Serena Coady

The FDA Just Approved a First-of-Its-Kind Drug for Chronic Yeast Infections

The FDA Just Approved a First-of-Its-Kind Drug for Chronic Yeast Infections

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first oral antifungal medication, called Vivjoa, to specifically treat recurrent vaginal yeast infections. The administration said in a report that the medication could help stop recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) for people “who are not of reproductive potential.” Around 5% of people with vaginas deal with RVVC, meaning they get four or more vaginal yeast infections each year, according to the U.S. Office on Women’s Health.A vaginal yeast infection is extremely uncomfortable and disruptive because it can result in itching and burning of the vulva (the area around the vagina), pain while urinating, pain during sex, and thick vaginal discharge. A yeast infection develops when the fungus Candida, which naturally exists in the vagina, grows excessively. Those who are more susceptible to recurrent vaginal yeast infections include people who are pregnant; people who regularly douche or use vaginal sprays; people who recently took steroids, antibiotics, or high-estrogen birth control; immunocompromised people, such as those with HIV; or people with uncontrolled diabetes. The medication should be taken two days in a row; 14 days after the first dose, it should be taken once a week for 11 weeks, according to Mycovia Pharmaceuticals, the maker of Vivjoa.The average vaginal yeast infection can usually be treated with over-the-counter antifungal medication, like Monistat or Vagisil, both of which are vaginal creams. The antifungal fluconazole (Diflucan), a tablet that is taken once, is often prescribed to treat yeast infections, though some people can become resistant to the drug over time, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Suppositories, which are inserted into the vagina, are also sometimes used to treat yeast infections.Historically, people with recurrent vaginal yeast infections haven’t had great treatment options. “Prior to its approval, the FDA-approved treatments on the market were only indicated for the treatment of an acute infection,” Leah. S. Millheiser, MD, FACOG, NCMP, tells SELF. “This approval is significant because, although not that common, recurrent vaginal yeast infections can be very distressing for an individual and can have a negative impact on overall quality of life.”As we previously mentioned, Vivjoa is only available to certain people who have been diagnosed with RVVC since it is not recommended for people of “reproductive potential.” Studies on animals have shown the drug can potentially cause damage to the fetus if you were to become pregnant while on the medication. According to the FDA, the drug is only recommended for people who are biologically female and postmenopausal or permanently infertile due to tubal ligation, hysterectomy, or other factors.Oteseconazole, the active ingredient in Vivjoa, inhibits the fungal growth that causes a yeast infection and was designed to treat recurrent infections, specifically. In two global studies, 93.3% and 96.1% of people with RVVC who were treated with Vivjoa did not experience a recurrent yeast infection in close to a year after taking the drug compared to 57.2% and 60.6% of people who were given a placebo. Across the FDA’s three clinical trials conducted before approval, a total of 580 people with RVVC aged between 18 to 44 years old were treated with Vivjoa for three months. Adverse reactions weren’t common: 0.2% of the people treated with Vivjoa reported allergic dermatitis (an allergic reaction that results in an uncomfortable skin rash) and less than 2% experienced headache and nausea. (While these were the most common side effects, the FDA says others are possible, so it’s important to have that discussion with your doctor before moving forward with the medication.)If you’re not sure whether your yeast infection situation warrants a drug like Vivjoa, talk to your primary care doctor or ob-gyn to see if it might be right for you. You shouldn’t have to put up with constant symptoms—so it’s important to advocate for the care you need and deserve by exploring all your options.Related:

Harry Styles Opens Up About Therapy and Letting Go of Shame

Harry Styles Opens Up About Therapy and Letting Go of Shame

Pop megastar Harry Styles, 28, has opened up about going to therapy after years of feeling like it wasn’t for him, in a recent interview published in Better Homes & Gardens. “I thought it meant that you were broken,” Styles told the magazine, which featured the singer as their June cover star. “I wanted to be the one who could say I didn’t need it,” he continued. Fortunately, his initial reluctance eventually eased, and five years ago, Styles says he started seeing a therapist. The sessions have allowed him to “open up rooms in himself,” he says.”I think that accepting living, being happy, hurting in the extremes, that is the most alive you can be. Losing it crying, losing it laughing—there’s no way, I don’t think, to feel more alive than that,” Styles said.During the COVID-19 pandemic—and the isolation that came with it—the former One Direction member felt compelled to dig even deeper. “In lockdown, I started processing a lot of stuff that happened when I was in the band,” Styles said. One Direction, which launched in 2010 thanks to Simon Cowell and the talent show The X Factor, quickly went on to earn millions of fans around the globe, according to Rolling Stone. In 2014, the band’s Where We Are Tour, in support of their album Midnight Memories, was the highest-grossing concert tour of the year, pulling in a massive $290 million, according to Forbes. It remains in the top 20 highest-grossing tours of all time. But by 2015, the band had gone on hiatus. In the interview, Styles elaborates on his time with the band, saying that he was often asked to share much of himself with the world, including childhood photographs that were given to The X Factor, “to get people to engage with you, to like you.”Instagram contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.

Selma Blair Reveals How Her Decades-Long Alcoholism Started at Age 7

Selma Blair Reveals How Her Decades-Long Alcoholism Started at Age 7

This article includes potentially triggering descriptions of sexual assault.Selma Blair, 49, revealed how her alcoholism began during childhood in her new memoir, Mean Baby, which goes on sale May 17. Blair, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2018, says she started experimenting with alcohol at seven years old and that it soon became a coping mechanism: “I don’t know if I would’ve survived childhood without alcoholism,” the actor told People in a new interview. She shared more details about her past with the outlet, which published an excerpted section of Mean Baby.One passage explores the roots of her alcoholism, recalling her introduction to Manischewitz, a sweet wine popular in the Jewish community. “I always liked Passover,” Blair wrote. “As I took the small sips of the Manischewitz I was allowed throughout the seder a light flooded through me, filling me up with the warmth of God. But the year I was seven, when we basically had Manischewitz on tap and no one was paying attention to my consumption level, I put it together: The feeling was not God but fermentation.” Eventually, Blair established a pattern of getting “very drunk” that continued into adulthood and stopped in 2016, when she became sober. She notes that anxiety was usually the trigger that led her to drink—“just quick sips whenever my anxiety would alight. I usually barely even got tipsy,” she writes, per People. “I became…adept at hiding my secret.”“That’s why it’s such a problem for a lot of people,” Blair told People. “It really is a huge comfort, a huge relief in the beginning. Maybe even the first few years for me because I did start really young with that as a comfort, as my coping mechanism.”Mean Baby also includes details about the sexual assaults Blair has experienced throughout her life, which were important for her to include in her memoir as part of the healing process, she says. She explained how she felt during one attack, which took place during her twenties: “I wish I could say what happened to me that night was an anomaly, but it wasn’t. I’ve been raped, multiple times, because I was too drunk to say the words, ‘Please. Stop.’”Outside of her therapist, nobody knew she’d been sexually assaulted multiple times, Blair told People. But, eventually, therapy equipped her with the tools she needed to write her memoir so she could share her story with a much wider audience. The experience of writing illuminated parts of her life she hadn’t considered, Blair said: “My sense of trauma was bigger than I knew. I did not realize that assault was so central in my life. I had so much shame and blame.”The creative process also became cathartic, helping her process past traumas, she said. “I’m grateful I felt safe enough to put it on the page. And can then work on it with a therapist and with other writing, and really relieve that burden of shame on myself.”If you or someone you love needs support due to substance use, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) website or call the national helpline at 1-800-662-4357. If you have been the victim of sexual assault, you can call the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800-656-4673 or chat online at online.rainn.org.Related:

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas Share First Photo of Daughter After 100 Days in NICU

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas Share First Photo of Daughter After 100 Days in NICU

