon
Soul bird
Tae is gearing up for the release of her first single this summer. Almost a decade of learning classical violin incited Tae to venture into different musical genres like hip hop, soul, and RnB, which remain at the top of her playlist with classics by Lucky Daye and Kendrick Lamar. As she reflects on her childhood that danced along to the tunes of Motown and disco classics, she finds herself also influenced by her multinationals. “Having spent a lot of time in France and Egypt I was also heavily influenced by both music cultures and artists,” Tae expresses.
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Nathalie Gordon
Day’s work
All it takes for Tae to kick-start her day is an oat or matcha latte from a coffee shop near her house in London called Over Under. Due to her busy schedule, she finds it difficult to work out, so she walks to her recording studio, where she spends the rest of her day. As for her time off, she loves meditating, disconnecting from technology while strolling through Hyde Park, having dinner with friends, and visiting her favorite side of the city, East London. When in Los Angeles, most of her time is spent in West Hollywood for its hangout spots and shopping sessions in Beverly Hills.
All or nothing
Tae’s “all or nothing” ethos came into focus at the age of five after seeing the video for Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.” “He is my biggest influence of all, and I was lucky enough to share a stage with him a few years later as an extra at an award ceremony,” she shares. As a young adult, Tae attained her university degree in London where she juggled a demanding lifestyle, slowly striding towards her dream with music. “I would go to work from 9am to 6pm then head to studio at 7pm until 4am, sleep four hours and start all over again,” she says.
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Nathalie Gordon
High fashion streetwear
Just like her music, Tae’s style stands out from a crowd, with inspirations dating to when the 80s met the urban 90s. She admires designs by Area, Schiaparelli, and Mugler for their exaggerated cuts and textures. “I like playful, I like bold, I like iconic,” she shares. Aside from her daring aesthetic, Tae appreciates a closet that gives room for a woman to freely maneuver through her lifestyle and different roles. She also finds herself traversing into slow fashion with vintage pieces and custom projects by fashion design students. A black monogram Gucci shoulder bag was her first self-bought designer piece.
Vogue Arabia, May 2022. Photo: Nathalie Gordon
The art of stacking
When life gives Tae jewelry, she stacks it, because “there’s no such thing as too much. If I could wear all the items I own together I would,” she says. She likes matching her favorite yellow gold jewelry with other custom-made pieces designed by jewelers she knows and trusts. Her fascination with jewelry extends to rarely parting from her gold and diamond lotus bangle by Rasha Mansour, piercings by Maria Tash and Dina Maghawry, and a small blue pendant that belonged to her grandmother. She also holds her Irish grandmother’s Victorian style pavé diamond ring, her mother’s sapphire ring with matching earrings, and her Egyptian grandmother’s emerald ring close to her heart.
Beauty is simplicity
Tae’s daytime skincare includes Estée Lauder DayWear tinted moisturizer, which gives her a healthy glow. Before bed, she mixes a little lavender oil or Dr. Barbara Sturm Hyaluronic Serum with Nivea Creme. “Someone I knew with very soft skin refused for years to tell me their secret. I later found out they put baby oil and talcum powder on wet skin straight out the shower, so I tried it and it works for me.”
Read Next: 6 Rising Female Moroccan Singers to Have on Your Radar
Originally published in the May 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia

Exclusive: How Chopard Created a Palme d’Or Trophy Studded With 100 Diamonds for Cannes Film Festival 2022

Exclusive: How Chopard Created a Palme d’Or Trophy Studded With 100 Diamonds for Cannes Film Festival 2022

