arab designers

#BuyArabDesigners: The 10 Best Summer Dresses to Add to Your Wardrobe

#BuyArabDesigners: The 10 Best Summer Dresses to Add to Your Wardrobe

Airy cut-outs, mood-boosting colors, and breezy silhouettes—summer dress season is in full swing. What better way to indulge in it than by supporting Arab designers at the same time?
Go for the fail-safe yet playful tie dye print with SemSem’s pink one-shoulder dress or with the cut-out number by Madiyah Al Sharqi x Karen Wazen. If electric colors are up your alley, you are sure to stand out by embracing a unique take on the summer dress with Lama Jouni’s lime green bodycon, the one-shoulder tropical kaftan by Dima Ayad, or the strappy dress with a daring slit by Mrs Keepa.
For everyday neutrals, the austere pieces by Kage, Noon By Noor, and Noor Al Bahraini have you covered. To take the minimalism up by a notch, look to Sandra Mansour’s edgier creation in black, and Nora Al Shaikh’s sarong-style spin on the kaftan.
If your wardrobe can benefit from a new summer dress or two this season, check out our edit above to ensure it champions regional talent too.
Read Next: The Arab Designers Report: Your Guide to Supporting Local Talent

Meet All the Arab Designers Featured in Our 5th Anniversary Issue

Meet All the Arab Designers Featured in Our 5th Anniversary Issue

Krikor Jabotian. Photo: Francesco Scotti
#BuyArabDesigners: What started off with a star-studded campaign film in 2019 has evolved into an ever-present celebration of regional creatives that now goes beyond our print issues. As Vogue Arabia celebrated its 5th anniversary this month, its biggest edition ever at 500 pages came with a host of Arab designers featured in distinct and spectacular editorials starring both, rising and well-known models, and moving features.
“We are so proud of how far the #BuyArabDesigners campaign has come,” says editor-in-chief Manuel Arnaut. “It’s in Vogue Arabia’s nature to highlight not only the region’s established designers editorially, but to also help elevate the Arab world’s fashion scene by supporting young designers via the Vogue Fashion Prize.” In our March 2022 issue, readers will find a dedicated editorial on the Arab designers who are pushing boundaries in sumptuous colors and designs featuring 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize finalist Yousef Akbar. Another finalist, Emergency Room, forms part of our feature that celebrates the new generation of local brands with sustainability at their core. The prize’s winner, Benchellal, has also lent one of his designs to a showcase of the season’s best artisanal crochet pieces. Among the world’s most well-known Arab couture houses to be spotlighted in our issue are Ashi Studio, Elie Saab, and Alaïa, worn by Algerian-French supermodel Farida Khelfa.
Many of Egypt’s much-loved brands including Azza Fahmy, Okhtein, and Mamzi are also present in the collector’s issue in a special feature starring Elisa Sednaoui, photographed in Ardi Dahshur. In another celebratory story, Lebanese couturier Tony Ward reflects on decades of success of his brand, founded by his father in 1952.

