Bella Hadid

Fashion Trust Arabia Awards 2022: Everything you Missed From the Spectacular Evening in Doha

Fashion Trust Arabia Awards 2022: Everything you Missed From the Spectacular Evening in Doha

Winners, judges and presenters including Charaf Tajer, Imran Amed, Michele Lamy, Artsi Ifrach, Sheikha Al-Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, Saif Mahdhi, Akbar Al Baker, Gherardo Felloni, Fashion Trust Arabia Co-Founder and Co-Chair Tania Fares, Lorraine Schwartz, Giancarlo Giammetti, Huda Kattan, Jodie Turner-Smith, Eilaf Osman and Fatma Mostafa attend the Fashion Trust Arabia Prize 2022 Awards Ceremony at The National Museum of Qatar on October 26, 2022 in Doha, Qatar. Photo: Getty
Last night, all eyes were on Doha, Qatar, where the iconic National Museum of Qatar lit up for the 2022 edition of the Fashion Trust Arabia Awards Ceremony. Held under the patronage of HH Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser as honorary chair, and co-chairs HE Sheikha Al Mayassa Bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani and Tania Fares, FTA has become one of the region’s most celebrated events in the realm of fashion, and this year’s ceremony was bigger, brighter, and more exciting than any other in its history. Find out more about it below.

Bella Hadid, Huda Kattan, Janet Jackson, and many more attended the event

The FTA awards brought together not just a slew of celebrities from the region, but also some much-loved international faces. There to congratulate the newest era of talented designers were the likes of Bella Hadid, Paula Abdul, Janet Jackson, Naomi Campbell, Ed Westwick, Olivia Culpo and Poppy Delevingne. While Hadid walked into the venue with father Mohamed Hadid dressed in head-to-toe Alaïa, Jackson made a strong statement last night in a flawlessly tailored tuxedo, and Campbell look resplendent in a sparkling pastel gown. Also in attendance were favorites of the region including Yasmine Sabri, Balqees, Karen Wazen, Tara Emad, Dana Hourani, Dima Sheikhly, Salma Abu Deif, Elyanna, and power duo Huda and Mona Kattan—the former of which also took home the prize for Entrepreneur of the Year. Singer FKA Twigs also made a very special appearance via Miu Miu, treating guests to a heartfelt musical performance.
All the fashion heavyweights spotted at the 2022 FTA ceremony

What’s a celebration without some of the best in the business sitting front row? Last night’s awards ceremony was graced with more than just a few iconic fashion personalities, from Valentino’s Pier Paolo Piccioli, to Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing, Vogue Arabia editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut, Imran Amed of Business of Fashion, Vogue Japan editor-at-large Anna Dello Russo, Vogue global contributing fashion editor-at-large Gabriella Karefa-Johnson, and Michèle Lamy. Also in attendance were models Ikram Abdi,  Neelam Gill, and Karolina Kurkova.
Meet the Fashion Trust Arabia 2022 winners

Along with incredible red carpet looks, last night also saw some incredible talent taking home much-deserved awards. Morocco’s Aartsi Ifrach took home the award for Best Eevening wear, Siham and Sarah of Saudi Arabia won the award for Best Ready-to-Wear, and Fatma Mostafa of Egypt took home the award for Best Jewelry. Eilaf Osman celebrated her Sudanese roots as she was awarded the Best Accessories title, and Kazna Asker shared the stage with Paula Abdul and Youssra while accepting the Franca Sozzani Debut Talent award. As for the winner in the Guest Country category, the win went to Burc Akyol of Turkey. Huda Kattan had her big moment winning Entrepreneur of the Year, while Valentino Garavani, who sadly could not attend in person, won this year’s Lifetime Achievement award.
Who was at the Miu Miu Club after-party?
The star-studded evening came to a close at Doha’s B Lounge, which transformed into the Miu Miu Club last night. There to celebrate the evening were some of the best dressed names in the region, many of whom made sure to change up their look and attend in their favorite Miu Miu ensembles. While Karen Wazen, Olivia Culpo, Ikram Abdi and Popppy Delevingne played with embellishment, Salma Abu Deif, Tina Leung, and Chriselle Lim opted for soothing hues. Check out some of the best looks and moments from the evening below.

