Arab designer

10 of Queen Rania’s Most Timeless Ensembles

10 of Queen Rania’s Most Timeless Ensembles

Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Much adored for her humanitarian work as her impeccable sense of style, Queen Rania champions modest fashion like nobody else. A huge supporter of both established and young Arabic brands, her status as a style icon is laced with elegance and exquisite taste. Follow the pictorial journey through time below for a look at some of her most iconic looks to date.

A royal wedding
Queen Rania and King Abdullah II of Jordan on their wedding day in 1993. Photo: Instagram/@ido.962
For her wedding to Prince Abdullah, set in Zahran Palace in Amman, Jordan, in June 1993, Queen Rania wore a custom dress designed by British designer, Bruce Oldfield. With an opulent white headpiece with matching veil, the dress featured intricate gold embroidered detailing and inspired many a bride for years to come.
Diamonds are a woman’s best friend
Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
For the coronation of King Abdullah II, Queen Rania wore an intricate gold Elie Saab gown with a beautiful diamond tiara, which she chose to re-wear for her husband’s ten year anniversary on the throne, demonstrating her timeless sense of style.
Haute in haute couture
Queen Rania at Fashion for Relief in Cannes. Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Queen Rania at the Fashion for Relief event at Cannes, wearing a delicate white Givenchy haute couture dress with lace detailing offset by simple jewelry and a ladylike box clutch.
Also Read: 12 Times Queen Rania and King Abdullah II Made Us Believe in Love Again
Tasteful turquoise
“With His Majesty at the Great Arab Revolt centennial celebration earlier today.” Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Queen Rania arrived at the Great Arab Revolt Centennial, wearing a deep teal dress with gold embroidery, accessorized perfectly with turquoise drop earrings, a cream quilted clutch, and black heels.
Championing local creatives
Queen Rania in Hama Fashion at Jordan’s 70th Independence Day. Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
A huge supporter of Arab brands, Queen Rania wore a gown by Jordanian-Palestinian label, Hama Fashion, to celebrate Jordan’s 70th Independence Day. Primarily solid in color, the bottom portion featured a striking peek of a star print.
Showcasing Jordanian handicraft internationally
Queen Rania on an official visit to the Netherlands. Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
On 20th March 2018, on an official visit to the Netherlands, Queen Rania wore a traditional Jordanian handmade crafted by the women of the Basmet Al-Khair Charitable society.
All that shines
The Jordanian Royals at the Statesman-Award ceremony in Washington DC. Photo: @queenrania
Shimmering in an Ermanno Scervino wool suit embellished with glitter from the FW 19-20 collection, Queen Rania was a picture of contemporary elegance at an awards ceremony in New York last November, pairing the classic Prince of Wales check motif with a crystal belt and black Bottega Veneta clutch.
Desert hues
Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
A lesson in keeping—and looking—cool in the blistering desert heat, Her Highness dons a monochromatic palette of warm beige tones with matching accessories to boot.
Signature staple
Photo: Instagram/@queenrania
Time and tested through the years, Queen Rania’s signature silhouette of a pencil skirt and collared shirt is proof all you need are a few strong wardrobe staples to have a constant supply of effortlessly put-together looks. Plus, who can say no to a matching set like this striped two-piece from Italian designer Sara Battaglia?
Picture-perfect pastels
Queen Rania before welcoming the Swedish Royals on their visit to Jordan in 2018. Photo: Rex
A sartorial embodiment of springtime blooms, Queen Rania steps out in a baby pink Ralph & Russo ensemble complete with soft pleats and a high-neck bow for a picture-perfect moment of ladylike grace.
Read Next: 5 Valuable Life Lessons According to Queen Rania  

6 Designers Share What Emirati Women’s Day Means to Them During UAE’s Year of the 50th

6 Designers Share What Emirati Women’s Day Means to Them During UAE’s Year of the 50th

The UAE has long been heralded as a pillar of gender equality in the region. From aiming to reduce the gender gap across all government sectors including the Federal National Council, empowering women to enroll in not only higher education but also in STEM courses, and requiring equal pay and female representation in decision-making boardrooms, the UAE is constantly progressing with new policies and programs to continue promoting equal opportunities for men and women.
On August 28, we celebrate Emirati Women’s Day in honor of HH Sheikha Fatima bint Mubarak, Chairwoman of the General Women’s Union and President of the Supreme Council for Motherhood and Childhood’s mission to recognize the key role women play in shaping the future of the country. Vogue Arabia reached out to some of the nation’s most celebrated designers to explore what they believe the future of fashion will look like in this ever-evolving landscape and the advice they have for young Emirati women who hope to join them in their quest to inspire creative change.

