aw22

5 Things To Know About Tommy Hilfiger’s Factory-Inspired AW 2022 Show And Richard Quinn Collaboration

5 Things To Know About Tommy Hilfiger’s Factory-Inspired AW 2022 Show And Richard Quinn Collaboration

Photo: Instagram.com/hunterabrams
Tommy Hilfiger first knew of Richard Quinn when Her late Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, presented the designer with the inaugural Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design in February 2018. Four years on, Hilfiger called upon Quinn to collaborate on his autumn/winter 2022 showcase, which was held at New York Fashion Week just days after the Queen’s death.
From the conversations that the pair had on the morning of the event to the illustrious cast that walked, here are the key takeaways from the show.

Tommy Hilfiger first heard of Richard Quinn because of Queen Elizabeth II
Photo: Vogue.co.uk

Like the rest of the world, it was thanks to Her late Majesty that Tommy Hilfiger first heard of Richard Quinn. “I knew him from the pictures of the Queen – God bless her – sitting in the front row with Anna [Wintour] at his show,” Hilfiger said during a preview for his see-now-buy-now autumn/winter 2022 show in New York four days after the monarch’s death. It included a collaboration with Quinn, whose February 2018 show went down in history as pictures of the Queen and Wintour taking in his gimp masks and foil gowns runway-side went around the world. “I think she probably thought she had seen it all… until that point,” Hilfiger smiled. “It’s an iconic moment that will never be again.” Quinn, who joined him in the preview, said it had been a defining moment in his career. “She definitely had an impact in my trajectory for sure. Overnight, people knew she been at someone’s fashion show.”
The show subverted Hilfiger’s preppy signatures
Photo: Vogue.co.uk

If it were those kind of contrasts – royalty and gimp masks, florals and fetish – that made Quinn famous in the first place, his collaboration with Hilfiger only cemented the subversion. Presented in the final looks of Hilfiger’s show, the capsule collection merged Quinn’s trademarks with the American designer’s preppy disposition, in varsity jackets, oversized puffer coats in floral prints, polo shirts, and spiky leather jackets. “It’s nice to take these garments and completely twist them, and see them come out on the other side. I’ve added more volume to American chinos and made the traditional masculine pieces a little more intricate with florals; a little more daring,” Quinn said. “I always thought florals were mumsy so I limited the number of florals in my collections. But done this way, it makes florals look modern and relevant and cool,” Hilfiger said.
Attitudes were fierce despite the rain
Photo: Vogue.co.uk

Even the biblical rain pouring down on Hilfiger’s models in his outdoor venue in Brooklyn couldn’t take the attitude away from a show that borrowed from the sexy ferociousness of Quinn’s often S&M-informed genetics. With The Queens’s remix of Madonna and Beyoncé’s “Break My Soul” blasting through the rain – and a live drum solo from Travis Barker for the finale, who had graced a front row that also counted his wife Kourtney Kardashian, Kris Jenner, Lisa Rinna and Harry Hamlin – it showed a naughtier side of the Tommy girl and boy. I like the fact that we’ve never done anything of that sort,” Hilfiger said. “I adore punk. I’m obsessed with it. I was there in the day, with The Sex Pistols and The Clash and CBGB and Malcolm McLaren. I was there. It was a time when fashion was turned on its head. I’ve always loved tartan, cowboys, cheerleader, the jock. I think the different categories within the collaboration are very cool and sort of timely.”
The show featured an illustrious cast
Photo: Vogue.co.uk

In line with the Quinn collaboration, the show – which marked Hilfiger’s return to New York Fashion Week – was titled Tommy Factory as a reference to Andy Warhol’s fabled Factory where artists came together. The see-now-buy-now collection was an urban exercise in the American iconography and prep that defines Hilfiger’s creative grammar, emblazoned with a new college-like monogram created in partnership with the graphic designer Fergus Purcell. Guests arrived through the backstage entrance of the venue and effectively walked through the behind-the-scenes action as if it were an art studio. On the runway, Hilfiger put together an illustrious cast including Lila Moss, Winnie Harlow, Alton Mason, Hari Nef, Julia Fox, Paloma Elsesser and Precious Lee, and Warhol’s right-hand-man Bob Colacello and “Warhol superstar’ and actress Donna Jordan.
Hilfiger and Quinn reflected on the Queen
Photo: Vogue.co.uk