Yousef Akbar and Fashion Trust Arabia Co-Founder and Co-Chair Tania Fares. Photo: Getty
Ikram Abdi Omar. Photo: Getty
Dana Hourani. Photo: Getty
Dima Al Sheikhly Photo: Getty
Abdel El Tayeb Photo: Getty
Noor Tagouri. Photo: Getty
Nathalie Fanj. Photo: Getty
Imran Amed. Photo: Getty
Chriselle Lim. Photo: Getty
Anna Dello Russo. Photo: Getty
Tina Leung. Photo: Getty
Elyanna. Photo: Getty
Olivier Rousteing. Photo: Getty
Abdulla Al Abdulla. Photo: Getty
Binbella. Photo: Getty
Salma Abu Deif. Photo: Getty
Gaia Repossi. Photo: Getty
Olivia Culpo. Photo: Getty
Michele Lamy. Photo: Getty
Mohammed Al Turki. Photo: Getty
Hadban twins. Photo: Getty
Haneen Al Saify. Photo: Getty
Poppy Delevingne. Photo: Getty
Karen Wazen. Photo: Getty
Karolina Kurkova. Photo: Getty

Bella Hadid’s Coperni Spray-On Dress Won Fashion Week—But is it Really Sustainable?

Bella Hadid’s Coperni Spray-On Dress Won Fashion Week—But is it Really Sustainable?

Photo: Getty
It won Paris Fashion Week. But is the spray-on dress Bella Hadid wore on Coperni’s runway sustainable? The short answer is no.
Manel Torres, who created the spray-on material and the company behind it, Fabrican, in 2003, says it can be washed and re-worn, or put back in the can and resprayed later. Yet, while it may be reusable, spraying fabric from a can likely uses more energy and chemicals and produces more waste compared to virtually any other fabric used to make a garment. And, while it looked cool in real-time on the runway, it’s hard to imagine anyone spraying on their clothing at home (the fumes from Fabrican filled Coperni’s venue, which alone could deter customers) let alone repackaging and reusing it.
“They’re taking aerosol, which is the least efficient, most problematic delivery device, and bringing it into an industry where it didn’t exist,” says Martin Mulvihill, a chemist and founding partner at investment firm Safer Made. Even though the cans are metal, aerosol cans are typically not recyclable: the pressurization makes them too risky for most recycling centres to accept. And Mulvihill says that Fabrican appears to have prioritized sustainability in developing its technology and avoids some of the most concerning chemicals used in many aerosol products, but that matters little in the context of fashion.
Since its runway debut in Paris, fashion has talked about the technology more as an innovation than a sustainability accomplishment. Torres concedes that home use is not practical — you’d need someone on hand to spray your back, for instance — and that he sees its use more applicable in industrial settings, which would leave it up to the industry to create infrastructure for collection and refill, a feat it is still far from accomplishing for even the most common fibres like polyester and cotton. He also says it gives fashion another material to work with, rather than to replace any particular fabric it already uses.
Fabrican wasn’t used in Paris to sell an overt sustainability message, but to create a moment, although Coperni co-founder and creative director Sebastién Meyer hinted at the potential of the innovation in an interview with Vogue Business ahead of the show: “It’s our duty as designers to try new things and show a possible future. We’re not going to make money on this, but it’s a beautiful moment — an experience that creates emotion,” he said at the time. (Coperni did not respond to requests for comment for this story.)
Nevertheless, fashion has made many advances in sustainable materials since Fabrican was developed close to two decades ago. These range from technological innovations such as textile recycling and low-water dyeing systems, to shifts in attitude among both consumers and companies. When Fabrican was first released in 2003, few fashion companies were talking about sustainability at all; today, it’s rare for a fashion company to not have a sustainability strategy published on its website.
What the dress ultimately represents is a missed opportunity. During a fashion month that was largely devoid of loud, in-your-face calls for — or demonstrations of — sustainability on the runway, the spray-on dress took up more space in conversations about not only material innovation, but also about fashion’s priorities overall, than any of the actual alternative materials and other sustainability initiatives that many luxury brands are experimenting with. Despite major brands having significant sustainability strategies or climate goals in place, the issue doesn’t usually appear on the runway — leaving some to question how urgent a priority it is for the industry.
“It is fascinating to see how the Coperni spray-on dress crossed the borders of the fashion press and managed to become a global, albeit brief, phenomenon. Catwalks seldom achieve this,” says sustainability-focused influencer Doina Ciobanu. “What it does is remind those working on [sustainability] that the products that have a groundbreaking but attractive story to tell will perform the best. From a communication perspective, this presents an interesting opportunity to learn how to engage with the mainstream audience.”
Calls are growing, from the UN and some advocates and influencers, for fashion to use its influence to promote sustainability as a priority and not just a practice in their supply chain. The Paris Fashion Week dress served as a reminder that for the most part, the industry isn’t really embracing that potential — one consequence of which, according to analysts, is to perpetuate the disconnect between customers saying sustainability is a priority and not necessarily demonstrating that in their purchases because, in part, brands are not helping to make it the desirable choice in the moment.
“Fashion, and luxury fashion even more so, is associated from a consumer standpoint with dreams, creativity, innovation and beauty. Until these concepts are part of the sustainable proposition, it will be challenging for consumers to feel engaged and show honest interest in sustainability,” says Maximiliano Nicolelli, managing partner and founder of Milan-based Hydra Consultancy. “It is important for brands to ensure that all consumer touchpoints — store, products, campaigns, digital, etc. — deliver enough relevance and excitement [relating to their sustainability practices] in order to connect to consumers in a meaningful way.”
For all the progress the industry has made, what’s still missing is an understanding that true sustainability has to be part and parcel of fashion’s overall existence. Samata Pattinson, CEO of Red Carpet Green Dress, says it boils down to one question for brands: “Why are you doing this thing called sustainability?” she says. “Are you doing it because you recognise that fashion craves innovation and excitement, or because you realise sustainability is crucial for the survival of our industry [and] our planet? Because both are right.”
The most important work — reducing emissions, for example — is not going to generate the same headlines as a dress being sprayed on an almost-naked Bella Hadid, so it’s fashion’s responsibility to find a way to make it appealing and exciting.
“It is frustrating that environmental achievement doesn’t attract the same level of engagement and attention. But the fault for that, if there is any, doesn’t lie with Coperni. Rather, it would lay with brands who have failed to message their ecological and sustainability credentials in a way that resonates — and, even more so, with those who have blunted the impact of sustainable achievements by abusing the term,” says Ciobanu. “Sustainability-related content should still have, at its core, what a fashion lover is there for in the first place — fashion.”
Originally published in Voguebusiness.com