Photo: Courtesy Chopard
In honor of the the 75th edition of the Cannes Film Festival, which coincides with the 25th anniversary of Chopard’s partnership with the event, the Swiss jeweler has put together a stunning new trophy for the annual event. The celebratory piece will see the Palme d’or rendered in gold, featuring two diamond-studded leaves, placed atop a rose quartz base.
Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
While one of the leaves will be studded with 75 diamonds, signifying the festival’s jubilee, and the other will be embedded with 25 diamonds, to signify 25 years of a committed relationship between Chopard and Cannes Film Festival. An appreciation of two in one, The Fairmined-certified 18-carat yellow gold Palme will not be placed on the traditional rock crystal cushion, but instead on a base made of rose quartz which alludes to the Greek mythology symbol of love.
The love story between Cannes Film Festival and Chopard began in 1997, when artistic director and co-president of Chopard, Caroline Scheufele left carrying a Palme d’Or to be reinvented after a meeting with then Festival President Pierre Viot. This gesture of appreciation from the maison highlights the theme chosen to celebrate the theme “Chopard Loves Cinema.”
Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
The Palme has been long used to honor the anniversaries of Cannes Film Festival. For the 70th anniversary, the iconic motif was seen filled with diamonds, and back in 2014, it was made for the very first time using Fairmined-certified ethical gold, making it the world’s first and only ethical film trophy. The trophy also held significance that year when Julia Ducournau became the first female director to receive a Palmefor her feature film titled Titane.
Below, see how Chopard’s sparkling new Palme d’Or trophy came to be for the 75th Cannes Film Festival.
Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Fixing the wax Palme in the plaster mold. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Pouring the Fairmined gold in the mold. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
The Palme after heating. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Reworking the shape of the Palme. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
The result after rounds of flame and regular polishing. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Setting the 100 diamonds into the Palme. Photo: Courtesy of Chopard
The final ressult, noe ready to be mounted onto a slab of rose quartz. Photo: Courtesy Chopard
Read Next: These Two Egyptian Directors Have Been Invited to Cannes 2022’s Film Programmes

Egyptian Soprano Farrah El-Dibany on Singing France’s National Anthem at Emmanuel Macron’s Re-Election

Egyptian Soprano Farrah El-Dibany on Singing France’s National Anthem at Emmanuel Macron’s Re-Election

El-Dibany on stage with the Macrons. Photo: Courtesy of Farrah El-Dibany
Egyptian mezzo-soprano Farrah El-Dibany was invited to perform the French national anthem ‘La Marseillaise’ at the celebration of the re-election of French president, Emmanuel Macron. The performance took place at the Champ de Mars near the Eiffel Tower on April 24 in Paris. “I was contacted by the production team behind Macron’s campaign on Saturday afternoon, asking if I could sing in the event that he won,” El-Dibany shared with Vogue Arabia. “I was in Geneva then, so I took the train Sunday morning, and as soon as I arrived, I went to the Champ de Mars to do the repetitions and to decide whether to perform with an orchestra or acapella. Monsieur and madame Macron took the decision that they preferred I sing La Marseillaise acapella.”
For the occasion, El-Dibany was dressed in a strapless metallic red gown from Gemy Maalouf’s Fall/Winter 2022-23 collection. Explaining how she came upon the selection of the dress, the singer said that she had previously seen the red number, and after the invitation, enquired whether it was available. “I immediately contacted Giorgia Viola for my look, who dressed me in Gemy Maalouf. She is a Lebanese designer whose clothes I wear whenever I can. Red was the perfect color, as the Macrons wore blue, and I was in red, and of course, it is one of the three colors of France’s flag. The dress was also validated by the Elysée.”
Photo: Getty
El-Dibany added that she was immensely moved by the invitation to perform. “What touched me the most is that I’m originally Egyptian, and not French, and for me to have the honor to be invited to sing the La Marseillaise to all of France was very moving,” she said. “President Macron thanked me warmly, but I thanked him in return, as it was such an honor for me.”
In 2005, El-Dibany entered the Arts Center of the Library of Alexandria and five years later moved to Berlin to venture into the realm of music. There, she attended the Hanns-Eislet Academy of Music and moved forward to obtain a master’s degree at the Berlin University of the Arts and a bachelor’s degree in architecture at Berlin’s Technische Universität. Hailing from Alexandria, Egypt, she became the first Arab and Egyptian opera singer to join the Academy of the National Opera in Paris in September of 2016. She has also received the prestigious Prix Lyrique de l’Arop award in 2019, marking her as the best opera singer at the hands of the Paris Opera.
Read Next: Louis Vuitton Hosted a Gala Dinner to Celebrate its Contribution to Venice’s Ca’ d’Oro’s Renovation