Below, take a closer look at all the Arab designers featured in our March 2022 issue.
Shatha Essa
Photo: Philipp Jelenska
Emergency Room
Photo: Francesco Scotti
Elie Saab couture
Photo: Kiki Xue
Manal Al Hammadi
Photo: Philipp Jelenska
Nafsika Skourti
Photo: Francesco Scotti
Maison Rabih Kayrouz
Photo: Tom Munro
Benchellal
Photo: Domen/Van de Velde
Nour Hammour, and Norma Kamali
Photo: Tom Munro
Autonomie
Photo: Francesco Scotti
Tony Ward
Photo: Courtesy of Tony Ward
Maison Yeya, and Mrs Keepa
Photo: Nima Benati
Mamzi, Rebel Cairo, and Botros Jewelry
Photo: Ämr Ezzeldinn
Mina Tahir
Photo: Francesco Scotti
Mazoura, and Okhtein
Photo: Ämr Ezzeldinn
Ashi Studio
Photo: Kiki Xue
Rami Kadi
Photo: Greg Adamski
Shahad Albandar
Photo: Nima Benati
Sandra Mansour
Photo: Greg Adamski
SemSem
Photo: Mila Namida
Khyeli
Photo: Greg Adamski
Jeux de Mains
Photo: Francesco Scotti
Dima Ayad
Photo: Courtesy of Dima Ayad
Alix
Photo: Ämr Ezzeldinn
Marmar Halim
Photo: Greg Adamski
Alaïa couture
Photo: Kiki Xue
Yousef Akbar
Photo: Greg Adamski
Lama Jouni and Bil Arabi
Photo: Tom Munro
Sara Mrad
Photo: Greg Adamski
Romani
Photo: Francesco Scotti
Zaid Farouki, and Azza Fahmy
Photo: Greg Adamski
Zaid Affas
Photo: Francesco Scotti
Maram, Ramla, and Dima
Photo: Ämr Ezzeldinn
Amina Muaddi
Photo: Tom Munro
Krikor Jabotian
Photo: Francesco Scotti
Read Next: 10 Rising Arab Models From Our Anniversary Issue Who Need to Be on Your Radar

10 Times International Celebrities Walked the Red Carpet in Arab Designers in 2021

10 Times International Celebrities Walked the Red Carpet in Arab Designers in 2021

Jennifer Lopez in Georges Hobeika with Ben Affleck. Photo: Instagram.com
Over the years, we’ve witnessed many Arab designers become the go-to for international celebrities, especially when it comes to red carpet events. Celebrities such as the Queen herself—Beyoncé—has built such a reputation with Arab designers, be it while attending formal ceremonies, or while lounging on vacation with husband Jay-Z. Jennifer Lopez is also among the stars who have shown their appreciation for the artistry of Arab designers time after time, and has been seen dressed in Elie Saab and Zuhair Murad often.

In 2021, we saw even more Arab designers emerging on the global platform, and being spotted on a wide range of  A-List celebrities. Among the many stars who favored talent from the region was American singer Cardi B, who donned a beautiful purple velvet dress with feather detailing and crystal embellishment from Jean- Louis Sabaji Fall 2021 couture for the 2021 American Music Awards.

And that’s not where the list ends. What better way to show up at a friend’s wedding than in a gorgeous neon blue silk chiffon couture number from Rami Kadi? That’s exactly what singer Bebe Rexha did for Paris Hilton’s big day, and in addition to that,  Grammy winner Taylor Swift looked incredible on The Tonight Show in a Zuhair Murad Resort 2022 RTW look: an ivory mod-style dress with gold bead trim. Just like Swift, model Jasmine Tookes was also seen in a Zuhair Murad creation this year. Her pick: a baby blue one-shoulder chiffon gown with floral appliqué.

Christina Aguilera was also seen wearing a look from an Arab designer this year, dazzling in a red couture dress from Yousef al Jasmi, and one of J.Lo’s biggest fashion moments of the year had to be when she stepped out in Los Angeles alongside Ben Affleck, wearing a pastel mousseline draped gown with a matching velvet bow belt from the Elie Saab Haute Couture Fall winter 2021/2022 collection. The 52-year-old icon also took over trending charts when she appeared at the Venice Film Festival in a sculpted ivory dress with cheeky ruffles and a Swarovski-studded neckline from Georges Hobeika. Likewise, Lady Gaga spotlighted her love for Hobeika in custom-made dress at the ‘One Last Time’ concert at Radio City Music Hall.
For a full look at all the international names that gave Arab labels a thumbs up in 2021, start scrolling.