Bella Hadid Gives Us a Lesson in Glam Evening Wear in a Gold Sequin Dress

Bella Hadid Gives Us a Lesson in Glam Evening Wear in a Gold Sequin Dress

Photo: Getty
Bella Hadid made a memorable appearance at the 16th annual Golden Heart Awards celebration organized in collaboration with Michael Kors in New York City on Monday, October 17. On the red carpet, The model appeared in a silhouette that could have been designed by Adrian, the 1950’s costume designer who created the very definition of Hollywood glamour. Check it out below.

Bella Hadid was all about the glamorous life in her Michael Kors dress
Photo: Getty
Bella Hadid rekindled the magic of Old Hollywood for her night out. For the event, she was accompanied by partner Marc Kalman, and her mother Yolanda Hadid. Bella wore a golden Michael Kors dress from the spring/summer 2023 collection. The glamorous evening dress came with a plunging neckline that grazed over her hips, giving her the perfect dose of sensuality while still remaining true to the elegance of the ’50s. The dress was obviously eye-catching, and the model paired it with golden Dsquared2 sandals and subtle earrings.
As for her beauty look for the night out, Bella Hadid kept things sleek with a neat side-parted bun and gold-tinted makeup that complemented her dress. A hint of bronzer on the cheeks and a creme caramel lip color completed her look. If you’re planning a special soireé this winter, a sparkling dress like hers may just be the perfect outfit for the occasion.
Originally published in Vogue.fr

Pre-Loved Pieces are Having Major Red Carpet Moments, Courtesy of the World’s Biggest Fashion Stars

Pre-Loved Pieces are Having Major Red Carpet Moments, Courtesy of the World’s Biggest Fashion Stars