Priyanka Chopra, 39, and husband Nick Jonas, 29, gave an update on their baby via Instagram over the weekend. They jointly shared a photo of their first child, Malti Marie Chopra Jones, who was born via a surrogate pregnancy in January. Chopra Jones was born 12 weeks early, and her parents reflected on their daughter’s first months of life in the caption: “On this Mother’s Day we can’t help but reflect on these last few months and the rollercoaster we’ve been on, which we now know, so many people have also experienced.”They went on to reveal their child had been released from the hospital after more than 100 days in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). “Every family’s journey is unique and requires a certain level of faith, and while ours was a challenging few months, what becomes abundantly clear, in retrospect, is how precious and perfect every moment is,” they wrote.The couple, who married in December 2018, thanked their daughter’s medical team for their support: “We are overjoyed that our little girl is finally home, and just want to thank every doctor, nurse and specialist at Rady Children’s La Jolla and Cedar Sinai, Los Angeles, who were there selflessly every step of the way.”Instagram contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.Their daughter’s birth was considered preterm, meaning it occurred before 37 weeks of pregnancy had been completed. In 2020, one in every 10 infants born in the U.S. was preterm, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Because babies born preterm do not have sufficient time to develop in the womb, their liver, lungs, and brain aren’t always fully formed at the time of birth, per the CDC. This can lead to respiratory issues, cerebral palsy, development delay, and vision problems, among other issues; the CDC reports that babies born before 32 weeks of pregnancy have higher rates of disability and death.Warning signs of preterm birth include change in vaginal discharge, pelvic pressure, low backache, cramps and contractions that occur before 37 weeks, and abdominal cramps that may include diarrhea, per the CDC. While many circumstances can result in preterm birth—and some causes aren’t well understood—the CDC recommends following certain precautions to reduce your risk. These include smoking cessation, avoiding alcohol and drugs while pregnant, starting prenatal care immediately when you suspect you’re pregnant, and seeking medical attention if you experience warning signs of preterm labor.Related: 

Ohio State University Issues Warning About Fake Adderall Pills After Student Deaths

Ohio State University Issues Warning About Fake Adderall Pills After Student Deaths

Two Ohio State University (OSU) students passed away on Thursday and Friday, and the school issued an urgent safety message to the community warning about fake Adderall pills. OSU didn’t release the official cause of death in either case, but the statement announcing the first fatality urged students to “be aware of the possibility of contaminated drugs in our community.” It also said a third student had been hospitalized and then released.“This morning Columbus Public Health shared an alert about fake Adderall pills, which appear to contain fentanyl, causing an increase in overdoses and hospitalizations,” the safety message said. Adderall is a brand-name mixture of two types of drugs: amphetamines and dextroamphetamines, per the U.S. National Library of Medicine. It’s often prescribed to people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but taking Adderall without a prescription has become a problem on college campuses throughout the U.S., according to a 2018 article in the Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education. “The presence of prescription stimulants on college campuses has risen significantly in recent years,” the authors of the article wrote. They explained that many students take Adderall with the hopes it will help them study for longer periods of time, but warned that taking the drug without a prescription can be dangerous.Like any counterfeit drugs, Adderall accessed without a prescription can be laced with other substances, such as fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that’s up to 100 times stronger than morphine, per the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Heroin is also often laced with fentanyl to increase its potency, leading to unintentional overdose deaths, according to the DEA, which estimates that 4 of every 10 pills laced with fentanyl contain a potentially lethal dose. This can be as little as 2 milligrams, depending on a person’s size, according to the DEA. “Counterfeit pills may contain lethal amounts of fentanyl or methamphetamine and are extremely dangerous because they often appear identical to legitimate prescription pills, and the user is likely unaware of how lethal they can be,” according to the DEA. OSU’s safety message reiterated that using a contaminated drug just one time can result in death.Synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, now cause more overdose deaths in the U.S. than any other substance, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). In 2020, 91,799 overdose deaths were reported, and certain synthetic opioids—primarily fentanyl—caused 56,516 of those fatalities, per NIDA.A fentanyl overdose can cause a person’s breathing to slow or stop, decreasing the amount of oxygen that gets to the brain, according to NIDA. This causes a condition called hypoxia, which can lead to a coma, permanent brain damage, or death.OSU’s safety message reminded students they can confidentially pick up fentanyl test strips, which can determine whether a substance has been laced with the synthetic opioid, at Student Health Services. It also reminded students they can confidentially access Naloxone, a nasal spray or injectable medication that, if used quickly, can reverse an opioid overdose.Related:

Here’s Why the FDA Has Restricted Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 Vaccine