On the morning of the show, the conversation naturally kept leading back to the death of Queen Elizabeth II. “I’ve met the King,” Hilfiger said, referring to the new King Charles III, “and his siblings and his ex-wife Diana, [Princess of Wales] but never the Queen.” Quinn described the Queen’s appearance at his show in 2018 as a somewhat fantastical experience. “It was one of the first shows I did, and I was kind being drip-fed that something was going to happen. It wasn’t until the very last few days that I was actually told what was going to happen,” he paused. “Suddenly she’s in front of you and… it’s a very surreal moment.”
Originally published in Vogue.co.uk
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5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Fresh Take On Haute Couture For AW 2022

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Fresh Take On Haute Couture For AW 2022

“I wanted lightness in the clothes this season,” Fendi’s artistic director Kim Jones says of his fresh approach to the brand’s autumn/winter 2022 haute couture collection. Below, Anders Christian Madsen shares his key takeaways from the show.

Kim Jones debuted a lighter take on haute couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

There was a lightness to the savoir-faire Kim Jones presented for Fendi on Thursday afternoon in Palais Brongniart, which uplifted his take on haute couture with a new freshness. As the show progressed, he quite literally peeled off the layers until the lightness reached a point of near-nudity, with buoyant embroidered overlays floating ethereally over the models’ skin. “It’s pretty light,” he concurred during a preview. “I wanted lightness in the clothes this season, also in terms of how the embroideries were done.” If Jones’s first forays into couture at Fendi were about showcasing his discoveries of the magic made possible by the artisans of this haute institution through multi-layered craftsmanship, this season represented a clean slate, and one that felt like a way of using haute couture as a proposal for ideas that could trickle into real life.

It featured Kata Yuzen motifs from Japan
Photo: Gorunway.com

It all began with a trip to Japan in March, before the borders opened. “I managed to get in. I was so determined,” Jones said, hinting at some next-level string-pulling. “I used to go six times a year. I love it so much. We went to see a number of the suppliers we’ve always worked with on special projects, and I bought all these fragments of 17th-century kimonos. Just pieces of hand-painted silk fabric.” His finds prompted him to contact a family of traditional Kata Yuzen fabric-makers in Kyoto, whom he knew from previous collaborations. “They hadn’t really been working very much because there were no ceremonies in two years. I asked if they would like to do something with us.” The results were a series of beautiful fragment patterns in pastel colors, which Jones worked into column dresses that cut a monastic silhouette for the collection that felt decidedly Fendi.
It was a real-life approach to couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

“With me, when I’m looking at stuff, I’m always thinking past, present, future. The past is the research, the present is now, and the future is the idea of where it’s going to go,” Jones said, referring to the optical white box that framed the show and added the sense of futurism to proceedings, which was also present in his previous haute couture show. It had a simplifying effect on a collection that felt like a real consideration for how haute couture might be used in everyday life – by the lucky few – and, more importantly, how it might serve to push and inspire ideas for ready-to-wear. Take for instance the scalloped embroideries that adorned a two-piece set, which was, essentially, a T-shirt and a slouchy trouser. Along with the Kata Yuzen, these motifs and techniques felt ripe for ready-to-wear adaptation.
Jones gave us daywear couture
Photo: Gorunway.com

Jones also made pragmatic proposals for daywear couture. The two exquisitely-cut tailored looks that opened the show were created from the finest vicuna, a tactility Jones went on to interpret in the knitted dresses that followed. “Loro Piana always send me a piece of vicuna for Christmas. I always make myself a nice tailored coat out of it,” he quipped, but those desires are entirely universal. Of the knitwear, Jones said it was all about creating a super-luxe lightness for real-life (the extravagant kind, in any case). “I wanted to have some light knitwear pieces for, you know, that jet-set lifestyle of the client. They can wear that on the plane and get off and still [feel] fabulous.” Seeing Jones tackle the idea of real-life daywear in his haute couture was great and created a real affinity with his ready-to-wear collections.
Jones has the same birth chart as Karl Lagerfeld
Photo: Gorunway.com

