Sarah Jacoby

Nearly 1 in 4 People With COVID-19 Have Brain Fog Months After Their Infection

Nearly 1 in 4 People With COVID-19 Have Brain Fog Months After Their Infection

In a new study, almost a quarter of people with COVID-19 reported symptoms of brain fog, including memory issues, months after their diagnosis.The study, published last week in JAMA Network Open, includes survey responses from 740 people who’d had COVID-19 about their demographics and the cognitive symptoms they still experienced. On average, the participants were between seven and eight months out from their initial COVID-19 diagnosis. Of those participants, nearly a quarter reported having issues with memory recall (23% of participants, 170 people) and memory encoding (24%, 178 participants). Participants also frequently reported having problems with executive functioning, processing speed, and verbal fluency. Many of these issues may be symptoms of what’s colloquially referred to as brain fog, the study authors write. People who experience brain fog may find that they have trouble thinking or processing information clearly. They might have difficulty concentrating or find that it takes them longer than usual to complete certain mental tasks. Brain fog can be the result of mental health issues (such as anxiety, depression, or chronic stress) or certain underlying medical conditions (including multiple sclerosis).This study is relatively small, but its findings are in line with those from previous studies. A study published about a year ago found that the majority of people who are hospitalized with COVID-19 experience some sort of neurological issues, including headaches and dizziness but also cognitive problems. And other research published in April found that even people whose illnesses aren’t severe enough to require hospitalization can still experience brain fog-like symptoms after COVID-19. In fact, that study found that a third of people who got the coronavirus developed neurological conditions within six months of their diagnosis. It’s not clear yet why COVID-19 survivors are so likely to experience neurological symptoms, including those that might constitute brain fog. Researchers are still looking into whether it’s the coronavirus directly causing long-lasting cognitive issues or if brain fog might be related to the trauma associated with surviving a new viral illness in the midst of a global pandemic. As this research and other investigations into the mysteries of long COVID continue, we’ll hopefully learn more soon. In the meantime, another recent study showed that getting vaccinated against COVID-19 can significantly help prevent long COVID in the event of a breakthrough infection.Related:

Here’s Why Ed Sheeran Is Apologizing for Having COVID-19

Here’s Why Ed Sheeran Is Apologizing for Having COVID-19

Ed Sheeran revealed on social media that he recently tested positive for COVID-19—and apologized to those who may have been expecting to see him perform.“Hey guys. Quick note to tell you that I’ve sadly tested positive for Covid, so I’m now self-isolating and following government guidelines,” Sheeran wrote on Instagram. “It means that I’m now unable to plough ahead with any in person commitments for now, so I’ll be doing as many of my planned interviews/performances I can from my house. Apologies to anyone I’ve let down. Be safe everyone x”The “Shape of You” singer is set to release his new album, Equals (written “=”), this week. But after testing positive, it appears that he’ll have to stick to virtual performances and interviews to support the album’s release—for now, at least.Sheeran did not say whether or not he was vaccinated in his Instagram post. Earlier this year, he reworked the lyrics of “Shape of You” to include lines about the value of getting vaccinated during an appearance on the Late Late Show With James Corden. In England, where Sheeran resides, people who test positive for COVID-19 must self-isolate for 10 days after the first day of noticeable symptoms or the day they test positive, according to the National Health Service. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the U.S. offers similar guidelines: People who test positive can be around others again 10 days after their symptoms started (or they received a positive test), provided they’ve gone at least 24 hours without a fever and their other symptoms are improving. Related:

Who Qualifies for COVID-19 Boosters Now? Here Are the New CDC Recommendations.

Who Qualifies for COVID-19 Boosters Now? Here Are the New CDC Recommendations.