Here’s Why the FDA Has Restricted Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 Vaccine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is limiting the use of the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, according to a statement published Thursday. The J&J COVID-19 vaccine has been linked to thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS), a rare, potentially life-threatening condition that causes blood clots. Now, only people 18 years or older in two different groups will be able to get the J&J vaccine.The first group includes anyone who otherwise wouldn’t get a COVID-19 vaccine (in other words, individuals who will only receive the J&J vaccine due to personal preference). The second includes individuals “for whom other approved COVID-19 vaccines are not accessible or clinically appropriate.” Those affected include people who suffered an anaphylactic reaction (a severe allergic reaction that can cause symptoms like skin rash and difficulty breathing) to either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, the only other COVID-19 vaccines approved for use in the U.S. Per the FDA statement, the benefits of getting the J&J vaccine outweigh the risks of remaining unvaccinated for these individuals. The FDA update aligns with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which has recommended the use of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna over the J&J vaccine since December 2021.The decision follows an FDA review, which was referenced in its statement of reported cases of TTS occurring after a J&J vaccine. “After conducting an updated analysis, evaluation, and investigation of reported cases, the FDA has determined that the risk…warrants limiting the authorized use of the vaccine,” the statement said. The J&J COVID-19 vaccine first received emergency use authorization from the FDA in February 2021. Two months later, the FDA and CDC paused the use of the vaccine when six cases of TTS linked to the J&J vaccine were reported. Health care providers were then informed of these risks so they could appropriately plan for the possibility of TTS since it requires specific treatment. The FDA then lifted the pause. TTS occurs when blood clots form alongside low platelet counts, according to a 2021 CDC report. (Platelets are a type of blood cell, and low platelet counts can cause internal bleeding.) Blood clots can potentially lead to heart attack, stroke, or death. Symptoms to look out for include pain and swelling in limbs, chest pain, numbness on one side of the body, and an abrupt change in mental faculties, among others. TTS is primarily diagnosed through blood tests and imaging tests, including MRI or ultrasound, and it’s a very rare complication of the J&J COVID-19 vaccine; the FDA estimates that TTS occurs in 3.23 people per every million who receive the vaccine. Even fewer people die from TTS following a J&J vaccine: “The reporting rate of TTS deaths is 0.48 per million doses of vaccine administered,” the FDA statement said. Experts have also said that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can also cause blood clots: A 2020 systematic review and meta-analysis of 42 studies that included more than 8,000 people found that the risk of thromboembolism (TE), which occurs when blood vessels are obstructed by a blood clot, is significant. “TE rates of COVID-19 are high and associated with a higher risk of death,” the researchers wrote. The new report highlights the fact that continuous research is being done to determine the safest and best vaccination practices to protect people from severe illness and death from COVID-19.Related:

Sophie Turner Had Her Therapist Move In to Help Her Heal From an Eating Disorder

Sophie Turner Had Her Therapist Move In to Help Her Heal From an Eating Disorder

Sophie Turner, 26, opened up about her struggle with an eating disorder in a new interview with Elle UK. The actor told the outlet her therapist moved into her home to help her heal. “For a long time, I was quite sick with an eating disorder, and I had a companion…. It’s a live-in therapist, who would ensure I wasn’t doing anything unhealthy with my eating habits,” she said.Turner, who is currently expecting her second child with husband Joe Jonas, said being a public figure played a role in the development of her negative self-image, calling out social media specifically as harmful to her mental health. “I have a love-hate relationship with social media. I wish I’d never got myself involved with it in the first place,” Turner said. She added that her eating disorder was fueled by hurtful comments made online. “I look at the comments on Instagram and think, ‘Everyone thinks this about me.’ One night, I was playing over and over in my mind a comment I’d seen on Instagram. I was like, ‘I’m so fat, I’m so undesirable,’ and spinning out.”This is where her live-in therapist came in helpful: “She said to me, ‘You know, no one actually cares. I know you think this, but nobody else is thinking it. You’re not that important,’” Turner said. “That was the best thing anyone could have told me.”Although 24/7 access to therapy is likely inaccessible for many, there are many other ways to get help for an eating disorder. The first line of defense could be psychotherapy (also known as talk therapy), according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). This could mean individual, group, or family therapy. Health care providers sometimes also recommend nutrition counseling to help people reach—and then maintain—a healthy weight. Antidepressants or mood stabilizers may also be recommended, per the NLM, as could treatment plans for health complications caused by eating disorders. Turner said she now attends a weekly individual therapy session. “I still have to do it every week…I still have days when I feel depressed or anxious.”She said social media has impacted her mental health in addition to contributing to her eating disorder. “I have noticed that social media makes me incredibly anxious, and it’s something I try to distance myself from,” Turner, who has nearly 15 million Instagram followers, explained. Turner said deleting social media apps from her phone has helped: “Having it off my phone has been so helpful. Now, if I do have to go on it, it’s for a few minutes once or twice a week, rather than hours every day. It’s made such a difference.”If you’re struggling with an eating disorder, you can find support and resources from the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA). If you are in a crisis, you can text “NEDA” to 741741 to be connected with a trained volunteer at Crisis Text Line for immediate support. Related:

Pink Says Her Panic Attack Symptoms Used to Land Her in the Hospital

Pink Says Her Panic Attack Symptoms Used to Land Her in the Hospital

For decades, Pink has been known for her fearless stage persona, but she still has her share of vulnerabilities like any other person. For Mental Health Awareness Month, the “All I Know So Far” singer opened up about the debilitating panic attacks she used to live with—and why talking about it is so important.“I used to get pretty awful panic attacks and I didn’t know what was happening. I didn’t have anybody to talk to about it and I didn’t know what to do,” Pink said in a video shared to Instagram and Twitter. “I would feel like I was having strokes, like, stroke symptoms, it was terrifying.” She shared this part of her story in partnership with the nonprofit Child Mind Institute, whose new campaign seeks to prevent young people from remaining silent about their mental health. Panic attacks are the hallmark sign of panic disorder, which is a type of anxiety disorder, per the U.S. National Library of Medicine. These attacks are characterized by sudden, unexpected feelings of intense fear and anxiety, as well as distressing physical symptoms. The signs of a panic attack can include an irregular or racing heartbeat, shaking, sweating, breathing difficulties, chills, chest pain, nausea, and feeling like you have lost control. In severe attacks, a person may even feel like they are having a heart attack or dying.Instagram contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.For Pink (born Alecia Beth Moore), panic attacks would sometimes prompt her to visit the emergency room, but her concerns were often brushed off. “I had a number of EKGs [electrocardiograms] that always led back to ‘You’re fine, you’re fine, there’s nothing wrong, you’re imagining it all, it’s all in your head,’” she recalled. No one deserves to live with the symptoms of panic disorder—and professional treatment is necessary when the condition starts to overwhelm a person’s daily life. Some go-to treatment options include antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, or various forms of talk therapy, where you can discuss your feelings with a licensed mental health professional in order to better understand your anxiety triggers and how to manage them. For Pink, therapy was a game-changer. “I started learning all these steps on how to take care of myself, I’d never been taught how to take care of myself,” Pink said.

Over 63% of Family Members of COVID-19 ICU Patients Experienced ‘Significant Symptoms of PTSD,’ Study Finds

Over 63% of Family Members of COVID-19 ICU Patients Experienced ‘Significant Symptoms of PTSD,’ Study Finds