Pre-loved pieces emerge front and center on the red carpet, as stars bask in the unique spotlight of old-world glamour.
Marilyn Monroe in the bespoke Jean Louis dress Kim Kardashian would controversially borrow for the 2022 Met Gala
The 444 million-and-counting multi-platform viewers of this year’s Met Gala gave a collective gasp when Kim Kardashian arrived on the red carpet in Marilyn Monroe’s Jean Louis crystal embroidered dress.
Originally worn by the blonde bombshell herself in 1962 at Madison Square Garden when she famously serenaded President Kennedy with a very sultry rendition of Happy Birthday, Monroe had been sewn into the bespoke piece that night to achieve a seamless fit. Purchased by pop culture archivists Ripley’s Believe It or Not! for US$4.8 million in 2016 — making it the most expensive dress in the world — this very fabric of history is usually kept in a temperature and light-controlled vault in their Orlando museum and gallery. All of which contributed to making Kardashian’s modern ‘Mr President’ moment such a polarizing affair for the Internet, with many questioning why the delicate dress, made from sheer and flesh-colored marquisette fabric and set with 2,500 rhinestones, had been taken out of the archives. Dubai-based Joe Challita, couturier and fashion history enthusiast weighed in, stating, “Kim Kardashian acquiring Marilyn’s dress for the Met Gala, in my opinion, was not a move for sustainability but a move to acquire its iconic status. That dress had its moment through Marilyn. It has already been in the limelight, and it is still etched in our memories today.” Increasingly, vintage dresses are appearing more and more on the red carpet, but the motives behind the trend appear less grounded in sustainability than an opportunity to achieve an away-from-the-pack look that’s very modernity is entrenched in the past.
A vintage Dior dress Bella Hadid paid homage to at the Prince’s Trust Gala 2022
Dani Levi, Kardashian’s fashion stylist, expresses that her reasons for sourcing vintage are related to creative freedom, declaring, “A circular fashion system allows for more possibilities to express what I want to say without being bounded. I don’t want to be limited by what designers or trend forecasters think is relevant this season. I feel we stylists are artists and should be more original by letting our personal vibes, environment, and likes play a part in our aesthetic and work. Archive fashion gives us endless ideas.” Kardashian has been donning vintage since 2016, from Thierry Mugler to Vivienne Westwood, each piece delivering new iconic moments in fashion, creating conversations around the importance of historical couture.
Zendaya wears vintage Balmain at this year’s NAACP Image Awards
The idea that vintage frees women from the constraints of trends is also expressed by Bella Hadid. The Palestinian-Dutch model made an old-glamor statement on the red carpet when she wore a 1950s Dior gown to the Prince’s Trust Gala in New York, in April. It did not end there. The Cannes Festival red carpet saw her wearing not one, but two Versace gowns plucked from the maison’s archives — confirming her position as a vanguard for the vintage trend. Law Roach styled Hadid’s striking looks and is a huge supporter of vintage couture. He recently commented on actress Zendaya’s Bob Mackie moment, “Vintage and archival dressing isn’t a trend for me, it’s what led me to this career and will always be my first option when possible.”
In the region, fashion purveyor Sheikha Dana Al Khalifa is vocal in her praise for vintage couture and jewelry, revealing, “Cherie Balch of Shrimpton Couture taught me a lot about vintage dressing, and I have bought a number of pieces from her in the past.” Balch is a vintage expert to the stars and has dressed the likes of Rhianna and Adut Akech in yesteryear’s Moschino and Christian Lacroix. “I think everything in fashion is cyclical, it could never be old if it was never new. Nothing really new is being created, everyone is looking back to create their designs. Women’s current fashion climate is setting the trends on the market for fast fashion to emulate and it is costing our environment. In the Middle East, women feel they are less-than if they wear vintage; you are seen as someone who can’t afford what is new and considered ‘in.’ Through the red carpet, a shift in this opinion is starting to be seen.” Al Khalifa confirms that heritage accessories, however, are much loved. “Vintage jewelry is a big deal in the Middle East. When anyone asks me what I am wearing, I always reply that it’s my mother’s from the Eighties. I love the fact that these pieces have a story.”
Audrey Hepburn wears the Tiffany Diamond in 1961, which Lady Gaga, in Alexander McQueen, wore to collect her 2019 Oscar for Best Original Song
Looking back on the trade of garments, during the Renaissance, it was common for servants to sell their masters’ old clothing to peasants in nearby villages. Fast forward to today, when did vintage fashion become trendworthy? In an article written for Smithsonian Magazine by Professor Jennifer Le Zotte, and in her book Goodwill to Grunge, the author marks the moment second-hand buying went from “suspicious to significant.” In the Fifties, when freethinkers took to the trend of wearing thrifted garments, it became desirable. An affront to capitalism, these groups were opting out of the bourgeoisie fashion scene, with the view that if you adopted the trend, you were special, unique, and different. The style adage goes that fashion recycles every 20 years, and stars are looking back, to appear forward-thinking. A lot like the grass roots of vintage, one can see a relation to how celebrities categorize themselves today when wearing exclusive, one-of-a-kind pieces. It is something of a rebellion against commercialized fashion and acts as a further differentiator for women seeking to separate themselves from the crowded huddle of designer trends.
Originally published in the July/August 2022 issue of Vogue Arabia
Read Next: How To Shop for Vintage Fashion in Dubai Like a Pro: 5 Tips From a Connoisseur

