Sarah Jacoby

How to Feel Hopeful, Even When It’s Really, Really Hard

How to Feel Hopeful, Even When It’s Really, Really Hard

And for those with mental illnesses, such as depression or anxiety, cultivating hope and resilience can be key to managing their symptoms, Dr. Tedeschi says. In depression, for instance, a persistent feeling of hopelessness is often a defining symptom. In the case of anxiety, fear is one of the driving factors. “In both cases, they’re drawing the conclusion that things are out of their control and things aren’t going to work,” Dr. Tedeschi says. Figuring out a way to become more hopeful, even—or especially—when life is difficult, is usually a necessary component of treatment.Being hopeful can help you build resilience.Putting in the work to be hopeful has other psychological benefits too. In particular, hope helps build resilience, which “is the ability to either recover quickly from events that are challenging or traumatic or a crisis or to be relatively unaffected by these events,” Dr. Tedeschi explains.But resilience isn’t just being able to withstand a difficult situation. “It has to do with living a fuller life,” Lillian Comas-Diaz, PhD, a psychologist specializing in trauma recovery and multicultural issues, tells SELF. “Resilience is a way of coping with adversity and being able to get some knowledge from that adversity,” which might help you improve your coping mechanisms for the future.From there, it’s easy to see how hope, optimism, and a generally more positive outlook might develop with resilience. It works like a feedback loop, Dr. Tedeschi says: “If you have success in managing these situations, you become more optimistic about how you’re going to do in the future,” he explains. And as you develop some optimism and hope, that might help you persist and manage in the face of the difficulties we all inevitably face.How to be hopeful when things feel hopelessHere are a few tips from our experts.If it’s really hard to feel hopeful right now, start by just acknowledging that.Some people are just naturally optimistic, even in a situation like this. But, generally, resilience is something that’s learned—first through our experiences in childhood, potentially, and then later as we go through the inevitable challenges of life, Dr. Tedeschi says. So for those of us who maybe feel a little silly trying to look for a silver lining in, you know, These Unprecedented Times, trying to be hopeful just doesn’t feel genuine. And if it’s not authentic, it isn’t very helpful.If you’re someone who finds it difficult or even feels silly trying to be optimistic right now, know that hope doesn’t necessarily mean thinking that everything will always be amazing. Being hopeful doesn’t have to be about looking for the bright side or deluding ourselves into thinking everything will be just fine, Dr. Comas-Diaz says. Hope is really just a (realistic) expectation that something good will happen—and that you have some control over it.For some people, it might be difficult to be hopeful because they don’t have a source of hope they can immediately point to, Dr. Comas-Diaz says. In those cases, she will ask her patients to do an inventory, asking what sources of hope their friends, family, or larger culture draw upon and if the patient can “borrow” from that source as well. Think about, say, your mom or a close friend—what brings them hope? Can you share that with them or get some hope vicariously through them? Or is there a particular cause you’re really passionate about that you can draw some sense of optimism from?

Tastykake Products Recalled in Multiple States Because They May Contain Metal Fragments

Tastykake Products Recalled in Multiple States Because They May Contain Metal Fragments

A Tastykake recall is in effect and it includes certain packs of cupcakes and Krimpets in multiple states. The delicious baked goods may contain fragments of metal mesh, according to a notice posted on the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website.Flowers Foods, Inc., first initiated the Tastykake recall on October 31, 2021, and has since updated it to include more products. Originally, the company warned consumers not to eat multipacks of three varieties of Tastykake cupcakes sold in several states, according to the FDA release. Specifically, the recalled treats were sold to consumers in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington D.C., and West Virginia.Now the recall includes multipacks (which may contain two to six cupcakes, or a box of six packages of two cakes) of Tastycake chocolate, creme-filled chocolate, and buttercream iced creme-filled chocolate cupcakes as well as certain lots of jelly Krimpets, creme-filled Krimpets, and butterscotch Krimpets in those states. All of the recalled products have “enjoy by” dates between November 20 and December 25, 2021. (For specific UPC information, lot codes, and photos of the recalled products, check the FDA site here.)The company is voluntarily recalling these Tastykake products due to the possible presence of “tiny fragments of metal mesh wire,” according to the FDA release. A vendor notified the company that an ingredient may contain the metal pieces. To date, there have been no injuries associated with the recall, however. Anyone who has purchased the recalled cupcakes and Krimpets should not eat them, the company says, and should instead dispose of them or return the products to where they were purchased for a refund.Related:

Cervical Cancer Rates Are Falling Dramatically Thanks to HPV Vaccines

Cervical Cancer Rates Are Falling Dramatically Thanks to HPV Vaccines

The rate of cervical cancer cases among women in the U.K. fell dramatically after the introduction of the first generation of HPV vaccines, according to estimates from a new study. The vaccine protects against multiple strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted infection that can lead to cervical cancer in some cases.For the study, published this week in The Lancet and funded by charity Cancer Research UK, researchers looked at three groups of women who got the shots in 2008 in England when the country’s national HPV vaccination program began. Those groups included people who were vaccinated at age 12 to 13, at age 14 to 16, and at age 16 to 18, respectively. The researchers compared data from the vaccinated groups to data from older people who were not eligible to get the vaccine.Through data modeling using information from a national cancer registry, the authors estimated that the vaccine prevented about 448 cases of cervical cancer between January 1, 2006, and June 30, 2021. They also estimated that the vaccine prevented around 17,325 cases of cervical precancerous cells, which can develop into cancer if left untreated. That amounts to an 87% reduction in cervical cancer cases among the youngest group during this time period. The groups that received the vaccine when they were older saw reduced but still significant reductions in their cervical cancer rates.Note that in this study the researchers specifically looked at people who had received the vaccine Cervarix, which has since been voluntarily removed from the market. People in the U.S. may be more familiar with the similar Gardasil HPV vaccine, which was first introduced in the States in 2006 and in the U.K. in 2012.Today in the U.S., the National Cancer Institute estimates there will be more than 14,000 new cases of cervical cancer this year, a rate that has declined significantly since the 1990s. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) currently recommends that kids get the HPV vaccine around age 11 or 12. But you can start it as early as age 9 and it’s recommended for everyone through age 26. Those who are older than 26 and haven’t gotten an HPV vaccine can still get one, but the CDC recommends they chat about the decision with a health care provider first. (By 26, the CDC says, most people have already been exposed to the virus, so there’s less of a benefit to getting vaccinated at that point.)The original versions of the HPV vaccine, including Cervarix and Gardasil, only protected against a few strains of the virus. More recent versions of Gardasil protect against more strains. And it’s not just about cervical cancer—HPV infections can also cause throat and anal cancers, which have been on the rise over the past decade. So, getting your kids vaccinated against HPV helps protect them from both the virus and several HPV-related cancers. Related:

Khloé Kardashian Shared an Update After Testing Positive for COVID-19 Again

Khloé Kardashian Shared an Update After Testing Positive for COVID-19 Again

Khloé Kardashian tested positive for COVID-19—for the second time. And, this time around, her young daughter True also got the virus. A few days after testing positive, Kardashian shared an update with her followers on Instagram. “I am so over this!! #CovidSucks,” the Good American founder wrote in the Instagram caption. The relatable sentiment appeared alongside a photo of Kardashian resting her chin in her hand while sitting atop a giant heart and wearing knee-high black boots.On October 29, 2021, Kardashian revealed on Twitter that she and True both tested positive recently. She also shared that she is vaccinated, making her COVID-19 case a rare breakthrough infection. And while the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just recommended the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages five and up, three-year-old True is still too young to be vaccinated. “Hi guys I wanted to let you know True and I tested positive for Covid. I’ve had to cancel several commitments and I’m sorry I won’t be able to make those happen,” Kardashian tweeted over the past weekend. “Luckily I have been vaccinated so all will be ok. We will be over here in quarantine and following current guidelines.”During her previous bout of COVID-19, which was revealed in an episode of Keeping Up With the Kardashians, she experienced a burning cough, “vomiting, and shaking, and hot and then cold,” Kardashian said on the show. “This virus has hit me like a ton of bricks, and it’s been really scary… It was really bad for a couple days.” Kardashian also dealt with a common but troublesome long-term side effect: telogen effluvium, a type of temporary hair loss. In fact, both Alyssa Milano and Drake have also spoken publicly about losing hair thanks to COVID-19 infections. Luckily, this type of stress-induced hair loss—technically a type of hair shedding—typically resolves on its own within months.After such an unpleasant experience the first time around, getting COVID-19 again is hardly a welcome experience. But even if being fully vaccinated doesn’t always prevent the infection, it is still highly effective at preventing severe complications—some of which require hospitalization—as well as death due to the disease.Related:

Road Test: Obé Ride Is a Cheerful—Yet Challenging—Take on Home Cycling Classes

Road Test: Obé Ride Is a Cheerful—Yet Challenging—Take on Home Cycling Classes

As one of the many people who purchased a stationary bike during the pandemic, I’ve also sampled my fair share of virtual cycling classes and apps. So when Obé Fitness announced it was introducing its own cycling classes, called Obé Ride, (or, more accurately, when one of their brightly colored Instagram ads grabbed my attention), I knew I wanted to try them out.In the ever-expanding world of streaming fitness classes, Obé stands out for its Instagram-friendly colorful, upbeat vibe. Like me, you’ve probably spotted their dance, yoga, and Pilates classes on your feed before, but Ride just launched in October. Over the course of about two weeks, I took four cycling classes on Obé, including two on-demand rhythm-based classes, one live rhythm-based class, and one on-demand HIIT class. All of my classes were less than 30 minutes and featured dance and pop soundtracks.The price to become an Obé member is $27 per month, $65 per quarter, or $199 per year. With a subscription, you can take an unlimited amount of classes—both live and on-demand, and quarterly and annual members get access to some special classes as well. For Ride classes, you can use any type of stationary bike. Obé gave me a complimentary membership to try their new indoor cycling classes. So here’s what I thought after testing out a few of the current Ride offerings.There are two main categories of Ride classes, which you can take live or on-demand.Ride classes are either structured like a standard cardio HIIT-based class, with short periods of intense work interspersed with lighter recovery periods, or with Obé’s characteristic rhythm-based choreography. (If you’re wondering how dance choreography works on a stationary bike, so was I! We’ll get there.)One thing I found to be lacking right now on the app is variety in cycling classes. There are about four live Ride classes per week and once a live class has ended, it eventually goes into the on-demand library. As of this writing, however, there are only 16 classes available in the library—and only one HIIT class. So if you’re used to scrolling through the years-long Peloton back catalog, you might feel a little limited on the Obé app right now.During the live ride, the instructor said hello and gave encouragement to specific people by their first names. (In my class, the instructor noted that I was one of two Sarahs who were new to Obé, which felt like a nice welcome!) I was a little frustrated, though, because when I tuned into the class right on time, it had clearly already been going for a minute or two so I missed the beginning. And it went a good five minutes longer than I thought it would go. Five minutes isn’t the end of the world, of course, but it’s tough to fit a live class into a busy day if you don’t know exactly how long it’s going to take.

Do You Need to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine If You Already Had the Virus?

Do You Need to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine If You Already Had the Virus?

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) examined the protective effects of the COVID-19 vaccine compared to immunity after a coronavirus infection. The findings confirm that the most effective protection against COVID-19 comes from vaccines—even for people who have had the virus previously. For the study, published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, researchers used data from a network of 187 hospitals in nine states between January and September of 2021. That data included information for 1,020 people who were unvaccinated but had a previous COVID-19 infection (89 of whom tested positive at the hospital, 8.7%) and 6,328 people who were fully vaccinated and had not previously had a COVID-19 infection (324 of whom tested positive, 5.1%). For all participants, their vaccination or previous infection occurred between three and six months before their positive test.Based on these findings, the authors concluded that the protection from the vaccine was more helpful than the immunity gained through a previous COVID-19 infection. In fact, those who were unvaccinated but had a previous infection were more than five times more likely to develop a COVID-19 infection three to six months later than those who were fully vaccinated and had never had the virus. “Vaccine-induced immunity was more protective than infection-induced immunity against laboratory-confirmed COVID-19,” the study authors wrote, including during a time when the delta variant was the predominant strain in the U.S. There are now three COVID-19 vaccines available for adults in the U.S., and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is also available for kids ages 12 to 15. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also just authorized the Pfizer vaccine for younger children, between the ages of five and 10, last week. The findings from this study are in line with current CDC recommendations that pretty much everyone ages 12 and older should receive a COVID-19 vaccine, regardless of whether or not they’ve had the infection. While the level of protection that people may get after an infection can be different from individual to individual, the protection from the vaccine is generally long-lasting and predictable, the CDC says. The agency also recommends against using antibody testing to make a decision about whether or not vaccination is necessary.“We now have additional evidence that reaffirms the importance of COVID-19 vaccines, even if you have had prior infection,” Rochelle P. Walensky, M.D., M.P.H., director of the CDC, said in a statement about the study. “The best way to stop COVID-19, including the emergence of variants, is with widespread COVID-19 vaccination and with disease prevention actions such as mask-wearing, washing hands often, physical distancing, and staying home when sick.”Related:

Mila Kunis Says Ashton Kutcher Was Hospitalized for Pancreatitis Twice While Preparing for ‘Jobs’

Mila Kunis Says Ashton Kutcher Was Hospitalized for Pancreatitis Twice While Preparing for ‘Jobs’

While preparing to play Steve Jobs in the 2013 movie Jobs, Ashton Kutcher went on a strict raw fruit and vegetable diet—and it led him to be hospitalized twice, according to his wife Mila Kunis. In a new episode of Hot Ones on YouTube, Kunis shared new details about the way Kutcher’s extreme eating habits affected his health.Previously, Kutcher appeared on this show himself and said that he’d developed pancreatitis after drinking too much carrot juice. So, host Sean Evans asked Kunis about her memories of the experience. “He’s downplaying it,” she replied. “He was so dumb. He also, I think, only ate grapes at one point.”She continued, “It was so stupid. We ended up in the hospital twice with pancreatitis. So, fact check, yes. It was really dumb.”In his 2019 Hot Ones episode, Kutcher recalled the painful experience. “I was studying [Steve Jobs’s] eating habits and his behaviors and was told that he drank a lot of carrot juice. So I started drinking carrot juice non-stop, like, all day long,” he said. “Two weeks before we went to start shooting, all of a sudden I had this pain in my back. And through the night it got worse and worse and worse. I ended up in the hospital on the maximum dose of Dilaudid because my pancreas was, like, crazy out of whack.”Pancreatitis is a condition in which the pancreas becomes inflamed, and it can be either acute or chronic (meaning it comes and goes multiple times or is an ongoing issue). For most people, pancreatitis is a painful but short-term illness that goes away within a few days with treatment, which might include pain medication (like the Dilaudid that Kutcher received), the Mayo Clinic explains. Severe bouts of pancreatitis can be exceedingly painful and lead to serious complications, such as kidney failure, infection in the pancreas, and damage to the pancreas that can increase your risk for diabetes or pancreatic cancer.It’s not entirely clear how restrictive eating habits or malnutrition might cause pancreatitis, but researchers have noted that it’s not an uncommon condition among people with eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia. Pancreatitis occurs when digestive enzymes that the pancreas makes become activated inside the organ, causing inflammation and damage. Some studies have shown that malnutrition can cause damage to pancreatic cells and ducts, possibly making pancreatitis more likely. But experts are still investigating the exact mechanisms involved.So if you notice any symptoms that could be signs of pancreatitis (such as intense back or upper abdomen pain along with a fever, nausea, vomiting, tenderness, or a rapid heart rate), you should follow Kutcher’s example and get medical attention.Related:

Brooke Shields Shared a Recovery Update and Gym Progress Video After Breaking Her Femur

Brooke Shields Shared a Recovery Update and Gym Progress Video After Breaking Her Femur

After breaking a bone in her thigh earlier this year, Brooke Shields shared that she’s made great progress in her recovery. Shields appeared at the American Ballet Theatre Fall Gala in New York City this week feeling a lot more like herself. “This is the first time I’m really in heels and walking any length of time,” she told Page Six at the event. But her recovery is still a work in progress. “I’m definitely still in rehab,” she said in the interview. “Every time I think I’m strong enough, I realize I have to go back to [physical therapy].”Shields broke her femur back in January when she fell off a balance board during a workout, she told People. She described the pain as “excruciating.” Shields then spent more than two weeks in the hospital where she underwent procedures to implant a metal plate to secure the bone and two metal rods in her hip. Unfortunately, there were complications after her hospital stay, including a staph infection, which required her to return to the hospital and receive emergency surgery.Since then, however, Shields has been on the mend and shared gradual recovery updates along the way. In February, she shared Instagram videos of herself using a walker in the hospital and working on physical therapy exercises. In late March, she shared photos of herself in a hospital bed and of her leg in a cast. “Rehabbing and rebuilding,” she captioned an Instagram slideshow of photos showing her perform strengthening exercises on a mat. Most recently, Shields shared a video of herself working on leg exercises in the gym to show how far she’s come. “Getting back into the swing of things,” she captioned the Instagram post. Shields’s return to the gym shows just how far she’s come over the course of the year—especially after an accident that, at one time, she feared may have left her paralyzed, Page Six says. “I don’t like something getting the better of me,” she said. “Especially not a silly, dumb accident.”Related:

The FDA Just Authorized Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine for Kids Under 12