Eid al-Fitr 2022 Gift Guide: 11 Thoughtful Picks for Your Loved Ones

Eid al-Fitr 2022 Gift Guide: 11 Thoughtful Picks for Your Loved Ones

Vogue Arabia, January 2022. Photo: Paul Farnham
With Eid Al-Fitr 2022 coming up after a reflective month of Ramadan, it calls for the continued spirit of giving. Welcome your loved ones with a beautiful bouquet of flowers from Forever Rose London or Flowers.ae, and a selection of delectable desserts from Brix. Nothing says Eid like an elegant outfit and what better way to complete that than with Dior’s blush-toned bag and Kurt Geiger’s matte pink heels, which come with a sparkling finish?
Diptyque embraces the Oud scent reminiscent of households on a refreshing Eid day, while Cartier keeps in mind those with a love for Arabic coffee with a collection of cups laced with gold and its signature motif, the panther. Semsem brings out its elegant pieces of clothing to satisfy your kaftan needs this Eid, especially with their olive green draped number, which can easily be paired with Miu Miu’s dazzling princess-like heels for an Eid night out with family.

Below, take a closer look at 11 Eid al-Fitr gifts that are ideal for your family and friends.
Capsule collection, Christian Dior
Photo: Courtesy of Dior
Penthère de Cartier cups, Cartier
Photo: Courtesy of Cartier
Flower of Eternity necklace, Mouawad
Photo: Courtesy of Mouawad
Capsule collection, Off-White
Photo: Courtesy of Off-white
Bouquet, Flowers.ae
Photo: Courtesy of Flowers.ae
Capsule collection, Kurt Geiger
Photo: Courtesy of Kurt Geiger
Floral centerpiece, Forever Rose London
Photo: Courtesy of Forever Rose London
Kaftan, Semsem
Photo: Courtesy of Semsem
Capsule collection, Miu Miu
Photo: Courtesy of Miu Miu
Oud candle, Diptyque
Photo: Courtesy of Ounass
Limited-edition three-tier gift box, Brix
Photo: Courtesy of Brix
Read Next: Eid al-Fitr 2022 Gift Guide: 11 Presents for Anyone Who Loves Beauty, Makeup, Skincare and Fragrances

Louis Vuitton Hosted a Gala Dinner to Celebrate its Contribution to Venice’s Ca’ d’Oro’s Renovation

Louis Vuitton Hosted a Gala Dinner to Celebrate its Contribution to Venice’s Ca’ d’Oro’s Renovation

Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
As the long-awaited 59th Venice Biennale took off, Louis Vuitton held a gala dinner in the city, which was attended by some of the biggest names in the fashion and entertainment industries. The event celebrated the future renovation of the Galleria Giorgio Franchetti alla Ca’ d’Oro, which the French maison will contribute to, in partnership with the Venetian Heritage Foundation and star architect Peter Marino. Hosted by Daniele Ferrara of Veneto’s Regional Directorate for Museums, the dinner saw an emotional Marino giving his welcome speech, shedding a tear of joy over Louis Vuitton’s support to the Venetian Heritage Foundation.
Among the guests in attendance were Bollywood star Deepika Padukone, Isabelle Huppert, Tahar Rahim, Valeria Golino, Nicoletta Romanoff, Giorgia Tordini, Candela Pelizza, and Paolo Stella, who sported head-to-toe Louis Vuitton outfits. Padukone had an especially standout look with an elegant vest jacket and a shirt with a Victorian-inspired ruffle collar, which was paired with olive green bermuda shorts and black boots. The star held a Dauphine handbag with the Maisons’s jacquard ‘Since 1854’ textile to signify the year the French luxury house was founded.
Deepika Padukone. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Tahar Rahim. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Isabelle Huppert. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Nicoletta Romanoff. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Valeria Golino. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Candela Pelizza. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Giorgia Trodini. Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton
Read Next: Everything to Know About the First Palestinian Art Exhibition at the Venice Biennale 2022