Bella Hadid Arrives in the Metaverse With a New Line of NFTs

Bella Hadid Arrives in the Metaverse With a New Line of NFTs

reBASE
Everyone wants a piece of Bella Hadid. Now, thanks to a new NFT (non-fungible token) platform called CY-B3LLA, they’ll be able to grab one, albeit in a modern, somewhat strange way. In collaboration with reBASE, a social metaverse site, Hadid is releasing a massive range—11,111 unique works, to be exact—of shoppable online art pieces based on her own image. These NFTs are digital assets, essentially cybernetic souvenirs or collectibles. It’s also more than just having the JPEG saved on your desktop: You receive a digital record (essentially a serial number or certificate of authenticity) that proves that you and only you purchased this specific asset. Hadid asked 10 different creatives to make art out of 3D scans of her own body, including portraits where she’s done up like an animated cyborg queen. She’s had a waiting list open for weeks, with over half a million people signing up online, and finally, now that CY-B3LLA is dropping, they’ll be able to get their own slice of supermodel right in their own inbox.
Hadid first had a kernel of the idea thanks to a lifelong interest in gaming. Growing up, her younger brother Anwar loved World of Warcraft, but Hadid herself was always attracted to the poppy universe of Mario. “My alias when I was 18, when I started traveling for work, was Princess Peach,” she says with glee over Zoom. When the world locked down due to COVID, her fascination with online life went into overdrive. “Over quarantine, my dream was to be a full gamer girl and play other people,” she says. “When the NFT craze came, I was genuinely curious about what that community looked like. It went from gaming—me wanting to create this cool avatar and be in that universe and connect with people—to this.”
reBASE
Naturally, Hadid was excited by the aesthetic possibilities of creating art out of her own image. She submitted to a 3D scan that the artists would then be able to use to create the NFTs. “There were probably 200 cameras surrounding me and I stood in the middle and changed my shape so it got all these different parts of my body, different versions of my facial expressions, fingers, toes. We wanted it to be very realistic,” she says. But beyond the look and feel of the NFTs, she built this new platform to have a community aspect. Though some of the details still sound hazy, purchasing one of Hadid’s NFTs will eventually grant you access to online and real life meet-and-greets with the model. “We’re gonna set up different events. Tokyo—I hope that’s one of our first launch spaces. It’d be an airdrop essentially: If you’re in Tokyo having coffee and all of a sudden I’m right next door to you, you’d get a ping,” she says. “Just going to different places I love and seeing the people who support me and giving them a real hug.”
Hadid certainly knows a thing or two about capturing audience attention online. She has already proven herself as World Wide Web gold. For a recent run of red carpet looks at Cannes Film Festival, for instance, she caused a small internet fashion brushfire by teaming up with stylist Law Roach for an incredible string of archival dresses, including pieces from Chanel, Tom Ford’s Gucci era, and a vintage black Versace dress from 1987 with an epic voluminous bow around the waist. “Who is the one person who could make me feel confident enough to go for my dream of doing all these archival moments? That for me is Law [Roach]. Him and I have very similar minds when it comes to fashion. I told him I wanted it to be classic old festival looks,” she says. “Donatella was nice enough to open up Gianni’s whole archive for us, which is unheard of, and I was so honored. She really had in mind exactly what she wanted for me.”
Regarding CY-B3LLA, Hadid understands that there’s some well-deserved mistrust out there about the celebrity-NFT-industrial complex. “Where that skepticism comes from is the people who just want to have a money grab,” she says. “To me, it’s so much bigger than that. I want it to be a collective. It’s not a one-stop shop—this is a real passion. I want to be used as a vessel for communication and respect and love. ”
Hadid, who has discussed her struggles with anxiety in the past, feels like these yet-uncharted metaverse spaces have potential to be healthier and happier than the online world we are all currently living in. “The whole Instagram and Twitter world, it’s out for me—I just can’t look at notifications anymore,” she says. “Once we start to be so aware of what every single person thinks of us, you start to lose track of what you need and what you want. These horrible anxieties we all have—I feel like that’s what’s circulating on the internet.” There will be a dedicated group for CY-B3LLA-ites on the Discord chat app, and she imagines popping in a couple times a week just to chat with her friends and fans in a low-impact environment made up of like minded people. Eventually, as the metaverse develops into a more fully-realized space, she hopes to find even more ways for her people to inhabit, congregate, exchange ideas, and feel at home. “There’s a scary part of the internet but there’s a really beautiful part of the internet,” she says, “and that’s people being able to find a space where they can belong.”
All in all, she’s aware of how weird this NFT and metaverse talk can sound to people not yet on board with the burgeoning movement, but she’s ready to give herself over to it all the same, one token at a time. “It’s just a beautiful way that we can have a community. I don’t know if I feel like a community leader—it’s not just about connecting me to people, but about connecting people to other people,” she says. “I just want to be an instrument.”
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk
Read next: Gigi Hadid Brings Back Everyone’s Favorite Pink + Red Color Palette With a Couture Gown by Rising Designer Sohee Park

Bella Hadid Just Wore That Mythical Tom Ford-era Gucci Dress at Cannes Film Festival 2022

Bella Hadid Just Wore That Mythical Tom Ford-era Gucci Dress at Cannes Film Festival 2022