#BuyArabDesigners: Penelopé Cruz Wears Iconic Middle Eastern Labels for Vogue Arabia

#BuyArabDesigners: Penelopé Cruz Wears Iconic Middle Eastern Labels for Vogue Arabia

Dress, Elie Saab; gloves, earrings, Ashi Studio. Photographed by Luigi and Iango for Vogue Arabia November 2021
For Penélope Cruz, Vogue Arabia’s November 2021 issue not only marks her first time fronting the Middle Eastern magazine, but also her debut in creations by iconic Arab designers. Starring on our cover, which celebrates maximalist style and remarkable talents from the region, it was only fitting that Cruz paid homage to the region in her own special way. In the bigger picture, having the Oscar-winner championing local talent also forms part of Vogue Arabia’s long-standing #BuyArabDesigners campaign, which supports emerging and established artists close to home.
For our November 2021 cover spread, Cruz was shot in the far-flung destination of Madrid—which also happens to be her home—by photography duo Luigi and Iango. Tying her shoot to the Arab world sartorially were stunning pieces by couturiers Elie Saab and Ashi Studio. Over the decades, Beirut-based Saab and Saudi-born Ashi have adorned many a star, with Cruz now joining the gilded list.
Dress, gloves, Ashi Studio. Photographed by Luigi and Iango for Vogue Arabia November 2021
Out of the many looks handpicked by stylist Amine Jreissati, the Parallel Mothers actor was featured on our pages wearing two different ensembles by the Middle Eastern designers. The first, a poncho-style dress with party season-appropriate beaded fringes from Elie Saab’s Cruise 2022 collection. This particular look was complemented with elbow-length gloves by Ashi Studio, as well as earrings from the latter’s recently launched jewelry collection. The second—and arguably boldest look from the spread—was also by Beirut-based Ashi Studio: a long ebony dress featuring a fully beaded bustier with silk organza fringes.
Read Next: The Arab World’s Biggest Celebrities All Want to #BuyArabDesigners
Style: Amine JreissatiHair: LuigiMakeup: Pablo IglesiasNails: Lucero HurtadoPhotography assistants: Daniel Gallar Candela, Luca, Jessica Rodriguez LigeroHair assistant: Stephane BeaverStyle assistant: Esther FiolDigital tech: David GarciaCreative production: Laura PriorProduction: Alana Production

Arab Designers are Taking Spring 2022 By Storm with Their Fashion Week Debuts

Arab Designers are Taking Spring 2022 By Storm with Their Fashion Week Debuts

Mrs Keepa SS22. Photographed by Rudolf Azzi
The spring 2022 fashion month is marking a new beginning for many Arab labels. While a number of regional designers were notably absent on last year’s digital and physical runways, this year makes up for it as more take the global spotlight.
Read on to see which Middle Eastern designers have made their fashion week debut this season.
Noon By Noor

After showcasing in New York for 16 consecutive seasons followed by a year-long hiatus, Noon By Noor made its move to the London fashion week calendar. Bahraini cousins Shaikha Noor Al Khalifa and Shaikha Haya Al Khalifa presented their label’s Collection 2 – Light at East London’s Rochelle School, establishing its presence in the European market. For their return, the designers chose to maintain the label’s codes while drawing inspiration from their home country. “A photograph of Bahraini pearl divers in their sarongs gently gathered and tied at the waist, mixed with dreams of summer sunshine, holiday memories and flowers was the start of our spring collection development,” stated Shaikha Noor Al Khalifa. The minimalistic collection features a mix of structured pieces with masculine details alongside feminine dresses and separates with floral embroidery and mirror work.
Reemami

2016 Vogue Fashion Prize winner Reema Al Banna took her Dubai-based brand Reemami to Milan for its fashion week debut this month. For this special collection, the Lebanese designer chose to pay homage to her culture and heritage by incorporating elements from her childhood memories such as horse riding and food. The artistic work of refugees is celebrated too as Palestinian women contribute their patchworks to the collection which is combined with Al Banna’s own designs to interpret them in a modern way. In a fresh color palette of pink, green, white, and beige, the designer offered pieces featuring her signature playful patterns on a mixture of boxy yet feminine silhouettes.
Ramzen