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) panel voted to approve COVID-19 vaccine booster shots for even more people. A month ago, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended additional doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for some people who had previously received that mRNA vaccine. And this week, following an update to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) emergency use authorizations for the vaccines, the panel voted to recommend boosters for some groups of people who had also gotten the Moderna and Johnson and Johnson vaccines originally. Plus, the panel’s new recommendations allow people who are eligible for boosters to mix and match which vaccine they get.For those who may be wondering if they’re eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot, here’s what you need to know about the CDC’s new recommendations.If you originally got the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (Comirnaty):You’re eligible to get a booster shot if you are age 65 and older. You are also eligible if you’re at least 18 years old and you have an underlying medical condition (that puts you at a higher risk for severe COVID-19 complications), you live in a long-term care facility, or you live or work in other high-risk situations (such as first responders, grocery store workers, and other essential workers).You should wait at least six months after your initial vaccine doses before getting a booster.If you originally got the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine:In this week’s recommendations, ACIP recommended booster shots for the same groups of people who received Moderna doses originally as those who got Pfizer. So, if your first two vaccine doses were Moderna, you can get a booster shot if you are at least 65 years old. Or, if you’re at least 18 years old, you can get an additional dose provided you also have an underlying health issue, live in a long-term care situation, or live or work in other high-risk environments.Again, you should wait to get your booster shot until it’s been at least six months since you received your first doses. If you originally got the Johnson and Johnson (Janssen) COVID-19 vaccine:For those who are at least 18 years old and received the single-dose Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, you can get a booster shot just two months after your original dose. The CDC also echoed the FDA’s authorization for a mix and match vaccination strategy, meaning that those who are eligible for boosters based on the above criteria can get any of the three authorized or approved vaccines as their booster shot—no matter which one they got originally. Some people may want to stick with the same type of vaccine they had before while others may want to get a different one this time, the CDC says. Or, depending on the supply in their area, simply may not be able to match the vaccine they got previously.However, the CDC also emphasized that all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. are still safe and highly effective at preventing severe disease and death due to the coronavirus—even against the delta variant. For those who want or need extra protection, though, booster shots may make sense. If you’re not sure if you should get an additional dose, talk to your health care provider. And, remember, you can get your flu shot at the same time as your booster.Related:

Pro Wrestler Brandi Rhodes Says Postpartum Anxiety Gave Her the ‘Fear of Every Unknown Possible’

Pro Wrestler Brandi Rhodes Says Postpartum Anxiety Gave Her the ‘Fear of Every Unknown Possible’

Professional wrestler Brandi Rhodes and her husband, fellow All Elite Wrestling (AEW) performer Cody Rhodes, welcomed their daughter Liberty Iris in mid-June. Their first days with Liberty, who is named after Liberty Square in Disney’s Magic Kingdom rather than for her father’s patriotic wrestling gimmick (as fans might assume), were “so precious,” Brandi Rhodes, 38, tells SELF. But Rhodes also had to work through mental health challenges, including postpartum anxiety, as a new mom.Before giving birth, she and her medical team had already decided a scheduled C-section would be the best option for her because of the baby’s positioning. But Liberty came a little early. In fact, Rhodes recalls having contractions “for most of the day,” including during filming for the couple’s reality show Rhodes to the Top and an AEW virtual event before going to the hospital. “I always knew it was going to be sooner than we thought because my body felt very ready,” she explains. “My only prayer was that she was ready too.” Rhodes’ delivery process was surprisingly “quick and easy.” Being awake during her C-section was “a little weird,” she says, but she appreciated that the doctor talked her through the procedure. In the weeks following Liberty’s birth, however, the challenges of being a new mom started to take their toll on Rhodes. “I fully went through a period of postpartum anxiety or maybe a combination of anxiety and depression,” she says. “I lean more towards anxiety because I was so happy, but I was terrified at the same time. It was something I’d never felt before. It was a fear of every unknown possible.” Endless thoughts about something, anything that could go wrong “kept me up at night,” she says, like, “what if the ceiling leaked and broke and landed right in her crib while she was sleeping?”