Photo: Getty
Some Tom Ford-era Gucci clothes are harder than others to find, but Bella Hadid has shown up on the Cannes red carpet in one of the rarest pieces. At the premiere of Les Bonnes Étoiles, the model opted for a curve-skimming white dress from the Fall 1996 collection complete with a hip cut-out that revealed a metal buckle from the archive of Lab2022. Originally, the garment made its debut on none other than a smoldering Carolyn Murphy. It’s not surprising that Hadid would wear archival Gucci—this is the latest in a long line of vintage that she’s been donning for Cannes—but it is notable that she’s in a dress so covetable and rare.
This specific dress has lived on as the stuff of legend within vintage communities. I myself have searched and searched to no avail. The iterations I have found are priced at $15,000 and upwards. Vintage dealer Olivia Haroutounian once told me she had found it but alas the piece was too damaged to purchase.
Photo: Getty
Now, expect the remaining dresses to sell out–and for the prices on pieces from Ford’s collections to increase after yet another celebrity endorsement. Kim Kardashian and Kylie Jenner both had a streak wearing the designer back in 2018, which created a mad dash for the product. The industry seems to follow, too: A few months later, after the Kardashian-Jenner moment, vintage store James Veloria held a Tom Ford-era Gucci curated sale, further increasing the fervor around the pieces.
As for this time around? Better put alerts on for Tom Ford-era Gucci.
Originally published in Vogue.com

Met Gala 2022: See Every Outfit Your Favorite Celebrities Wore on the Red Carpet

Met Gala 2022: See Every Outfit Your Favorite Celebrities Wore on the Red Carpet

Photo: Getty
The 2022 Met Gala, otherwise known as the First Monday in May, is back once again! After being canceled in 2020 and held in September last year, the glitzy event returned to its usual time slot this year. Held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the event saw A-list celebrities descend upon the red carpet in celebration of the museum’s new exhibition, “In America: An Anthology of Fashion,” which will serve as an exploration of American fashion. The display was presented across 13 of the American period rooms in the museum, and featured design works from Bill Blass, Brooks Brothers, Lloyd Kiva New, and more.
On the red carpet, meanwhile, well-clad stars did their best to take on the Gilded Glamour, White Tie dress code, where they were encouraged to approach late 19th-century clothing through a modern lens. Given the step and repeat is one of the most-photographed in the world, one could expect the many actors, models, singers, and designers in attendance to bring their fashion A-game to the Met Gala. After all, it has a long history of creating memorable outfits that are seen around the globe—and this year was certainly no different.
As for who was on the guest list this times? The official co-chairs this year included Blake Lively, Ryan Reynolds, Regina King, and Lin-Manuel Miranda, and attendees included Kim Kardashian, Katy Perry, Kate Moss, and many more.
Below, scroll through some of the best 2022 Met Gala red carpet looks.
Bella Hadid in Burberry. Photo: Getty
Pete Davidson in Dior Men and Kim Kardashian. Photo: Getty
Photo: Getty
Nicki Minaj in Burberry. Photo: Getty
Lily James. Photo: Getty
Gabrielle Union in Versace. Photo: Getty
Erykah Badu and Francesco Risso. Photo: Getty
Katy Perry in Oscar de la Renta. Photo: Getty
Karlie Kloss in Givenchy. Photo: Getty
Lizzo in Thom Browne. Photo: Getty
Sara Sampaio in Michael Kors. Photo: Getty
Kendall Jenner in Prada. Photo: Getty
Cardi B in Versace. Photo: Getty
Kylie Jenner in Off-White. Photo: Getty
Molly Sims. Photo: Getty
Kourtney Kardashian and Travis Barker in Thom Browne. Photo: Getty
Kerry Washington in Tory Burch. Photo: Getty
Nicola Peltz-Beckham in Valentino. Photo: Getty
Cara Delevingne in Dior Haute Couture. Photo: Getty
Kiki Layne in Atelier Prabal Gurung. Photo: Getty
Khloé Kardashian in Moschino. Photo: Getty
Gwen Stefani in Vera Wang. Photo: Getty
Addison Rae. Photo: Getty
Taylor Hill. Photo: Getty
Emily Ratajkowski in Altelier Versace. Photo: Getty
Lily Aldridge in Khaite. Photo: Getty
Simone Ashley in Moschino. Photo: Getty
Chloe Bailey. Photo: Getty
Naomi Campbell in Burberry. Photo: Getty
Kate Moss. Photo: Getty
Christine Baranski. Photo: Getty
Eva Chen in Peter Do. Photo: Getty
Gigi Hadid in Versace. Photo: Getty
Hailey Bieber in Saint Laurent. Photo: Getty
Irina Shayk in Burberry. Photo: Getty
Miranda Kerr in Oscar de la Renta. Photo: Getty
Dakota Johnson in Gucci. Photo: Getty
Jessica Chastain in Gucci. Photo: Getty
Jacob Elordi. Photo: Getty
Anitta in Moschino. Photo: Getty
Denée Benton. Photo: Getty
Madelaine Petsch in Moschino. Photo: Getty
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Sabrina Carpenter in Paco Rabanne. Photo: Getty
Megan Thee Stallion in Moschino. Photo: Getty
Regé-Jean Page. Photo: Getty
Winnie Harlow in Iris van Herpen. Photo: Getty
Nicola Coughlan in Richard Quinn. Photo: Getty
Billie Eilish in Gucci. Photo: Getty
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Teyana Taylor in Iris van Herpen. Photo: Getty
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Amber Valetta. Photo: Getty
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Kaia Gerber. Photo: Getty
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Tom Ford. Photo: Getty
Vlake Lively. Photo: Getty
Anna Wintour. Photo: Getty
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Vanessa Hudgens. Photo: Getty
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Mindy Kaling. Photo: Getty
Precious Lee. Photo: Getty
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Kris Jenner in Oscar de la Renta. Photo: Getty
Daisy Edgar-Jones in Oscar de la Renta. Photo: Getty
Carey Mulligan in Schiaparelli Haute Couture. Photo: Getty
Alexa Chung. Photo: Getty
Bradley Cooper. Photo: Getty
Hoyeon Jung in Louis Vuitton. Photo: Getty
Chloe Fineman. Photo: Getty
 Hillary Clinton in Altuzarra. Photo: Getty
Hugh Jackman and Deborra-Lee Furness in Tom Ford. Photo: Getty
Alicia Keys. Photo: Getty
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Joe Jonas and Sophie Turner. Photo: Getty
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Riz Ahmed. Photo: Getty
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Camila Cabello. Photo: Getty
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Originally published in Vogue.com