Saudi designer Abdul Al-Romaizan’s label made its fashion week debut with a collection titled Gioia di Vivere (The Joy of Life). At the Palazzo Serbelloni, the new Italy-based brand featured luxury looks for both men and women in bold colors and prints. The collection was inspired by the “shared global experience of stepping out and embracing fashion once more.” Ahead of the show, Al-Romaizan said in a statement, “I am driven by passion and filled with optimism as we prepare to unveil this collection, which honors my heritage as well as the current vision for Saudi Arabia.”
Mrs Keepa

For her first-ever showcase during Paris fashion week, Egyptian-French designer Mariam Yeya dialed up the signature of her brand Mrs Keepa — color, drama, and daring cuts. Aptly named Harmonious Chaos, the 90-piece collection featured a combination of tailoring and sportswear, easy-to-wear basics, and evening-ready pieces. In keeping with the maximalism the Dubai-based label is best known for, highlights of the pieces included voluminous puff sleeves, wide-leg camo pants, and opera gloves.
Read Next: All the Highlights and Trends from Milan Fashion Week SS22

This Virtual Pop-Up for Arab Designers is Returning for a Second Edition

This Virtual Pop-Up for Arab Designers is Returning for a Second Edition

Yassmin Saleh. Photo: Instagram/yassminsaleh
After a successful launch, virtual pop-up store Eastwave Concept is returning for a second edition. The online store supporting emerging and established Arab designers will make its comeback on September 18 with a fresh look and concept.
Titled Hit Refresh, it promises a variety of novel and intriguing pieces. The concept was born from the idea of fresh starts following the hardships brought on by the Covid-19 pandemic. “We, collectively, have been challenged to rise above the turmoil,” a statement from the pop-up reads.

Founded by Judy Daghestani and Dana Mortada, the platform aims to utilize their industrial expertise and knowledge to highlight regional designers, with a focus on marketing their designs to a wider, international audience using e-commerce. Both founders are united by a single mission, “To support MENA designers in sharing their story with international audiences who care about bespoke and artisanal craftsmanship from the East.”
Aliel. Photo: Instagram/@aliel_official
This season, the pop-up will feature the work of 15 regional designers. Lebanese ready-to-wear line Blue For Burgundy, Leila Abo Tira’s Aliel Egypt, and Pearls and Rubies, known for their impeccable tailoring done in bold, jewel tones are just some of the designers part of the lineup. Aliel Egypt is defined by its trademark –  meticulous craft, both in a detailed eye throughout and the final finish. Zaid Farouki and Yassmin Saleh are also set to return for the second season. Saleh is known for each of her collections that are underlined by different socio-psychological phenomena experienced in the present day, while Farouki is known for his intricate, handpainted dresses.
Among the pop-up’s jewelry offerings are Laien, known for their timeless pieces, and Fyne, combining lab-grown diamonds and 18 Karat gold. Laien seeks to focus on combing sustainability with functionality and creating re-wearable pieces that stand the test of time.
Eastwave’s maiden pop-up store was held in August 2020 and featured a group of 16 designers from the region, including Lebanese labels Jessica K, Jeux de Mains, BLSSD, and UAE – based labels Nemozena, Talar Nina, among others.
Read Next: These Regional Designers Have Joined Forces to Dress Women of All Sizes