Sara Tamimi
Emirati designer Sara Tamimi. Photographed by Julia Chernih
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
For me, it’s a day when women need to guide and uplift each other. We should lead every girl and woman around us to help her achieve her goals and dreams. Sometimes, it’s as simple as helping them see what they are gifted in. The adventure of leading another women towards her path to success is even more rewarding than having found our own. Emirati women who found their source of empowerment can create a domino effect for those around them, we have seen that play out in the last 50 years and should maximize on this effect for the next 50.
I will be spending the day with my family, my mother and my sisters mostly, celebrating the great women I have around me who have inspired and guided me to be the woman I am today.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
What makes me proud to be an Emirati woman is the fact that the possibilities are endless. Being a woman doesn’t restrict me from pursuing my dreams. It makes me proud that Emirati woman can choose to follow her dreams, whether it’s designing a collection or preparing for the next space mission like Nora Al Matrooshi.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world?
My hope for the region is that it continues to build the growing platform of a sustainable fashion using the regions natural resources and setting new standards in the industry and leading the way forward in the years to come.
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
My sister, Noor Al Tamimi. She has and will always will be my inspiration. She is someone I aspire to be like and look up to in every way possible. To me, she exemplifies what it means to be an Emirati woman with an active role in society; realizing her dreams and embracing every opportunity. She founded a successful business that spread across the UAE and expanded globally. And she did so as a hands on mother, with humility, kindness and patience; values that I hold dearly to my heart.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
I felt life was going too fast and we compromised a lot of what we value as humans did not suit our nature. I believe now is the time to appreciate quality over anything else, we need to experience time and true luxury again and stop taking fashion forgranted.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
Covid-19 is a turning point in all our lives. As the world continues to adjust to the new normal, clothing brands will also need to evolve and adapt to the circumstances of the world. That is what fashion is about, it’s speaking to people in a certain place an time; an expression through clothing.
Back to back collections that brands have been pushing made it difficult for us to appreciate the beauty of each one, as we constantly rushed from one collection to the next. We need to change that and produce less, put more thought into it, and make it better and sustainable for the people and the environment.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
I really believe moving forward post-Covid-19, demand for luxury and experience will increase and I dare say it may even go to the extravagance of the roaring 20s.
Noora Shawqi
Noora Shawqi. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
As a mother and an entrepreneur, it brings immense joy to have a day dedicated to us that shows how the women of the country are constantly valued for our strength and efforts. With two young children, I’m trying to be mindful of the situation so this year I’ll just be celebrating at home with my immediate family.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
I’m proud of how much our beautiful country has thrived and achieved in these years. It is an honor to be able to represent it and showcase to the world the many talents and craftsmanship of our country!
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world in the wake of this pandemic?
Do your research and have a plan in place. It’s not easy being in a creative industry so make sure to surround yourself with people who support you 100% of the way.
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
The Emirati women I’m surrounded with inspire me the most. Their energy and accomplishments are my biggest inspiration. Some of them are Aisha Sharaf, owner of Pastryology, Noora Taher from Nafs Design, Shatha Essa, Fatma Taher of Maureen and many more. They all inspire me in many ways; especially their drive and great representation as role models of Emirati women.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
The past year has been unexpected in many ways, but we should take these as opportunities to learn and not to give up. Giving up might be the easy way out but learning from them and taking it as a challenge is rewarding once you overcome it.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
It allowed me to slow down and have more time to design which I really enjoyed. In the past, it was always hard to find the time to just sit down on my own and design. I’m hoping I can keep that up in the future but already my schedule is filling up!
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
I would like to see brands develop seasonless collections that are less trend-based and more focused on wearability and sustainability.
Noor, Budoor and Sarah Al Khaja of Serrb
Serrb AW2020 collection. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
We believe that every day is Women’s Day but sometimes we get caught up in life and take things for granted. So it’s a chance to stop, celebrate, and appreciate the people that we are and the people who we’ve become.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
We appreciate the good care and support that has been always given to the people; especially during the pandemic.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world in the wake of this pandemic?
Never be afraid to voice out your thoughts and opinions. There is always someone who is interested. And if you find the courage to believe in yourself then nothing can stop you.
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
We look up to every woman who is driven, passionate and is looking to further develop herself and her community.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