10 Times Arab Stars Lit Up the Met Gala Red Carpet in Standout Looks

10 Times Arab Stars Lit Up the Met Gala Red Carpet in Standout Looks

Iman
Arab representation at the Met Gala has only gotten bigger and better over the years, with many regional names making Best Dressed lists. Embracing the theme each year with their own unique takes, the Middle East’s much-loved have left a mark on “fashion’s biggest night out”, which makes their appearances that much more anticipated.
In 1997, part-Lebanese actor Salma Hayek attended her first Met Gala which paid tribute to the late Gianni Versace. For the occasion, she dressed in a custom black Atelier Versace dress which featured a mix of fabrics and a daring thigh-high slit. Many more red carpets later, Hayek served up another noteworthy look in 2019, dressed in a black and gold Gucci gown and a star crown for the theme ‘Camp: Notes on Fashion’. The same year saw a number of standout moments from Arabs, such as Gigi Hadid‘s dramatic all-white outfit by Michael Kors (worn with a makeup look to match), and Imaan Hammam‘s bright pink number by Peter Dundas, complemented with two-tone frosted eyeshadow.
Among the most memorable and rare appearances made at the Met Gala were ones by HM Queen Rania of Jordan, and Amal Clooney. In 2016, Queen Rania was the only royal at the event, and chose to eschew the theme ‘Manus X Machina: Fashion in the Age of Technology’ to go for a graceful Valentino gown. Later in 2018, Clooney walked the carpet for the second and last time, making a statement in navy trousers attached to a sweeping train and a floral corset by Richard Quinn.

Below, take a look at the best Met Gala looks of all time, courtesy of Arab stars
Salma Hayek in Atelier Versace in 1997. Photo: Instagram.com
Queen Rania in Valentino in 2016. Photo: Instagram.com
Amal Clooney in Richard Quinn in 2018. Photo: Instagram.com
Bella Hadid in Chrome Hearts in 2018. Photo: Instagram.com
Imaan Hammam in Zac Posen in 2018. Photo: Instagram.com
Gigi Hadid in Versace in 2108. Photo: Instagram.com
Imaan Hammam in Peter Dundas in 2019. Photo: Instagram.com
Salma Hayek in Gucci in 2019. Photo: Instagram.com
Gigi Hadid in Michael Kors in 2019. Photo: Instagram.com
Iman in Harris Reed in 2021. Photo: Instagram.com
Read Next: Pictures: 23 of the Best Dressed Celebrity Couples Seen on the Met Gala Red Carpet

Gigi Hadid is Launching Her Very Own Clothing Line

Gigi Hadid is Launching Her Very Own Clothing Line

Photo: Instagram.com/gigihadid
Gigi Hadid is putting her time and experience in the fashion industry to use in a new clothing line of her own.
In an interview with Vogue, the part-Palestinian model shared her excitement and offered insight into how the brand is coming along. “Working on my clothing line has been incredible because it’s a different setting, where I get to be involved in team-building and design,” said the 26-year-old. “I’m just trying to be creative all the time, and keep coming up with ways that I can put that into the world in a way that touches people.”
While this would mark Hadid’s first solo clothing brand, it is not the first time the mother-of-one has ventured into designing, having collaborated with Tommy Hilfiger for four seasons. The duo made their debut collaboration in September 2016 with the Tommy Pier collection. “Collaborating with Tommy has been a great introduction to the world of design, and has also taught me about expressing my individuality and finding inspiration in everything around me,” the model previously shared with Vogue Arabia.