A Timeline of Beyoncé’s Best Outfits by Arab Designers

A Timeline of Beyoncé’s Best Outfits by Arab Designers

We pay tribute to Queen B by looking back at her most flawless moments wearing Arab designers on the red carpet and beyond. Indeed, some of the superstar singer and mother of three’s most crowning fashion moments have taken place on the red carpets of prestigious award shows and film screenings, where she’s regularly opted for designs by our region’s seasoned couturiers, such as Elie Saab, Reem Acra, and Zuhair Murad. Who can forget the gold, plunging Elie Saab gown she wore to the 64th annual Golden Globe awards? Following that, the singer stunned in a jaw-dropping, floor-length floral and lace Zuhair Murad dress from the brand’s Spring 2016 Couture collection.
Her love affair with Arab labels extends well beyond the red carpet too. Yousef Aljasmi provided the embellished bodysuit she sported in the Lemonade music video, meanwhile, Queen B chose a blue, beaded Georges Chakra gown to submerge herself underwater in Pretty Hurts. For the music video for her song Die With You released in honor of her and Jay Z’s ninth wedding anniversary, Beyoncé wore a turban by Tunisian milliner Donia Allegue.
Read Next: How Beyoncé Became the Most-Awarded Woman in Grammy History

10 of Queen Rania’s Most Timeless Ensembles

10 of Queen Rania’s Most Timeless Ensembles

Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Much adored for her humanitarian work as her impeccable sense of style, Queen Rania champions modest fashion like nobody else. A huge supporter of both established and young Arabic brands, her status as a style icon is laced with elegance and exquisite taste. Follow the pictorial journey through time below for a look at some of her most iconic looks to date.

A royal wedding
Queen Rania and King Abdullah II of Jordan on their wedding day in 1993. Photo: Instagram/@ido.962
For her wedding to Prince Abdullah, set in Zahran Palace in Amman, Jordan, in June 1993, Queen Rania wore a custom dress designed by British designer, Bruce Oldfield. With an opulent white headpiece with matching veil, the dress featured intricate gold embroidered detailing and inspired many a bride for years to come.
Diamonds are a woman’s best friend
Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
For the coronation of King Abdullah II, Queen Rania wore an intricate gold Elie Saab gown with a beautiful diamond tiara, which she chose to re-wear for her husband’s ten year anniversary on the throne, demonstrating her timeless sense of style.
Haute in haute couture
Queen Rania at Fashion for Relief in Cannes. Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Queen Rania at the Fashion for Relief event at Cannes, wearing a delicate white Givenchy haute couture dress with lace detailing offset by simple jewelry and a ladylike box clutch.
Also Read: 12 Times Queen Rania and King Abdullah II Made Us Believe in Love Again
Tasteful turquoise
“With His Majesty at the Great Arab Revolt centennial celebration earlier today.” Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Queen Rania arrived at the Great Arab Revolt Centennial, wearing a deep teal dress with gold embroidery, accessorized perfectly with turquoise drop earrings, a cream quilted clutch, and black heels.
Championing local creatives
Queen Rania in Hama Fashion at Jordan’s 70th Independence Day. Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
A huge supporter of Arab brands, Queen Rania wore a gown by Jordanian-Palestinian label, Hama Fashion, to celebrate Jordan’s 70th Independence Day. Primarily solid in color, the bottom portion featured a striking peek of a star print.
Showcasing Jordanian handicraft internationally
Queen Rania on an official visit to the Netherlands. Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
On 20th March 2018, on an official visit to the Netherlands, Queen Rania wore a traditional Jordanian handmade crafted by the women of the Basmet Al-Khair Charitable society.
All that shines
The Jordanian Royals at the Statesman-Award ceremony in Washington DC. Photo: @queenrania
Shimmering in an Ermanno Scervino wool suit embellished with glitter from the FW 19-20 collection, Queen Rania was a picture of contemporary elegance at an awards ceremony in New York last November, pairing the classic Prince of Wales check motif with a crystal belt and black Bottega Veneta clutch.
Desert hues
Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
A lesson in keeping—and looking—cool in the blistering desert heat, Her Highness dons a monochromatic palette of warm beige tones with matching accessories to boot.
Signature staple
Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Time and tested through the years, Queen Rania’s signature silhouette of a pencil skirt and collared shirt is proof all you need are a few strong wardrobe staples to have a constant supply of effortlessly put-together looks. Plus, who can say no to a matching set like this striped two-piece from Italian designer Sara Battaglia?
Picture-perfect pastels
Queen Rania before welcoming the Swedish Royals on their visit to Jordan in 2018. Photo: Rex
A sartorial embodiment of springtime blooms, Queen Rania steps out in a baby pink Ralph & Russo ensemble complete with soft pleats and a high-neck bow for a picture-perfect moment of ladylike grace.
Read Next: 5 Valuable Life Lessons According to Queen Rania  

