Sarah Jacoby

COVID-19 Vaccines Won’t Affect Your Sexual Performance, but COVID-19 Might

COVID-19 Vaccines Won’t Affect Your Sexual Performance, but COVID-19 Might

It’s been nearly a year since the first COVID-19 vaccines received emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but some people still have questions about the shots—especially about the possibility of sexual side effects—that are keeping them from getting vaccinated. Nicki Minaj, for instance, wrote on Twitter this week that she’ll get vaccinated only “once I feel I’ve done enough research. I’m working on that now.” Minaj then followed that up with a bizarre and questionable story about her cousin in Trinidad who “won’t get the vaccine cuz his friend got it & became impotent,” she wrote. “His testicles became swollen. His friend was weeks away from getting married, now the girl called off the wedding.” But the truth is that there’s no research to suggest that the COVID-19 vaccines can alter sexual performance—including sperm production, erectile dysfunction, or swollen testicles. “There is no evidence that vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause male fertility problems,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The most common side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines are slightly different depending on which vaccine you get, but they generally include pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, fever, and chills. Those side effects are temporary (lasting just a day or two, typically) and tend to be more severe after the second dose than the first. Some people develop side effects that are much more noticeable, even to a degree that can actually make it difficult for them to do their usual tasks during the day—including, possibly, having sex. But, again, those side effects are temporary and do not specifically include sexual performance issues or swollen testicles (technical term: orchitis).On the other hand, there is some preliminary evidence that the coronavirus can cause issues with sexual performance—especially for those with penises. For instance, a small study published in the journal Andrology looked at survey data for 100 sexually active men (25 had COVID-19 at some point, 75 did not). Their results showed that men who had COVID-19 were much more likely to report having erectile dysfunction than those who hadn’t had the virus. Another recent study, this one published in the World Journal of Men’s Health, actually looked at tissue samples from four people (two of whom had COVID-19 previously) undergoing surgery to treat severe erectile dysfunction. The researchers detected viral particles in tissue from both of the participants even though they had long gotten over their infections. They also found evidence of issues with endothelial cells (which line blood vessels) in those who’d had COVID-19, which suggests that the virus can actually affect sexual function by damaging those cells.That’s why the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) recommends COVID-19 vaccines to men who are eligible to receive them. “COVID-19 vaccines should be offered to men desiring fertility, similar to men not desiring fertility, when they meet criteria for vaccination,” the ASRM said in a statement. (The ASRM does note that some people develop a fever after vaccination, and a fever can temporarily reduce sperm production, “but that would be similar to or less than if the individual experienced fever from developing COVID-19 or for other reasons.” A recent study in JAMA confirmed that it’s unlikely you’ll experience a significant drop in sperm production after the vaccine.)Of course, there are plenty of other possible conditions that might cause someone to develop sexual performance issues—whether or not they’ve had COVID-19 or the vaccines. In fact, some of the most common causes of orchitis are actually other infections, including mumps and sexually transmitted infections like gonorrhea or chlamydia, the Mayo Clinic explains. Orchitis can also be a result of epididymitis, a bacterial infection in the epididymis. Getting your regular vaccines (including the childhood MMR vaccine, which protects against mumps) and sticking with safer sex practices, such as getting tested for STIs, can reduce the risk for conditions that cause orchitis.It’s perfectly normal to have questions about the COVID-19 vaccines and to be nervous if you hear that someone you know may have had a less than stellar experience with them. But it’s important to talk through those questions and concerns—and weigh any potential risks and benefits of the vaccine against those of getting a COVID-19 infection while unvaccinated—with a qualified and trusted expert, like your primary care doctor, rather than to speculate wildly on social media. Related:

Here’s Why There’s So Much Controversy Over COVID-19 Booster Shots Right Now

Here’s Why There’s So Much Controversy Over COVID-19 Booster Shots Right Now

Last month, the White House and some public health experts released a plan to offer third COVID-19 vaccine doses (booster shots) to the general public amid the spread of the highly transmissible delta variant. But other experts are skeptical that additional doses would provide any significant benefit for those who are already fully vaccinated—and say that any surplus doses would be better used in areas of the world that haven’t had enough access to the vaccines.The White House first announced its booster shot plan less than a week after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized a third dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines for people who are immunocompromised. And the FDA is set to meet to discuss the potential use of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for boosters in the general population later this week. Moderna has also asked the FDA to review its data for a third dose of its mRNA vaccine.But some experts say there’s not enough data to start administering additional doses to the entire general public just yet. And while the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) appeared to be on board with the White House’s announcement, Politico reports that tensions are now rising between the CDC, FDA, and White House over access to crucial data and a potential change in the booster rollout that would prioritize frontline health care workers and nursing home residents. There is evidence to suggest that getting another vaccine dose could be helpful for a few specific populations, including immunocompromised people, the elderly, people who live in nursing homes, and those who got the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine, Celine Gounder, M.D., clinical assistant professor of medicine and infectious diseases at New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine, said on Twitter this week. “NOT for the general public at this time.”Ashish K. Jha, M.D., MPH, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, agreed in an interview on CNN that additional doses may make sense for “high-risk people,” including those who are elderly and immunocompromised. “The big question right now is, ‘What about young, healthy people?’ There, I think the science is far less settled,” Dr. Jha said. “But for high-risk people, absolutely, I think boosters are going to be necessary.”The disagreements reached a peak this week when a group of respected vaccine and public health experts, including two people who recently left the FDA (reportedly due in part to frustrations over the White House’s booster plan), published an editorial in The Lancet arguing against the use of booster shots for the general public right now. “Although the efficacy of most vaccines against symptomatic disease is somewhat less for the delta variant than for the alpha variant, there is still high vaccine efficacy against both symptomatic and severe disease due to the delta variant,” the authors write. “Current evidence does not, therefore, appear to show a need for boosting in the general population, in which efficacy against severe disease remains high.” It’s very possible that, someday, we will need additional vaccine doses due to waning protection or the emergence of a new variant that significantly evades the vaccines, the authors say. But they argue that we aren’t at that point yet, and they say that focusing on getting as many people as possible fully vaccinated—with the initial set of doses—around the world will do more good than offering boosters to the already vaccinated.Indeed, there are real ethical concerns about giving people in wealthier countries like the U.S. and U.K. access to a third dose (and a fourth dose to those in Israel) that might be helpful when so much of the world hasn’t had access to the definitely beneficial first doses. After the White House announcement, the WHO called for wealthier countries to halt the administration of additional COVID-19 vaccine doses through the end of the year so that other countries could get more of their populations vaccinated. Doing so will obviously help protect people in those countries, but it could have beneficial effects for the entire globe by reducing the chances that another dangerous coronavirus variant will emerge.The FDA will undoubtedly be weighing all of these issues when it meets to discuss the possibility of boosters for the general population later this month. Whatever the FDA decides, remember that vaccines are just one of many public health tools we can use to contain the pandemic in the coming months. As President Biden made clear in his newly announced COVID-19 Action Plan, vaccines will play a major role in our continued response to COVID-19, but they work best when used alongside frequent testing, masks, and other measures to keep people safe.Related:

Dole Recalled Fresh Curly Leaf Parsley in Five States Due to Possible E. Coli Contamination

Dole Recalled Fresh Curly Leaf Parsley in Five States Due to Possible E. Coli Contamination

Dole Fresh Vegetables, Inc. just announced a voluntary parsley recall that affects products in five states due to possible contamination with E. coli.The parsley recall only includes bunches of Dole Curly Leaf Parsley (not the flat-leaf variety) with harvest dates between August 18 and August 19, 2021. Additionally, the recall only affects greens that were sold in five states: Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Missouri, according to an alert posted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website. Dole learned of the issue after routine testing in Michigan detected the presence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) bacteria in a sample of the curly leaf parsley. E. coli is a type of bacteria that infects people when they eat contaminated food. While many types of E. coli are harmless to humans, some types (including STEC) can cause illness, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explain. People who’ve been infected by STEC may develop symptoms such as diarrhea (possibly bloody), stomach cramps, vomiting, and fever (usually below 101 degrees Fahrenheit). Those symptoms typically show up between three and four days after someone eats contaminated food. People of any age can become infected by E. coli, but very young children and elderly adults are more likely to have severe symptoms, the CDC says. People in those vulnerable age groups are also more likely to develop hemolytic uremic syndrome, a potentially life-threatening complication of an E. coli infection. So far, there haven’t been any illnesses reported in relation to this parsley recall.If you think you may have some of the recalled parsley, check the PLU and UPC numbers on the twist tie. Bunches of parsley that are included in the recall came with twist ties showing a PLU number of 4899 and UPC code of 0 3383 80330 0. (See the FDA site here for more information on finding those numbers.) If your parsley is included in the recall, Dole recommends discarding it. Related:

What You Need to Know About Biden's New Sweeping Vaccine Mandate

What You Need to Know About Biden's New Sweeping Vaccine Mandate

Last night, President Biden announced a new COVID-19 vaccine mandate as part of a major plan to contain the pandemic. “Even as the delta variant—COVID-19—has been hitting this country hard, we have the tools to combat the virus, if we can come together as a country and use those tools,” Biden said in a speech on September 9, 2021. “If we raise our vaccination rate, protect ourselves and others with masking and expanded testing, and identify people who are infected, we can and we will turn the tide on COVID-19.”He went on to announce the COVID-19 Action Plan, a six-point strategy to get ahold of the pandemic that includes getting more people vaccinated, adding even more protection for those who are already vaccinated, making sure schools can stay open safely, implementing other precautions (including making free COVID-19 tests widely available and requiring masks in certain situations), improving care for people with COVID-19, and protecting the country’s economic recovery.As you might imagine, that includes many intertwined strategies. But the one that’s already gotten the most attention is a vaccine mandate that will apply to all private companies with 100 or more employees. The plan also includes a requirement that those employers give people paid time off in order to get the vaccines.“I’m announcing that the Department of Labor is developing an emergency rule to require all employers with 100 or more employees, that together employ over 80 million workers, to ensure their workforces are fully vaccinated or show a negative test at least once a week,” Biden said. “We’re going to protect vaccinated workers from unvaccinated coworkers. We’re going to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by increasing the share of the workforce that is vaccinated in businesses all across America.” Legal experts previously told SELF that a vaccine mandate like this is unlikely to be a violation of health privacy regulations. And companies may be more comfortable implementing COVID-19 vaccine requirements now that the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine has full approval from the Food and Drug Administration.The vaccine mandate—and the whole sweeping plan—is a bold move that public health experts have been eagerly waiting for. “Biden’s 6-point Delta plan has much of what I’ve been wanting to see,” Celine Gounder, M.D., clinical assistant professor of medicine and infectious diseases at New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine, wrote on Twitter. “Making use of the ENTIRE toolbox against COVID, including but not limited to vaccines.” “I’m pretty thrilled with @potus announcement today,” Ashish K. Jha, M.D., MPH, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, said on Twitter. “COVID is killing 1500 Americans. Every. Day. We have the tools to defeat COVID.”“This is the testing plan that we’ve been waiting for. Defense Production Act to ramp up rapid antigen test. Major retailers to sell COVID tests at cost. Expanding free testing at pharmacies,” Thomas Tsai, M.D., MPH, assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, wrote on Twitter. “With the new @WhiteHouse Path Out of the Pandemic Plan, we can refocus on #FlattenTheCurve through vaccinations, testing, ventilation, and masking. We did this in 2020 to protect the elderly in nursing homes. We can do this now to protect our children in schools,” he continued.That said, there are a few places where they felt the plan could have gone further, and some expressed some reservations about whether there is really enough data to warrant third COVID-19 vaccine shots for the general public. But overall, the plan contains a combination of the public health measures we already know can help push us out of the pandemic (including vaccines, testing, masks, and more) if they’re used effectively on a large scale.Related:

Meghan King Shared a Story About Her Son’s ‘Hidden Disability’ to Spread Awareness and Empathy

Meghan King Shared a Story About Her Son’s ‘Hidden Disability’ to Spread Awareness and Empathy