Asked by Suzy Menkes if he’s the new Karl Lagerfeld – what with his multi-faceted work schedule and all – Jones laughed. “I don’t think I’m the new Karl, but I have exactly the same birth chart. I like to work hard.” In the case of this collection, his hard work was in the detail: a subtle, muted and pared-back illustration of the painstaking art form that is haute couture. “Fendi is about a working woman. A woman that’s powerful,” he said, reflecting on the role of the collection in the real world. “I love the colors. I’m really happy with it.”

Originally published in Vogue.co.uk 
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5 Things To know About Dolce Gabbana’s Metaversal Milan Fashion Week Fall 2022 Show

5 Things To know About Dolce Gabbana’s Metaversal Milan Fashion Week Fall 2022 Show

Dolce and Gabbana brought sexy back for autumn/winter 2022. Read on for the key takeaways from the show, below.

The show was inspired by all things sensual

The Dolce & Gabbana invitation arrived in a lacquered red box containing a suspender belt and stockings. “A fetish dream inside a box,” was how the designers described it via translators in an Italian conference on the morning of their show. Following last month’s men’s show, which imagined a trip into the metaverse, Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana continued their study of the real and virtual. “We try to make the fantasy real. We do the inverse process. We normally take something that’s real and develop it as unreal, but in this case, we dream up an avatar and try to make it real,” Gabbana explained.

They evoked virtual reality through tailoring

Drawing on the visual language of video games, the designers employed tailoring to cut a graphic silhouette that didn’t just evoke the exaggerated shapes we associate with virtual reality, but exemplified the broadened shoulders and nipped-in waists that are taking this season’s runways by storm. On Dolce & Gabbana’s podium, said shoulder was either sloped or almost inflated-looking. It was the designers’ way of pushing reality to an extreme. “The challenge is to do something with tailoring that’s like a cartoon, challenging proportion and volume,” Dolce explained.

Innerwear was at the forefront

Living up to the promise of their invitation, the designers imbued their magnified silhouettes with memories of lingerie and garments from the boudoir, evoking through contrast fabric inserts the contour of a negligee or the curve of a brassiere. Playing with the filters of the metaverse, they layered outfits with transparent bodies worn either under or over bras, suspender belts and stockings, seductively veiling what they called “the fetish dream”. Towards the end of the collection, the ribbons of corsetry multiplied into tops and dresses cinched and tied from all angles; an unreal effect in itself.

Then, the metaverse really came to life

“Exploring new territories and experimenting always excite us and make us think,” Gabbana said. “The metaverse is something that doesn’t belong to our generation but we were so interested in discovering more about it and being able to speak to this new generation, showing our savoir-faire.” They demonstrated their expert craftsmanship to the max in otherworldly looks: puffer coats that covered the head like a video game character, patent dresses with over-dimensional gigot sleeves, and a curvy padded crop top and matching skirt that resembled balloons tied together.

It’s still all about real-life craftsmanship

With their Machine Gun Kelly soundtrack and articulated desire for exploring this elusive metaverse so specific to the new generations, Dolce and Gabbana are entirely transparent in their mission. This isn’t about assuming the esoteric knowledge of the youth, but about showing new generations of shoppers that what they know – artisanal excellence – can be used to amplify the dress codes of the digital era. At the end of the day, there is no such thing as the metaverse, because you can never touch and feel it. Age-old craftsmanship, on the other hand, is about as real as it gets. And as Dolce reminded us, “Instagram only exists if you have a life outside of it.”
Read Next: 5 Things to Know About Chanel’s Art-Infused Spring/Summer 2022 Couture Show
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

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