Relatives of COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) may be more likely to experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, according to a new study. Certain populations—including females, Hispanic people, and individuals who have taken medication for a psychiatric condition—had a higher chance of suffering from the symptoms, the researchers behind the new report found. The findings raise questions about how PTSD in family members of critically ill patients can be prevented and what strategies can be put in place to provide support for them, especially when they aren’t able to see their loved ones due to COVID-19 visitation restrictions.The study was led by Timothy Amass, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and published last week in JAMA Internal Medicine. Dr. Amass and his team analyzed data from 330 family members of COVID-19 patients who spent time in the ICU between February 1 and July 31, 2020. They determined that relatives were more likely to experience PTSD symptoms three to four months after their family member was admitted to the ICU, using a tool called the Impact of Events Scale 6 (IES-6), a scoring mechanism clinicians use to evaluate how severe a patient’s PTSD symptoms are.The average IES-6 score of female participants was 2.6 points higher than that of male participants, and the average score of Hispanic participants was 2.7 points higher than that of non-Hispanic participants. Additionally, the researchers found that the average score for participants who had used psychiatric medication during the year prior to their relative’s ICU admission was 3 points higher than the average score of participants who hadn’t used psychiatric medication.This isn’t the first research to link having a relative in the ICU with mental health conditions: “The prevalence of symptoms of PTSD, depression, and anxiety in this population vary widely but were approximately 15% to 30% before the COVID-19 pandemic,” the study authors wrote. However, 63.6% of participants analyzed for the new study scored 10 or higher on the IES-6 scale in the months after their relative was admitted to the ICU—indicating to the researchers that they were experiencing “significant symptoms of PTSD.” The researchers also noted that 31% of participants experienced “significant symptoms of anxiety or depression” during this time.Follow-up surveys found that 48.4% of participants were still suffering from PTSD six months after their relative had been admitted to the ICU and 25.2% were still suffering from anxiety and depression.The elevated rates of anxiety, depression, and PTSD in family members could be related to the fact that COVID-19 can cause a patient’s health to deteriorate rapidly. People with a moderately to severely weakened immune system are at increased risk of severe illness and death caused by COVID-19, and potential risks of a severe case include respiratory failure, lung damage, long COVID, or even death. The study authors said that 41.3% of patients included in the survey passed away in the hospital, with many family members unable to see them due to the risks of contracting COVID-19 themselves. These visitation restrictions could also be related to the symptoms experienced by study participants, the authors wrote; study participants with higher rates of PTSD were more likely to describe feelings of concern and distrust, mainly because they couldn’t see the ICU patient’s condition for themselves.“These data, combined with recent qualitative analyses highlighting the centrality of visitation restriction and fractured communication with health care practitioners as primary drivers of family stress symptoms, support the hypothesis that visitation restriction plays a role in increasing stress-related disorders in family members who could not be present at the bedside of their critically ill family member,” the study said. The authors encouraged health care practitioners to allow for more “participation and control” at the bedside with the hope of improving mental health outcomes for family members of ill patients.Related:

Celine Dion Postpones Tour Due to Muscle Spasms

Celine Dion Postpones Tour Due to Muscle Spasms

Celine Dion, 54, has postponed the European leg of her “Courage World Tour” because of a health condition, a press release said. “Celine…recently has been treated for severe and persistent muscle spasms which are preventing her from performing, and her recovery is taking longer than she hoped,” the statement said. “Her medical team continues to evaluate and treat the condition.”Dion also shared a message about the postponed shows with her five million Instagram followers: “I’m getting treatment from my doctors, taking medication, but I’m still experiencing some spasm, and it’s taking longer for me to recover than I had hoped.”Instagram contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.Dion’s team hasn’t shared much information about the underlying cause of her muscle spasms, which have caused multiple delays and postponements in her tour schedule within the last year. In October 2021, she delayed her Las Vegas residency due to “unforeseen medical symptoms.” And in January she had to cancel shows in North America because of the condition.In her latest Instagram post, Dion said that while she is recovering, she isn’t yet completely healed. “The good news is that I’m doing a little bit better, but it’s going very slow. And it’s frustrating for me,” she explained. “I need to be in top shape when I’m onstage. I honestly can’t wait. But I’m just not there yet.”Muscle spasms, also called muscle cramps, are an uncomfortable, tightening contraction of the muscles according to Cleveland Clinic. These spasms, often unpredictable and involuntary, most commonly occur in the abdomen, thighs, calves, feet, hands, and arms; they can last from a few seconds to 15 minutes or longer. Dehydration, nerve discharges, restricted blood flow, exercising in high temperatures, or muscular fatigue can cause muscle spasms, and the best way to relieve them is by stretching out the affected area or massaging it with a foam roller or your hands. You can also try walking around, applying a heat pad or ice pack, or taking painkillers (such as ibuprofen and acetaminophen). Some experts also suggest a daily vitamin B12 supplement may help, per Cleveland Clinic.Dion’s postponed tour dates have been rescheduled for 2023; the first shows will be held from February to April, and the later leg will last from August to October. A full list of the new world tour dates are available on her website. In her Instagram post, Dion expressed appreciation for her fans and the messages of support she’s been receiving, saying, “All I can say is that I’m doing my best to get back to the level that I need to be so that I can give one hundred percent at my shows.”Related:

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com