You Can’t Miss This One-of-a-Kind Ramadan Bazaar in the Heart of Jeddah

You Can’t Miss This One-of-a-Kind Ramadan Bazaar in the Heart of Jeddah

Saudi designers Honayda Serafi and Nasiba Hafiz. Photo: Courtesy of Basamat
Saudi events agency Basamat has launched a unique and exciting Ramadan Bazaar in the historical area of Al Balad in Jeddah. From April 20-23, the event will spotlight 20 Saudi Arabian brands as well as international labels through activations and an exclusive runway show. Guests will have the opportunity to interact with designers in a showroom and purchase products as well as receive immersive experiences such as styling, hair and makeup masterclasses, exclusive shopping opportunities, and private suhoor events. Among the professional creatives who are a part of the Bazaar include celebrity hairstylist Nabil Harlow, stylist Lejenke, who has worked with Naomi Campbell, Beyoncé, and Kim Kardashian. 
Photo: Courtesy of Basamat
A few of the bespoke luxury events and activations allow guests to have their purchases customized to their liking, including makeup and nail stations. The event also features an installation pertaining to Saudi culture and destinations, wherein guests can learn about the Holy Month of Ramadan and the heritage of the Kingdom. Brands included within the Bazaar are Honayda, Nasiba Hafiz, Otkutyr fashion house, Galag, Kim’s Caffee, The Parlor Salon, and 28.g.
Below, find out more about the Bazaar from Aisha Almamy, founder of Basamat.
Aisha Almamy. Photo: Charl Marais
What made you want to launch the Bazaar during Ramadan?
I wanted to launch the Bazaar in Ramadan as it is the month when everyone in Saudi, Jeddah, and Mecca, gather and families meet each other. It’s the month of giving back, it’s the month where everyone is spiritual and is trying to be the best version of themselves.
Why did you pick Al Balad as the location?
The location of the Bazaar is in the heart of Jeddah, it’s a Unesco site, and nobody has ever done an event there and I was the first to have this opportunity. The location is in between historical houses where our roots come from, where our grandfathers and grandmothers used to live.
Photo: Courtesy of Basamat
Tell us more about the unique concept of the Bazaar.
We have around 20 brands from all the departments from high fashion, couture, streetwear, art, beauty, perfume, nail salon, styling, and accessories. We also have a beautiful runway for the fashion show. Every day is the participants’ day; they get a chance to show their clothes on the runway in the middle of these authentic houses. I picked and approached the brands I wanted to work with me. My event is a very niche and very high-end event, and my idea is to bring high fashion into the original Jeddah. They called Jeddah the Bride of the Red Sea and my idea was to have the shining ring as my Bazaar for that bride. The shape of the runway is in bright white that looks like a diamond surrounded by colorful lighting so with the drone you see it as a diamond surrounded by colorful gems.
We have booths for the designers to present their goods and collections, and we have the help center which is a non-profitable organization for special needs children and part of the income of this event is charity to help the kids. We also have Dar Al-Hikmah college, one of the few fashion and art universities, so we wanted to bring the girls there who study fashion and art to join our masterclasses for free. We have three masterclasses—three major experts we flew here, so we have one day for makeup, one day for styling, and one day for hair.
Photo: Courtesy of Basamat
What kind of an experience do you aim to offer the visitors of Bazaar?
It’s about quality and creating community and experience, as well as luxury. We have valet parking for all of our guests, we have a PA to welcome the guests at the entrance and guide them through the event and introduce the story behind each brand, as well as a bell boy to carry their purchases. We have a Basamat lounge for our VIP platinum guests and the celebrities that we invite.
The event was also made possible with the help of our sponsors, Porsche and Aston Martin. We have a green recycled Saudi water brand and we have Arbab Al Haraf, an art community as a sponsor. We also have Liquid, a Saudi production company, and the most amazing lighting guy, Hussein Gazaz, who is called the King of Lights in Jeddah, Half of the magic in this event was created by his lighting.
I studied fashion and film production and lived in Paris for nine years. I double-majored in film production and entrepreneurship at the American University of Paris and I lived in London. Now, I’m back in Saudi and I couldn’t be happier to feel that I am bringing all the knowledge and everything that I’ve learned to the heart of my city and country where my family used to live.
Read Next: Everything to Know About Saudi Arabia’s Inaugural Islamic Arts Biennale in 2023