6 Designers Share What Emirati Women’s Day Means to Them During UAE’s Year of the 50th

6 Designers Share What Emirati Women’s Day Means to Them During UAE’s Year of the 50th

The UAE has long been heralded as a pillar of gender equality in the region. From aiming to reduce the gender gap across all government sectors including the Federal National Council, empowering women to enroll in not only higher education but also in STEM courses, and requiring equal pay and female representation in decision-making boardrooms, the UAE is constantly progressing with new policies and programs to continue promoting equal opportunities for men and women.
On August 28, we celebrate Emirati Women’s Day in honor of HH Sheikha Fatima bint Mubarak, Chairwoman of the General Women’s Union and President of the Supreme Council for Motherhood and Childhood’s mission to recognize the key role women play in shaping the future of the country. Vogue Arabia reached out to some of the nation’s most celebrated designers to explore what they believe the future of fashion will look like in this ever-evolving landscape and the advice they have for young Emirati women who hope to join them in their quest to inspire creative change.

Sara Tamimi
Emirati designer Sara Tamimi. Photographed by Julia Chernih
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
For me, it’s a day when women need to guide and uplift each other. We should lead every girl and woman around us to help her achieve her goals and dreams. Sometimes, it’s as simple as helping them see what they are gifted in. The adventure of leading another women towards her path to success is even more rewarding than having found our own. Emirati women who found their source of empowerment can create a domino effect for those around them, we have seen that play out in the last 50 years and should maximize on this effect for the next 50.
I will be spending the day with my family, my mother and my sisters mostly, celebrating the great women I have around me who have inspired and guided me to be the woman I am today.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
What makes me proud to be an Emirati woman is the fact that the possibilities are endless. Being a woman doesn’t restrict me from pursuing my dreams. It makes me proud that Emirati woman can choose to follow her dreams, whether it’s designing a collection or preparing for the next space mission like Nora Al Matrooshi.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world?
My hope for the region is that it continues to build the growing platform of a sustainable fashion using the regions natural resources and setting new standards in the industry and leading the way forward in the years to come.
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
My sister, Noor Al Tamimi. She has and will always will be my inspiration. She is someone I aspire to be like and look up to in every way possible. To me, she exemplifies what it means to be an Emirati woman with an active role in society; realizing her dreams and embracing every opportunity. She founded a successful business that spread across the UAE and expanded globally. And she did so as a hands on mother, with humility, kindness and patience; values that I hold dearly to my heart.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
I felt life was going too fast and we compromised a lot of what we value as humans did not suit our nature. I believe now is the time to appreciate quality over anything else, we need to experience time and true luxury again and stop taking fashion forgranted.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
Covid-19 is a turning point in all our lives. As the world continues to adjust to the new normal, clothing brands will also need to evolve and adapt to the circumstances of the world. That is what fashion is about, it’s speaking to people in a certain place an time; an expression through clothing.
Back to back collections that brands have been pushing made it difficult for us to appreciate the beauty of each one, as we constantly rushed from one collection to the next. We need to change that and produce less, put more thought into it, and make it better and sustainable for the people and the environment.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
I really believe moving forward post-Covid-19, demand for luxury and experience will increase and I dare say it may even go to the extravagance of the roaring 20s.
Noora Shawqi
Noora Shawqi. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
As a mother and an entrepreneur, it brings immense joy to have a day dedicated to us that shows how the women of the country are constantly valued for our strength and efforts. With two young children, I’m trying to be mindful of the situation so this year I’ll just be celebrating at home with my immediate family.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
I’m proud of how much our beautiful country has thrived and achieved in these years. It is an honor to be able to represent it and showcase to the world the many talents and craftsmanship of our country!
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world in the wake of this pandemic?
Do your research and have a plan in place. It’s not easy being in a creative industry so make sure to surround yourself with people who support you 100% of the way.
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
The Emirati women I’m surrounded with inspire me the most. Their energy and accomplishments are my biggest inspiration. Some of them are Aisha Sharaf, owner of Pastryology, Noora Taher from Nafs Design, Shatha Essa, Fatma Taher of Maureen and many more. They all inspire me in many ways; especially their drive and great representation as role models of Emirati women.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
The past year has been unexpected in many ways, but we should take these as opportunities to learn and not to give up. Giving up might be the easy way out but learning from them and taking it as a challenge is rewarding once you overcome it.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
It allowed me to slow down and have more time to design which I really enjoyed. In the past, it was always hard to find the time to just sit down on my own and design. I’m hoping I can keep that up in the future but already my schedule is filling up!
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
I would like to see brands develop seasonless collections that are less trend-based and more focused on wearability and sustainability.
Noor, Budoor and Sarah Al Khaja of Serrb
Serrb AW2020 collection. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
We believe that every day is Women’s Day but sometimes we get caught up in life and take things for granted. So it’s a chance to stop, celebrate, and appreciate the people that we are and the people who we’ve become.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