Meghan King shared a poignant story about her three-year-old son Hart’s experience with cerebral palsy in an effort to spread awareness and inspire empathy for those with invisible illnesses. The Real Housewives of Orange County alum and mom of three shared the story with her followers on Instagram. “The other day it was raining and I had to park my car outside,” King recalled in the post. “Aspen said, ‘Okay guys, let’s run as fast as we can to go inside!’ Hayes said, ‘Yes! Let’s go!’ And Hart started crying. He said he can’t run as fast as them…and he can’t. Not because of his genetics but because of his cerebral palsy.” Strangers might think Hart “looks and acts ‘normal’ (we say ‘typical’) but he’s not. He has a hidden disability that affects every part of his life—and mine,” King wrote. “And now he knows this and so do his siblings. It breaks my heart into a million pieces.” Cerebral palsy is not one disorder but actually a group of neurological conditions that cause issues with muscle coordination, exaggerated reflexes, stiff muscles, and changes in gait, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) explains. The symptoms typically begin to appear during infancy or early childhood, but the exact symptoms someone experiences can vary greatly from person to person, the Mayo Clinic says. Some might experience delays in speech development or trouble speaking while others might develop seizures, difficulty hearing, or changes in vision.Although there’s no cure for cerebral palsy, there are treatments that can significantly improve the symptoms, NINDS says. The right treatment plan depends on each person’s specific symptoms, the Mayo Clinic says, and those needs can change over time. Treatment can include medications (such as muscle relaxants or muscle injections), supportive therapies (like speech therapy or physical therapy), and surgery to improve mobility and reduce pain.King first shared Hart’s diagnosis publicly in a blog post about a year ago. “Hart will live a full, independent life. He will face challenges his siblings won’t and alternatively, they will face challenges he won’t but we just don’t know what those are yet,” she wrote at the time. “A diagnosis isn’t limiting, people are.”And in her Instagram post, King clarified that her post “isn’t for sympathy—no special needs parent wants sympathy—it’s for awareness,” she wrote. “Sometimes we don’t know our neighbor’s full story, so let’s dig deeper for an extra ounce of empathy.”Related:

Amy Klobuchar Reveals She Underwent Treatment for Breast Cancer Earlier This Year

Amy Klobuchar Reveals She Underwent Treatment for Breast Cancer Earlier This Year

Senator Amy Klobuchar was diagnosed and treated for early-stage breast cancer earlier this year, the former presidential candidate announced in a post on Medium. Now she’s sharing an update on her health and urging others to take the need for routine medical screenings seriously—even during the pandemic.Back in February, Klobuchar’s routine mammogram detected calcifications (calcium deposits) in her breast tissue. “After this was discovered, I had a biopsy at Piper Breast Center in Minneapolis, and then learned that I had Stage 1A breast cancer,” she wrote. After a series of other tests, Klobuchar, 61, underwent a “lumpectomy on the right breast which involved the removal of the cancer. In May, I completed a course of radiation treatment, and after additional follow-up visits, it was determined in August that the treatment went well,” she wrote.“Of course this has been scary at times, since cancer is the word all of us fear,” she continued, “but at this point my doctors believe that my chances of developing cancer again are no greater than the average person.”Calcifications are a common finding in mammograms and, although they are usually not a sign of cancer, they can sometimes appear in patterns that suggest cancer may be present, the Mayo Clinic explains. If there is a concern that calcium deposits may be an early sign of cancer, the patient may have to undergo another mammogram and biopsy to figure out what’s going on.Klobuchar’s diagnosis of stage IA cancer indicates that her cancer was still small and likely had not spread to the lymph nodes, the American Cancer Society (ACS) explains. Surgery is typically the go-to treatment strategy for small tumors in stage I breast cancer, including the lumpectomy (also called breast-conserving surgery) that Klobuchar received. In some cases, patients also undergo radiation treatment after surgery to reduce the chances that the cancer will return, the ACS says.“I also want to call attention to the fact that many people have been delaying physicals and routine examinations because of the pandemic,” Klobuchar wrote. “I know that because I delayed mine.” The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women begin to get preventive breast cancer screening every two years at age 50 if they have an average risk for the disease. For people between the ages of 40 and 49, the USPSTF recommends they speak with their doctor about their risk factors for breast cancer (such as a family history of breast cancer) and discuss whether or not starting screening early makes sense for them.But due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many people understandably haven’t been as diligent about going to those regular appointments as usual. Although it’s easy to put those routine check-ups at the bottom of a to-do list, Klobuchar hopes her experience “is a reminder for everyone of the value of routine health checkups, exams, and follow-through,” she wrote. “I am so fortunate to have caught the cancer at an early enough stage and to not need chemotherapy or other extensive treatments, which unfortunately is not the case for so many others.”Klobuchar ended her post with a message of gratitude: “Like often happens with anyone dealing with illness, this experience gave me time to reflect on my own life and those I love. It also gave me renewed purpose to my work,” she said. “I have immense gratitude for my family, friends, colleagues, and the people of Minnesota, and I know that each day is a gift. Thank you for your support.”Related:

Peloton Just Released Its Own Massive Activewear Collection

Peloton Just Released Its Own Massive Activewear Collection

With the long-awaited launch of its own activewear line, Peloton is sure to become even more ubiquitous. As of today, the company is launching Peloton Apparel, the first collection to be made up almost entirely of its own private label.The company has previously partnered with other companies to produce Peloton-branded pieces, sold some limited basics in-store, and dropped seasonal styles online since 2014. But the launch of Peloton Apparel marks the first time it’s been able to really dig into what its community members—and all-star trainers—want in workout clothing on a large scale, Jill Foley, VP of apparel at the company, tells SELF.The collection is based around four different types of fabric and includes pieces aimed at pure performance as well as low-impact activity and even some work-appropriate styles. Those fabrics include Cadent, which is a stretchy, soft performance jersey with moderate compression; Move Mission, a mid- to high-compression buttery quick-drying fabric meant for high-performance activities; Essential, which Peloton refers to as a “second skin” fabric with light compression; and Lite Lines, which is a moisture-wicking lightweight jersey knit.Courtesy of PelotonThis massive Peloton Apparel drop includes men’s and women’s items such as sports bras, leggings, bike shorts, running shorts, joggers, long sleeve tops, short sleeves tops, tank tops, sweatshirts, hoodies, and (somehow) more. Many styles are available in sizes XS to 3X, but some are only available up to XL or XXL.When thinking about the collection, the brand only ever wanted to “enhance the member experience” of a Peloton workout, Foley says. Wearing a sports bra that pinches uncomfortably or a shirt that leaves you chafing and drowning in sweat can ruin a run, and that can throw off an entire day. So, when testing out pieces, Foley says her team relied on real-time feedback from Peloton trainers as well as Peloton users. Courtesy of PelotonThat emphasis on how the clothes make you feel led the designers to include some uplifting details, like the words “Together we go far,” a little affirmation familiar to any Peloton fan, hidden under the collar of a jacket or written in small letters along the side of a pair of bike shorts. Ultimately, Foley says, the collection is a way for Peloton community members to feel like even more of a community, whether that means showing off with a bold logo or wearing the same t-shirt they saw on their favorite trainer, and to take those good endorphin-fueled feelings off the mat, treadmill, or bike and into the rest of their day.Related:

Whoop Just Launched Workout Clothes Designed to Hold Your Fitness Tracker

Whoop Just Launched Workout Clothes Designed to Hold Your Fitness Tracker

Whoop, a fitness-and-health tracker with a dedicated following of athletes and fitness enthusiasts, just released its latest low-profile device: the Whoop 4.0. And while you can wear it the old-fashioned way on your wrist, Whoop is also introducing Whoop Body, a clothing collection including high-tech activewear pieces designed to hold the tracker for you.Trackers from Whoop have gained a following due to the brand’s focus on providing detailed data to help you recover as well as train hard. In fact, personal trainers told SELF previously that they particularly appreciate that Whoop trackers and the companion app provide easy-to-digest sleep, recovery, and strain scores (using measures like heart rate variability, sleep hours, and resting heart rate) to guide their day’s activity and rest levels. The brand’s latest tracker, the Whoop 4.0, builds on that formula with even more features, a slimmer design, and an upgraded on-the-go battery pack. Those new features include skin-temperature sensing, a pulse oximeter, and haptic wake-up alarms that will ease you out of sleep with gentle vibrations based on your sleep-cycle data. There are also two new types of wristbands designed to work with the Whoop tracker: The SuperKnit is designed to be both comfortable and durable while the upcoming HydroKnit is made to dry quickly after use in water sports.But perhaps the most innovative part of the new launch isn’t what the tracker can do, but how you can wear it. Alongside the Whoop 4.0., the company is releasing Whoop Body, which includes a training collection of performance-focused activewear (sports bras, leggings, compression tops, etc.) and an everyday intimates collection (bralettes, boxers, etc.) featuring what the brand calls Any-Wear Technology. This technology allows users to wear their tracker in a pocket on their clothing and continue tracking—no wristband required. Whoop Body will be available in women’s sizes XS to XL and men’s sizes S to XXL, and the brand does plan to expand the lines’ sizes, styles, and materials in the future. Also, note that Whoop Body is only compatible with the new Whoop 4.0, so those with previous versions of the tracker will need to upgrade. The Whoop 4.0 comes free with a membership to the Whoop app. Whoop membership packages are available in 6-, 12-, and 18-month packages ($180, $288, and $324, respectively). Those who already have a Whoop membership and have at least six months left on it can get a new Whoop 4.0 for free. The company is also introducing a new membership option, Whoop Pro, for an additional $12 per month, which comes with benefits like free shipping and a free item (such as a new band or arm sleeve) every quarter.Related:

Stanley Tucci Reveals He Was Treated for Cancer 3 Years Ago

Stanley Tucci Reveals He Was Treated for Cancer 3 Years Ago

Actor Stanley Tucci revealed that he quietly underwent treatment for cancer three years ago. Tucci also spoke candidly about how losing his first wife to cancer shaped his outlook on his own diagnosis. About three years ago, doctors found a tumor at the base of Tucci’s tongue, he explained in a new interview with Vera, the Virgin Atlantic in-flight magazine. “It was too big to operate, so they had to do high-dose radiation and chemo,” Tucci said. He also had to use a feeding tube for six months.“I’d vowed I’d never do anything like that because my first wife died of cancer, and to watch her go through those treatments for years was horrible,” he continued. Tucci’s late wife, Kate, died in 2009 due to breast cancer. Tucci didn’t share too many other details about his diagnosis or treatment process. Treatment for oral cancer (which includes cancer in the mouth and throat areas) can involve surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or the use of other targeted drugs, the Mayo Clinic explains. But the exact treatment plan depends on the location of the tumor, how large it is, and how far the cancer has spread. Surgical removal for oral cancer, in particular, can be challenging because if the tumor is large enough, removing it may require also removing a portion of the tongue or jawbone, the Mayo Clinic says. In that case, a patient might also require reconstructive surgery to restore the mouth. Typically, surgery is used in the case of early-stage cancers that are small and haven’t spread, the American Cancer Society explains. Radiation, often used in combination with chemotherapy, might be used after surgery or in a case where surgery isn’t an option, as in Tucci’s case.Having lost his wife to cancer previously and seen the toll that these treatments can take, Tucci was concerned about the effects his cancer journey might have on his family, including his kids. “The kids were great, but it was hard for them,” he said in the interview. “I could barely make it to the twins’ high school graduation.”Thankfully, Tucci said that his treatment was successful and the cancer is not likely to return. Cancer “makes you more afraid and less afraid at the same time,” Tucci said. “I feel much older than I did before I was sick. But you still want to get ahead and get things done.”Related:

Chrissy Teigen Celebrates 50 Days of Sobriety With a Sweet Instagram Video

Chrissy Teigen Celebrates 50 Days of Sobriety With a Sweet Instagram Video

Chrissy Teigen is celebrating a major sobriety milestone, and she marked the occasion by sharing a sweet video with her kids and a very honest caption.“today is my 50 day sobriety streak! it should be nearly a year but I had a few (wine) hiccups in the road,” Teigen wrote alongside a video of herself on Instagram. The video shows Teigen attempting to work out on a yoga mat being delightfully interrupted by her kids, Luna and Miles.“this is my longest streak yet!,” she continued. “I still dunno if I’ll never drink again but I do know it no longer serves me in ANY way. I don’t get more fun, I don’t dance, I don’t get relaxed. I get sick, fall asleep and wake up sick, having missed what was probably a fun night. I had my fun with it and appreciate anyone that can enjoy it responsibly!!!!”Teigen has spoken before about her changing relationship with alcohol. In a 2017 interview, she noted how easily drinking can get out of hand at public events as well as casual drinking on a plane or with friends at “boozy brunches,” for instance. Teigen also mentioned that she has a family history of alcohol abuse and that a recent wellness retreat had opened her up to the idea of cutting back. “I used to think it was kind of nutty to have to go totally sober, but now I get it. I don’t want to be that person,” she said at the time. “I have to fix myself.”In fact, she’s one of many people who has taken a step back on drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic. Recent research shows that some people, particularly women, have turned more to alcohol to help cope with their feelings during the pandemic. But for others, the increased stress and isolation during the pandemic made them more aware of the potentially problematic ways that they used alcohol and how it could hinder their overall health and wellbeing. For Teigen, her change in drinking habits seems to have kickstarted some other healthful life changes. “this is also my third day this week working out which is unheard of for me,” she wrote in the post. “and my bears are notttt making it easy.”Related:

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