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Visited Queen Elizabeth in the UK for the First Time in Two Years

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Visited Queen Elizabeth in the UK for the First Time in Two Years

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry. Photo: Getty
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have paid a visit to Queen Elizabeth at Windsor Castle in the UK on their way to the fifth Invictus Games. It marks the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s first visit since departing from the UK to California in March 2020. The Queen, now 95-years-old, and recently recovered from Covid-19, is facing mobility issues and has pulled out of several upcoming events.
Markle and Harry are making their way to Europe for the fifth Invictus Games taking place in the Dutch city of The Hague from this weekend onwards. Prior to returning together for the event, Prince Harry has previously visited twice on his own for two occasions: the funeral of his grandfather, Prince Philip, in April 2021, and once more in July 2021 to unveil a statue of his mother, Princess Diana, with brother Prince William.
Meghan Markle and Queen Elizabeth II on their royal engagement trip to Chester, England in 2018. Photo: Instagram.com/theroyalfamily
Launched by the Duke of Sussex for wounded service members and veterans, the Invictus Games will take place from April 16 to 22, 2022. Originally scheduled to take place in 2020, but postponed to this year due to the pandemic, the games will see Markle join the Duke on occasion too. This is not the Duchess of Sussex’s first experience at the event, having joined Prince Harry at the Toronto Games in 2017, the couple’s first official appearance together, and for the Sydney Games in 2018.
Read Next: Meghan Markle Pens an Emotional Letter on the End of a Royal Patronage and the Death of Her Friend

Pictures: Bottega Veneta Celebrates Emerging Middle Eastern Creatives With a Three-Night Majlis in Dubai

Pictures: Bottega Veneta Celebrates Emerging Middle Eastern Creatives With a Three-Night Majlis in Dubai

Carl Gerges. Photo: Augustine Paredes of Seeing Things
Amid the series of star-studded Ramadan events hosted by international brands this month, Bottega Veneta launched its version of a majlis for not one, but three nights. Aptly named ‘The Square’, the structured space was conceptualized by Lebanese architect and musician Carl Gerges, one of the many talents celebrated by the Italian fashion house’s cultural exchange over April 12, 13, and 14, 2022. “The Square Dubai connects the two parts of who I am, music and architecture,” says Gerges. “My input entails linking design, music, and gatherings as a means to push forward a community of artists and thinkers in an architectural intervention.”
Photo: Courtesy of Bottega Veneta
The custom place, rendered in signature Bottega Veneta green, invited small handpicked groups of guests from the local art, music, and fashion industries each night to discover the work of the Middle East’s emerging creatives. “To embrace an emphasis on sharing and togetherness at the time of Ramadan,” Bottega Veneta hosted film screenings, musical performances, storytelling sessions, poetry recitals, and offered cuisines by a number of local talents to its visitors.
Shaima Al Tamimi. Photo: Augustine Paredes of Seeing Things
Yemeni and East-African Shaima Al Tamimi showcased her short film Don’t Get Too Comfortable, which was also screened at La Biennale di Venezia, and nominated for the Orrizonti Award. The film is a letter to her late grandfather, contemplating their pasts and future as Arabs in the diaspora.
Asma Elbadawi. Photo: Augustine Paredes of Seeing Things
Next, poetry was read by Asma Al Badawi, the Sudanese-British spoken word poet known for advocating for inclusivity and diversity in women’s sports, and Mustafa the Poet, the Canadian songwriter whose genre-defying work explores his identity as a Black Muslim artist. Guests were also served delectable dishes made by Solemann Haddad, the chef and co-owner of Dubai’s newly opened restaurant, Moonrise.
Mustafa the Poet. Photo: Augustine Paredes of Seeing Things
After its debut in Dubai, the concept of The Square will travel to a few different cities on varying scales to foster local communities worldwide. According to the brand, The Square’s second installment will take place in Tokyo at the end of April.
Samer Doumet. Photo: Augustine Paredes of Seeing Things
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