The value of taking things slow, taking care of one’s health and spending quality time alone and with family.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
It has led to us focusing more on local suppliers, as well as to support other local businesses to remain open.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
We believe in the near future, fashion will move in the direction of more versatile, timeless pieces.
Latifa AlGurg of Twisted Roots
Latifa AlGurg of Twisted Roots. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
It’s a chance to celebrate all the strong women who have contributed to building and sustaining this great nation. I’ll be enjoying quality time with my immediate family to celebrate the day.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
The UAE has a longstanding tradition of welcoming, accepting and learning from other cultures. I believe that this has been a key factor in nation’s growth and success. I feel immense pride that this so ingrained in both our culture and people that the country has become a home to people from every other nation in the world. A home that they not only live in, but a home that they are proud to be a part of.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world?
Prepare whatever you can ahead and take your time building a strong understanding of your identity, goals, and pathways. The stronger your foundation, the more enjoyable the journey.
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
There are so many inspiring Emirati women. Just to name a few, HH Sheikha Fatima Bint Mubarak, the Mother of the Nation, HE Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi, Sarah Al-Amiri, and HE Reem Al Hashimi. These women are inspirational to us all. In addition, the UAE has a long history of strong women raising strong families. These women have set the precedent for the community to grow and prosper into the nation we are now so proud of.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
Every experience is a gift. Learn what you can from them. I’ve also learned so much from the people around me, and how beautiful and important human connection is.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
We had to take everything online, which surprisingly created for a more focused discussion. This has helped us keep track of the collection development process, so I think we will adopt this system for collection development as a permanent fixture to be more effective.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
Prior to the pandemic, there was a shift towards the appreciation of more of a slow fashion model involving craftsmanship and quality, and I think the pandemic has highlighted this even more, with people considering what they are purchasing more carefully and shifting away from higher consumption rates.
Yasmin Al Mulla
Yasmin Al Mulla. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you? Will you be celebrating it any differently this year?
It is a dear day by all means. We are so blessed and fortunate to live in this beautiful country, where women take their chances in all aspects, where women’s voices are being heard, and where women are being treated as gems. We are being celebrated every single day by just living in the UAE, so everyday is nothing but a celebration for us.
As the UAE celebrates 50 years in 2021, what is it about the country that makes you proud to be Emirati?
Being an Emirati woman means that you are strong, capable, worthy, and valuable in all forms. I am thankful for the priceless opportunities, overwhelming support, and perpetual privileges. Let’s work together to represent our country beautifully.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world in the wake of this pandemic?
You are living in a country where women are being supported in all aspects. Use your chances, study the market, fulfill the missing gap, and incorporate your passion through your education and career. But always remember that there is a room for everyone. We rise by lifting others!
Who are the Emirati women you look up to?
Every single woman who appreciates her education, treasure her dreams and believe in her goals.
What are some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past year?
Above all, what matters most after health and family; is having a strong community, great countries, and a world that contains us.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
The future of fashion is shifting into a whole new direction, as we are never coming out of this the same. But stronger, with brighter ideas, and valued directions. It is about elevating our strongest products, and filling the missing gap in the market; it’s all about e-commerce and sustainable production.  It is as well about renewed interest in clothing items as the consumers are shifting into nothing but timeless pieces—smart quality shopping rather than quantity.
Sheikha Madiyah Al Sharqi
Madiyah Al Sharqi at Ounass. Photo: Supplied
What does Emirati Women’s Day mean to you?
I think it’s about celebrating every woman’s achievements and inspiring others with those breakthroughs. It’s a testament to how empowered women are in the UAE, and how we always strive to be a progressive community.
What advice would you give young Emirati women who are planning to join the creative world?
In any profession, I think it requires a lot of passion to enjoy what you do. Now more than ever, it’s so important to be able to embrace constant change and be inventive in such a fluctuating landscape.
How has Covid-19 affected your design process and creativity overall? Were there any changes that you see becoming more permanent fixtures?
I’ve found new meaning in getting creative; it’s pushed us out of our comfort zones to explore new ways to present a collection next season. When it comes to the design process, I believe we have already started heading in the direction by incorporating more seasonless items into the collection that aren’t trend-driven, so we will continue in that direction.
Describe what you think the future of fashion will look like in a post-pandemic world.
My hope is we’ll come out of this more conscious and mindful of the way we consume fashion—investing in quality, design, and the craftspeople behind it.
Read Next: Exclusive: Nardine Farag and More Join Egyptian Label Mamzi in Supporting Frontline Heroes