The FDA Just Authorized Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine for Kids Under 12

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just authorized the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for use in kids under the age of 12. Kids between the ages of five and 11 are now eligible to get the two-dose mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, according to the FDA’s emergency use authorization (EUA). As with adults, the vaccine is administered in two separate doses given three weeks apart. But the dose for kids in this age group is smaller than the dose used in adults and those age 12 and up.The FDA’s decision to expand Pfizer’s original authorization to include younger children is based in part on a clinical trial that included more than 3,100 kids between the ages of five and 11 who received the vaccine and another 1,500 children who received a placebo. In this study, the most common side effects after the shot were generally temporary and similar to those seen in older age groups, such as pain and redness at the injection site, headaches, and muscle pain. In clinical trials including children in this age group, the vaccine was 90.7% effective at preventing COVID-19 illness.And there are surveillance programs in place (from both government agencies and Pfizer) to monitor for rarer and more severe potential side effects that tend to show up more frequently in younger people. In particular, those systems will be on the lookout for cases of myocarditis and pericarditis, forms of heart inflammation, which have so far most frequently developed in young adult and adolescent males, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).“As a mother and a physician, I know that parents, caregivers, school staff, and children have been waiting for today’s authorization. Vaccinating younger children against COVID-19 will bring us closer to returning to a sense of normalcy,” Janet Woodcock, M.D., acting FDA commissioner, said in a press release. “Our comprehensive and rigorous evaluation of the data pertaining to the vaccine’s safety and effectiveness should help assure parents and guardians that this vaccine meets our high standards.”The EUA comes after the FDA’s advisory panel unanimously voted (with one abstention) that the potential benefits of using the vaccine in this age group outweigh the potential harms. Previously, the Pfizer vaccine, also called Comirnaty, received authorization for use in kids ages 12 to 15 back in May of this year. It was originally authorized for use in people ages 16 and older in December 2020 and received full FDA approval in August 2021.Vaccinating this younger age group will be a huge milestone in our battle to better contain the COVID-19 pandemic, as Anthony Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said earlier this year. And although some dynamics of the pandemic in the U.S. have changed since then (including the rise of the highly transmissible delta variant), authorizing a COVID-19 vaccine for kids will undoubtedly help protect them and the rest of their community. Children are less likely than adults to develop severe complications from the coronavirus, but they can definitely still get the virus. And at this stage of the pandemic, with about 57% of the population fully vaccinated and the delta variant responsible for the majority of cases, kids too young to get the shots now account for an increasing chunk of new COVID-19 cases in the U.S. Next up, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will meet next week to discuss the guidelines for implementing the FDA’s authorization and may fine-tune the exact recommendations for who should receive the vaccine. But, for now, the FDA’s authorization will be welcome news to many parents of (currently) unvaccinated kids—especially those whose children have returned to in-person learning this school year.Related:

Kelly Osbourne Celebrates 5 Months of Sobriety After Her Relapse With a Sweet Instagram Photo

Kelly Osbourne Celebrates 5 Months of Sobriety After Her Relapse With a Sweet Instagram Photo

Kelly Osbourne is celebrating a birthday and a recovery milestone this week: She’s now five months sober after experiencing a relapse during the COVID-19 pandemic.“Today marks my 37th birthday and I’m 5 months sober!!!” Osbourne wrote on Instagram. “I am filled with so much gratitude it’s almost overwhelming! 💜” Alongside the caption, she shared a photo of herself with a strawberry birthday cake and a screenshot of the Twelve Steps app confirming her sobriety milestone.Over the years, Osbourne has been open about the ups and downs of her alcohol and drug use as well as her recovery journey. Previously, she had been sober for about four years. But in a June episode of Red Table Talk, Osbourne revealed that she had gradually slid back into problematic drinking behaviors during the pandemic.“For the first two days I could handle just having one drink, but it was because I sat there and was like, ‘You’re only having one drink, you’re going to prove to everyone that you’re normal now and you can do this,’” she said in the interview. “And all of a sudden everything’s falling apart.”Osbourne said that she tends to be a “closet drinker” and keeps those behaviors from others. So it was, of course, frustrating and painful to realize that she needed to cut back and get honest with herself and those around her. But it was also an opportunity to examine where she still holds past trauma, she said. With the support of her loved ones, including her brother Jack, Osbourne entered outpatient treatment and focused on building up other self-care behaviors, such as breathwork. And, five months later, it seems like that hard work is paying off.Related:

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