We appreciate the good care and support that has been always given to the people; especially during the pandemic.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world in the wake of this pandemic?
Never be afraid to voice out your thoughts and opinions. There is always someone who is interested. And if you find the courage to believe in yourself then nothing can stop you.
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
We look up to every woman who is driven, passionate and is looking to further develop herself and her community.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
The value of taking things slow, taking care of one’s health and spending quality time alone and with family.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
It has led to us focusing more on local suppliers, as well as to support other local businesses to remain open.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
We believe in the near future, fashion will move in the direction of more versatile, timeless pieces.
Latifa AlGurg of Twisted Roots
Latifa AlGurg of Twisted Roots. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
It’s a chance to celebrate all the strong women who have contributed to building and sustaining this great nation. I’ll be enjoying quality time with my immediate family to celebrate the day.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
The UAE has a longstanding tradition of welcoming, accepting and learning from other cultures. I believe that this has been a key factor in nation’s growth and success. I feel immense pride that this so ingrained in both our culture and people that the country has become a home to people from every other nation in the world. A home that they not only live in, but a home that they are proud to be a part of.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world?
Prepare whatever you can ahead and take your time building a strong understanding of your identity, goals, and pathways. The stronger your foundation, the more enjoyable the journey.
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
There are so many inspiring Emirati women. Just to name a few, HH Sheikha Fatima Bint Mubarak, the Mother of the Nation, HE Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi, Sarah Al-Amiri, and HE Reem Al Hashimi. These women are inspirational to us all. In addition, the UAE has a long history of strong women raising strong families. These women have set the precedent for the community to grow and prosper into the nation we are now so proud of.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
Every experience is a gift. Learn what you can from them. I’ve also learned so much from the people around me, and how beautiful and important human connection is.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
We had to take everything online, which surprisingly created for a more focused discussion. This has helped us keep track of the collection development process, so I think we will adopt this system for collection development as a permanent fixture to be more effective.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
Prior to the pandemic, there was a shift towards the appreciation of more of a slow fashion model involving craftsmanship and quality, and I think the pandemic has highlighted this even more, with people considering what they are purchasing more carefully and shifting away from higher consumption rates.
Yasmin Al Mulla
Yasmin Al Mulla. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
It is a dear day by all means. We are so blessed and fortunate to live in this beautiful country, where women take their chances in all aspects, where women’s voices are being heard, and where women are being treated as gems. We are being celebrated every single day by just living in the UAE, so everyday is nothing but a celebration for us.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
Being an Emirati woman means that you are strong, capable, worthy, and valuable in all forms. I am thankful for the priceless opportunities, overwhelming support, and perpetual privileges. Let’s work together to represent our country beautifully.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world in the wake of this pandemic?
You are living in a country where women are being supported in all aspects. Use your chances, study the market, fulfill the missing gap, and incorporate your passion through your education and career. But always remember that there is a room for everyone. We rise by lifting others!
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
Every single woman who appreciates her education, treasure her dreams and believe in her goals.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
Above all, what matters most after health and family; is having a strong community, great countries, and a world that contains us.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
The future of fashion is shifting into a whole new direction, as we are never coming out of this the same. But stronger, with brighter ideas, and valued directions. It is about elevating our strongest products, and filling the missing gap in the market; it’s all about e-commerce and sustainable production.  It is as well about renewed interest in clothing items as the consumers are shifting into nothing but timeless pieces—smart quality shopping rather than quantity.
Sheikha Madiyah Al Sharqi
Madiyah Al Sharqi at Ounass. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you?
I think it’s about celebrating every woman’s achievements and inspiring others with those breakthroughs. It’s a testament to how empowered women are in the UAE, and how we always strive to be a progressive community.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world?
In any profession, I think it requires a lot of passion to enjoy what you do. Now more than ever, it’s so important to be able to embrace constant change and be inventive in such a fluctuating landscape.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
I’ve found new meaning in getting creative; it’s pushed us out of our comfort zones to explore new ways to present a collection next season. When it comes to the design process, I believe we have already started heading in the direction by incorporating more seasonless items into the collection that aren’t trend-driven, so we will continue in that direction.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
My hope is we’ll come out of this more conscious and mindful of the way we consume fashion—investing in quality, design, and the craftspeople behind it.
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Queen Rania Wore This Meghan Markle-Loved Lebanese Shoe Designer to Celebrate Jordan’s Independence Day