The Arab Labels to Look Out for at This Sun-Inspired Pop-Up in Cannes

The Arab Labels to Look Out for at This Sun-Inspired Pop-Up in Cannes

Nalu silk dress, Saint Bag bag, and Elda jewels bracelet. Photo: Ismael Nebchi
The Follow the Sun! pop-up this year is all set to feature ready-to-wear, swimwear, accessories, and summer essentials by handpicked Arab designer brands. Alongside the Cannes film festival, the sixth edition of the summer pop-up event will take place at Tamaris Plage on the famous Croisette street in Cannes, France. Between July 6 and 18, the sun-drenched traveling concept aims to connect potential like-minded shoppers with a curated roster of contemporary luxury fashion brands.
Vanina body and Panarehi sarong. Photo: Ismael Nebchi
Some of the featured artists and brands include Lebanese fashion designers Sandra Mansour and Gemy Maalouf, Ukranian fashion designer Ekaterina Kukhareva, Peruvian swimwear brand Capittana, Turkish label Alzuarr, and French label Serena Esse, among others.
Gemy Maalouf dress and Alzuarr shoes. Photo: Ismael Nebchi
Conceived and produced by Paris-based PR and consultancy agency Giorgia Viola Communication, the event in Cannes, strategically located in the Palm Beach, is a meeting point overlooking the bay and Lérins Islands, following successful editions held at Hotel Brach in Paris, Grand Bellevue Hotel in Gstaad in the Swiss Alps, and Nikki Beach in Dubai.
Serena Esse gold-sequined bodysuit and Aire Marino skirt. Photo: Ismael Nebchi
Production company Rêvarte, creating artistic content for luxury events and theater, together with Paris-based fitness concept Kalon Movement, will also conceive a fashion show with French Cabaret for Tamaris Plage on Bastille Day on July 14, and a signature workout session combining ballet, pilates, and cardio exercises, with the hotel’s restaurant proposing a delicious, healthy Mediterranean menu.
Read Next: Bella Hadid’s Cannes Look is Straight Off the Couture Runway
Model: Elvira Jain Makeup artist: Ivana Boni  Venue: Ecrin Plage Cannes

Vogue Fashion Prize Winner Benchellal’s SS21 Collection Effortlessly Combines Sustainability and Glamor

Vogue Fashion Prize Winner Benchellal’s SS21 Collection Effortlessly Combines Sustainability and Glamor

Photo: Courtesy of Benchellal
“Sustainability is a core value of the Benchellal brand,” starts its founder and designer, Mohamed Benchellal. He considers the challenges sourcing deadstock fabrics – filtering out the damaged parts, determining self-taught techniques of fabric manipulation, and economical cutting, to which patterns produce the least waste – what makes his everyday process so interesting. “This latest collection is no exception,” he continues. SS21 features couture-like separates and dresses that have all been made from leftover or discarded textiles. In fact, instead of creating a physical archival inventory at his Amsterdam atelier, he takes his previous-season garments and deconstructs them, to reassemble them for the new season. Such focus on living in the present is practically unheard of, especially for an industry that proclaims to be forward-facing and yet consistently revisits styles of decades past.
Mohamed Benchellal. Photo: Courtesy of Benchellal
“As a designer, you are always pushing boundaries. In the realm of evening wear, it can be a fine line between the magical and the ridiculous,” tells Benchellal. While focusing on the here and now, he reveals that his guiding light is a return to “timelessness.” Offering women statement garments – a reinterpretation of the kandora mixed with classic button-up shirt elements; voluminous translations of the scent of oud and the bakhoor smoke; lotus and Arabian jasmine-inspired petal-like volumes; or a tuxedo blazer over a floor-length dress in gold hand-painted canvas with wrapped sash around the hips – the Fashion Prize winner makes, for the first time, a direct link with the MENA heritage and his clothes.
Photo: Courtesy of Benchellal
The Moroccan designer, who grew up in the Netherlands, always searched for a way to reference his fascination with the region in his fashion. His recent stay in Dubai for the Fashion Prize ceremony offered him the boost to finally create a collection inspired by the landscapes, women, and colors of the region. Nomadic cobalt blue and saffron orange are added to his classic palette of black, white, and red, while his reinterpretation of the kandora, along with his signature volumes and draping, are a further nod to Arab women, whom he hopes will feel as though they are wearing armor in his clothes, giving confidence and a feeling of invincibility.
Photo: Courtesy of Benchellal
“Real glamour is about translating the feeling of ultimate freedom into a garment, it’s not about money,” he states. “It’s also about the opportunity to realize my goals by pursuing a career in fashion with the full support of my family along the way.” Even when a curfew was introduced in Amsterdam, he would work alone at his atelier, sleeping alongside his sewing machine until he was permitted to venture outside again. “Especially now, when life has slowed down and seems rather unexciting, it is fashion like this – a hopeful alternative to ordinary life – that can keep us striving towards a better future.”
Photo: Courtesy of Benchellal
Read Next: Inside the 2020 Vogue Fashion Prize, Powered By NEOM Awards Ceremony
Originally published in the April 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

Four Female Arab Jewelry Designers Present Their Artistic Creations

Four Female Arab Jewelry Designers Present Their Artistic Creations

Four female Arab jewelry designers find harmony between artistic instinct and cherished traditions. From minimalist to heritage pieces and bespoke geometrics, these are the creatives and brands you need on your radar. Zagh “Jewelry is a form of expression to me,” says Riham Zaghloul, one-time software engineer and now founder and designer of Zagh, a […]
The post Four Female Arab Jewelry Designers Present Their Artistic Creations appeared first on Vogue Arabia.

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com