Also off the runway, another one of Hadid’s upcoming projects making use of her industry experience is Next in Fashion. The design competition set to stream on Netflix will see Hadid co-host the show alongside designer Tan France. “I’m so excited about both,” Hadid said about her brand and working on Next in Fashion. “We’re working with the production team right now, finalizing guest judges and episodes with the hope that the audience feels how much fun and love we’re putting into everything.”
Read Next: The Key to Bella Hadid’s Runway-Ready Skin? This Easy (and Effective) Beauty Ritual

5 Things To Know About Ralph Lauren’s Black And White AW 2022 Show

5 Things To Know About Ralph Lauren’s Black And White AW 2022 Show

Fashion critic Anders Christian Madsen shares five key takeaways from Ralph Lauren’s autumn/winter 2022 presentation, which took place off-schedule in New York at the Museum of Modern Art.
The show was set in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City

As fashion made its definitive return to the runways this season after the pandemic, Ralph Lauren chose to wait just a few weeks more before staging his own homecoming in New York City. His show took place in the sleek surroundings of the The Museum of Modern Art, with the city’s skyline as its backdrop. And it wasn’t without hesitation. When he planned it, he said, “There was no war in Ukraine. The tragedy and devastation we are witnessing now was unthinkable. Back then all I could think about was coming back together with my teams and all of you to share the hopefulness that collaboration and creativity can inspire. In the midst of this sadness, we go forward united in our hope for peace, and our hope for the end of this pandemic and a return to being together.”
Joe Biden’s family was in attendance

Models including Shalom Harlow and Gigi and Bella Hadid glided down a staircase onto a mirrored floor and meandered their way through Lauren’s modernist American lounge, where guests kicked back in leather seats around coffee tables. Reflecting this designer’s universal appeal, show-goers represented every genre of show business and beyond: Jessica Chastain, Lily Collins, Janelle Monáe, Angus Cloud, Henry Golding, and – on an invitation symbolic of Lauren’s convictions – President Biden’s granddaughters Naomi Biden and Finnegan Biden. “I am so proud to be with you again sharing not only a collection, but an optimism for living that respects the dignity of all,” the designer said.
The collection was largely monochrome

Lauren showed a collection to match his modernist setting: predominantly black and white, it made a case for the classic and timeless allure of monochrome dressing, occasionally interrupted by punches of red. For the bold impact of his handsome women’s suits styled chicly over white shirts and black polo necks, his slinky black jumpsuits cut into graphic lines, hand-spun sweaters in pared-back Nordic patterns, and long, languid women’s coats in the fabrics of the heritage men’s wardrobe, the muted color palette and ageless spirit of the collection had a familiar and almost soothing effect in a time when that is much-needed. Lauren echoed that impression: “It’s a celebration of the timeless style of black and white emboldened in the sleek lines of tailored silhouettes,” he said.
Lauren added hints of sportswear to his formal lines

While Lauren kept things on the formal side, drawing on the reassuring language of a classic wardrobe, he couldn’t resist a few moments of sporty indulgence. Over her tuxedo, Vittoria Ceretti wore a hyper-elevated black wool varsity jacket with leather sleeves and the New York Yankees logo embroidered across the back. Gigi Hadid tucked a sporty black sweater with a graphic RL logo into a neat black trouser, and Lauren himself took his bow in a similarly styled look worn with black and white trainers. The collection often felt like a statement about the order and solace the traditional formal wardrobe can contribute within times of turbulence, but this is, after all, the designer who normalized the infiltration of sportswear into our everyday wardrobes.
He introduced new accessories and jazzed up his classics

Embellishing his black and white proposals, Lauren debuted a string of new accessories that walked the tightrope between daytime glamour and evening pizzazz. A new Doctor bag in alligator with gold hardware easily nailed the former category, backed up by Deco Frame bags in velvet or calfskin with delicate embroideries. The classic Ricky – named after the designer’s wife – was reinterpreted as a clutch and adorned with gold monogram stitching. Lauren complemented his monochrome palette with two-tone spectator shoes harking back to the golden age of New York, finished off his evening silhouettes with velvet pumps and sandals, and shook up his black and white ball with the occasional glossy riding boot trimmed with scarlet leather.
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk

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