Queen Rania Wore This Meghan Markle-Loved Lebanese Shoe Designer to Celebrate Jordan’s Independence Day

https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2https://en.vogue.me/wp-content/themes/vogue2HM Queen Rania and HM King Abdullah. Photo: Instagram/@queenraniaAs Jordanians marked their country’s 75th Independence Day on Tuesday, May 25, the royal family came together at a special ceremony at Raghadan Palace. Attended by HM Queen Rania, HM King Abdullah, and HRH Crown Prince Hussein and Princess Salma, the event saw 140 Jordanians who “participated in building the nation and its institutions,” awarded with centennial medals by the King.
Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
For the occasion, Queen Rania was dressed in an elegant ensemble courtesy of Arab designers. Her black embroidered kaftan with olive green accents was paired with accessories of the same color. Held in Queen Rania’s hands was the Lotus clutch by Egyptian handbag label Nuniz. Helmed by designer Nadia Zarkani, the brand is known for its handcrafted pieces made in Cairo and counts actor Hend Sabri among its fans.
Once again championing one of her favorite footwear designers, Queen Rania wore a pair of Olive Green Suede Lorenzo 105 Heels by Jennifer Chamandi. The Lebanese creative’s eponymous and royal-approved label has also been spotted on Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex. “Seeing Queen Rania in my shoes is always an incredible moment,” shared Chamandi with Vogue Arabia. “When designing, women like Queen Rania are always front of mind – women on a mission who work to lift up and empower other women around them. It is always an honor to have these amazing women wearing my shoes and as a working mother, it fills me with pride for my daughters to see such a role model in my designs.”
Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Besides her philanthropic work, the Queen is known for her timeless sense of style which often highlights regional designers. Click through the gallery below to see some of her best looks.

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