Barbie

1992 to Now: What Barbiecore Looked Like Before Barbiecore

1992 to Now: What Barbiecore Looked Like Before Barbiecore

Brigitte Bardot in a promotion for Naughty Girl, 1956. Photo: Getty
God might have created woman—if the title of Roger Vadim’s 1956 film is to be believed—but Mattel created Barbie. Would the fantastical plastic doll have been possible without the popularity of real-life sex kitten Brigitte Bardot? There might not be a definitive answer to that question, but it’s certain that both the woman and the plaything represented unattainable beauty ideals.
An original Barbie launched in March 1959. Photo: Getty
Over the years Barbie has expanded her repertoire and her wardrobe. The filming of Greta Gerwig’s forthcoming movie has made Barbiecore—which mostly translates into skimpy looks in bright pink—the trend of this summer. It’s not the first time, and won’t be the last, that this überfeminine aesthetic has peaked.

Below, take a look at some throwback Barbie moments.
Karen Mulder in Valentino Couture, fall 1992. Photo: Getty
Chanel, spring 1994 ready-to-wear. Photo: Condé Nast Archive
Brandy Quinones in Thierry Mugler, spring 1994 ready-to-wear. Photo: Getty
Claudia Schiffer in Chanel, spring 1995 ready-to-wear. Photo: Getty
Claudia Schiffer in Atelier Versace, fall 1996 couture. Photo: Getty
Carla Bruni in Balmain, spring 1996 couture. Photo: Getty
Karen Mulder, Cindy Crawford, and Eva Herzigova in Hervé Léger, spring 1996. Photo: Getty
Paris Hilton, 2001 Photo: Instagram.com
Miley Cyrus in Moschino, 2014. Photo: Instagram.com
Moschino, spring 2015 ready-to-wear
Moschino, spring 2015 ready-to-wear
Moschino, spring 2015 ready-to-wear
Rihanna in Giambattista Valli, 2015. Photo: Instagram.com
Moschino, fall 2019 ready-to-wear. Photo: GoRunway
Kacey Musgraves as Barbie in Moschino at the 2019 Met gala. Photo: Getty
Originally published in Vogue.com
Read next: Hailey Bieber Is the Latest Star To Jump on Board the Real-Life Barbie Trend With a Bright Pink Dress

Hailey Bieber Is the Latest Star To Jump on Board the Real-Life Barbie Trend With a Bright Pink Dress

Hailey Bieber Is the Latest Star To Jump on Board the Real-Life Barbie Trend With a Bright Pink Dress

Photo: Instagram.com/haileybieber
Corsetry is a Versace signature, and for autumn/winter 2022, Donatella Versace made it central to the collection. Now, muse Hailey Bieber has become one of the first to road-test Donatella’s new-season corsetry, fresh from the catwalk.
The model and mogul orchestrated an Instagram photoshoot wearing Look 12 from the collection: a satin corset mini dress with intricate boning skimming the chest, torso and side seams, embellished with bejeweled Medusa motifs on the straps.
Hailey accessorized her look with layered Tiffany & Co. jewelry. Photo: Instagram.com/haileybieber
Hailey’s chosen shade? Pink, of course, perfectly in line with the rise of Barbiecore. Stylist Karla Welch posted a picture of the model in her bubblegum look with the caption: “Paging the Barbie movie.”
Nicola Peltz Beckham is another famous fan of Versace corsets. The actor, who incorporated a number of Versace looks into her wardrobe for her wedding celebrations, told Vogue at the time: “There’s just nothing that feels better than a Versace corset… The fit is impeccable. It makes you feel sexy, but classy at the same time. Versace is just the perfect thing to put on after a big bridal gown.”
Versace autumn/winter 2022. Photo: Instagram.com/haileybieber
While Nicola kept her bridal accessories to a minimum, Hailey dialed up the glamour in layered Tiffany & Co. diamond and chain necklaces, and a pair retro white boots from Naked Wolfe. Extra? That’s exactly what she was going for. As she put it on Instagram: “Having a little extra fun today.”
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk
Read next: Hailey Bieber Wore Three Powerful Minidresses in 24 Hours

Now You Can Dress Like a Barbie in Balmain

Now You Can Dress Like a Barbie in Balmain

Ken avatar wears dungarees and jumper by Balmain x Barbie®. Trainers by Balmain. Barbie avatar wears blazer and shorts by Balmain x Barbie®. Shoes by Manolo Blahnik Barbie®Avatars created by Forget Me Not for the Balmain x Barbie® collaboration. Sculpts provided by Barbie®
It makes sense that Barbie would wear Balmain. A style icon since the Eisenhower administration, she’s known to take some fashion risks befitting the French house. But the two are now betting that humans will want to dress in Barbie-inspired Balmain dresses, sweats, and bags. Creative Director Olivier Rousteing has created a genderless collection for adults, inspired by Barbie and Ken, that speaks not only to their tastes, but also to Rousteing’s childhood memories and hopes for the futures. “It’s not only the dream of a designer, it’s a dream of a kid, you know?” he says, adding that as a kid he was told not to play with the dolls. “That I can create a collection with Barbie today shows how the world has changed, and how good it feels to be free with yourself without being judged.”
Barbie x Balmain. Photo: Rob Rusling
Rousteing says he approached this project with two minds: one of a “kid dreaming of Barbie,” and one of a top designer. He took Balmain’s house codes—the Labyrinth monogram designed by Pierre Balmain in the ’70s, the shoulder pads, the oversized gold buttons, even some couture pieces—and incorporated them with Barbie’s visual world to create 50 items of clothing and accessories. In addition to the clothes, the collection is modeled by CGI dolls and three NFTs depicting Barbie and friends in Balmain will be auctioned.
Barbie avatars both wear Balmain x Barbie® collection and accessories. Avatars created by Forget Me Not for the Balmain x Barbie® collaboration. Sculpts provided by Barbie®
As for the pink, of which there is plenty, he created several shades and melded the more dusty pink he’s known for with Barbie’s signature bubblegum shade. One of his prized pieces is a replica of a dress he made for his Fabergé-inspired collection in fall 2012. “I reproduced it exactly in pink, with all the straps and padding and Swarovskis,” he says. On the opposite end of the spectrum of formality is his other favorite item: a sweatshirt with the Balmain logo in Barbie font. These pieces and the rest of the limited edition capsule collection will be available on January 13 worldwide. The collection itself ranges from US $295 to $42,494, prices that speak to the Balmain side of the collaboration.
Photo: Marie Rouge/ Courtesy of Balmain
This isn’t Rousteing’s first time working with Mattel, either. Barbie and Ken sat in the front row of a digital 2021 runway show, and the designer has made doll-sized clothes for her and the Claudia Schiffer Barbie before. Still, Rousteing calls this “a fun collection with a deep, deep message.” The main reason is that the collection is mostly genderless. After all, in a Barbie world, you can create your own rules. “You can be Ken and borrow the clothes of Barbie and Barbie can borrow the clothes of Ken,” Rousteing says, adding, “At the end of the day, you can create a society that is about freedom and not about stereotypes.”
Photo: Marie Rouge/Courtesy of Balmain
Read Next: Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing, Chloé’s Natacha Ramsay-Levi, and Cedric Charbit of Balenciaga Discuss the Future of the Fashion Show
Originally published on Vogue.com

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