Onions Were Linked to a Salmonella Outbreak in 37 States—Here’s What to Know

Onions Were Linked to a Salmonella Outbreak in 37 States—Here’s What to Know

Public health authorities have traced a salmonella outbreak affecting people in 37 states back to whole onions imported from Mexico. Now the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are urging consumers to check where their onions came from and, if the source is unclear, toss them.Specifically, public health agencies identified whole onions from ProSource Inc. (also called ProSource Produce LLC) as a potential source, the FDA says. The affected produce was imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, and includes whole, fresh onions in red, white, and yellow varieties. (If this is starting to sound familiar it might be because there was a massive onion recall due to salmonella contamination about a year ago.)ProSource voluntarily recalled all of its potentially contaminated onions with import dates between July 1, 2021, and August 27, 2021. “Descriptors of these onion types include, but are not limited to, jumbo, colossal, medium, and sweet onions,” according to the FDA release. The onions were sold to both restaurants and grocery stores nationwide, the CDC says.So far, the salmonella outbreak linked to whole onions has sickened 652 people and caused 129 hospitalizations, the CDC says. But no deaths have been reported in relation to the outbreak.The typical symptoms of a salmonella infection—diarrhea, stomach cramps, fever—usually start between six hours and six days of eating the contaminated food, the CDC says. For most people, the infection clears up on its own within a week, the CDC explains. But sometimes a salmonella infection can become more severe. And those who are younger than 5 years old, over age 65, and people with weakened immune systems are most likely to experience more serious salmonella symptoms. For now, the CDC and FDA are urging consumers to check their onions for stickers that indicate where they’re from. If you bought any whole, fresh red, white, or yellow ProSource Inc. onions imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, you should throw them out. If your onions don’t have a sticker on them or you’re not sure where they came from, you should err on the side of caution and dispose of them. You should also wash any surfaces that the onions came in contact with, the CDC says.And if you have severe symptoms (such as diarrhea for more than three days, vomiting that prevents you from keeping liquids down, or signs of dehydration), you should get in contact with a health care provider.Related:

Eve Revealed She’s Pregnant With Her First Child After Having Fibroids Removed

Eve Revealed She’s Pregnant With Her First Child After Having Fibroids Removed

Eve announced she’s pregnant after dealing with infertility issues related to fibroids. The rapper and former The Talk host shared a celebratory pregnancy announcement and photos on Instagram this week.“Can you believe it @mrgumball3000 we finally get to tell everyone!!!!!,” Eve wrote on Instagram, tagging her husband, Maximillion Cooper. “You all know how long [we’ve] been waiting for this blessing!!! We get to meet our lil human February 2022 🥰” Eve is stepmom to Cooper’s four kids, and is excited to welcome this addition to their family.The joyful announcement comes about a year after Eve revealed on an episode of The Talk that she had undergone a surgical procedure to remove fibroids in an effort to improve her chances of becoming pregnant. During the episode, the hosts discussed fertility and different roads to pregnancy. Sharon Osbourne mentioned that she had a friend who’d gotten pregnant at age 50.“Hearing that, for me, Mrs. O, that gives me so much hope because I think as women we’re always told when you reach a certain age, you’re too old, you should have done this then,” Eve responded, adding that she had just started reading fertility science book It Starts With the Egg. “I’m 42 now. You know, my husband and I, we’ve been trying and trying and trying, and we’ve been doing certain things,” she continued. “At the beginning of the year, I had a procedure called a myomectomy that gets rid of fibroids.” Eve then went on to say that she used to have “these horrible periods” due to her fibroids and encouraged other people with painful periods not to dismiss them as normal. “Go to your doctor and if they don’t believe you, go to another doctor,” she said, adding a shout-out to the health care professional who “changed my life.” 

Ronda Rousey Shared a Raw Breastfeeding Selfie Because Motherhood ‘Is Something to Brag About’

Ronda Rousey Shared a Raw Breastfeeding Selfie Because Motherhood ‘Is Something to Brag About’

Ronda Rousey wants to normalize breastfeeding and all that goes into new parenthood. It’s not something to hide or be ashamed of, she shared in an intimate Instagram post. Instead, it’s “something to brag about,” Rousey wrote.Rousey and her husband, fellow mixed martial artist Travis Browne, announced the birth of their daughter on September 27, 2021. Browne also has two sons, Keawe and Kaleo.This week, Rousey shared a photo of herself breastfeeding her new daughter, La’akea Makalapuaokalanipō (Pō). “Our boys asked me the other day how I’m gunna feed Pō on the plane when we take her with us to Hawaii. And I was like ‘uhhh, same way I always do,’” Rousey began the caption. “Then it occurred to me that they probably never seen anyone breastfeed before and weren’t sure if it was appropriate in public.”She continued, “Motherhood’s some badass, primal, beautiful shit that shouldn’t be hidden. It still blows my mind that my body assembled this little person, pushed her out and now makes everything she needs to thrive🤯 It’s really nothing to be ashamed of, it’s something to brag about.” Rousey then ended her post with the hashtags #normalizebreastfeeding and #proudmama.Breastfeeding is a totally normal, natural bodily process for both a new parent and their baby. Of course, it’s not something that’s right for everyone. But it’s also not something that anyone should feel like they need to hide or be ashamed of, as Rousey explained. Breastfeeding in public, however, can be tricky to navigate because there are so few designated spaces to do so comfortably. But statements like Rousey’s make it clear that breastfeeding is a perfectly normal thing to happen—and whether that’s at home, in public, or on a flight shouldn’t make a difference.In fact, Rousey is learning to embrace all facets of being a new mom, including the inevitable challenges. “After Pō’s roughest night since we brought her home (she was up feeding every hour all night) @travisbrownemma (aka best husband/dad ever🥰😍)made use of our stored up milk stash so I could take a 5 hour afternoon nap,” she wrote alongside an Instagram photo of herself, Browne, and Pō this week. “I emerged a new woman ready to take on another sleepless night.”Related:

The Fitbit Charge 5 Is a Lightweight, User-Friendly Fitness Tracker With Some Intriguing New Features

The Fitbit Charge 5 Is a Lightweight, User-Friendly Fitness Tracker With Some Intriguing New Features

Battery life is extremely important to me in a fitness tracker because I am personally not the best at remembering to charge my devices! I always appreciate that the Fitbit app displays the battery level as well as the device itself, which helps make it more obvious that it’s time to charge.ComfortThe Charge 5 is, without a doubt, the lightest and most comfortable tracker I’ve ever worn. I genuinely forgot I was wearing it most of the time until it buzzed with a notification. The band is made of a silky soft silicone that somehow managed not to get too grody, even after all my workouts. (It’s easy to clean too!)I also want to specifically call out the new standard wristband design, which is much more secure than the one I have on my Versa 2. There’s a double buckle that fits close to the skin and doesn’t come undone—even in my sleep.StyleI’m a health goth through and through, so I got a black silicone wristband and sport wristband…also in black silicone. But there are a few different Charge 5 styles and many wristbands to choose from. I found these wristbands much easier (and less painful) to swap out and click into place than those on the Versas, which always required lots of poking into my nails.Another thing I enjoy about the Charge 5 is the different clock faces you can choose from, most (maybe all) of which have dynamic aspects to them that subtly track how close you are to each of your goals for the day—you can pay attention or ignore them as much as you want. The watch face I ended up sticking with turned from bright purple to lime green over the course of the day as I got closer to my step and activity goals. That said, one thing I miss about the Versa models is the larger screen, which allowed for easier-to-read clock faces and text message notifications.SyncingWith my Versa and Versa 2 models, I rarely had any issues with syncing. I typically keep the Fitbit app open in the background and enable all-day syncing so that the whole process is continuous.But I did, unfortunately, have some persistent syncing issues with Charge 5. Every morning I’d wake up and the app would tell me it can’t sync the tracker. So I’d swipe down in the app to trigger another sync, and then it would connect. Is it the end of the world? No. But this is a new issue that I haven’t had with other Fitbits, and it’s one that does affect the tracker’s performance on a daily basis, which is frustrating. The only way to fix the problem was to completely unpair and repair the device with the Fitbit app, which improved but didn’t completely fix the issue—and required me to go through the entire setup process again.However, during and after workouts, I had very few issues with syncing, meaning my exercise data would sync very quickly and seamlessly to the app. There were a few times where I was exceedingly sweaty during cycling or on my back for a while in Pilates when the heart rate tracking would cut out for a few seconds before coming back, but that was it.Water ResistanceThe Charge 5 and the silicone wristbands are supposedly water-resistant up to 50 meters. And while I didn’t have the chance to put the tracker fully to that test, I did run it underwater in my bathroom sink and kept it on for a shower to give the water resistance a try. In both scenarios, the Charge 5 still performed just fine.

Colin Powell, Former Secretary of State, Died Due to COVID-19 Complications

Colin Powell, Former Secretary of State, Died Due to COVID-19 Complications

Former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell died on Monday, October 18, 2021, at age 84 due to complications related to COVID-19. General Powell was fully vaccinated but had been undergoing treatment for cancer when he contracted the virus, CNN reported.“General Colin L. Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, passed away this morning due to complications from Covid 19. He was fully vaccinated,” his family wrote in a statement on Facebook. “We want to thank the medical staff at Walter Reed National Medical Center for their caring treatment. We have lost a remarkable and loving husband, father, grandfather and a great American.”The family did not release any details about the kind of complications Powell experienced, but his immune system was compromised because he’d been undergoing treatment for multiple myeloma, the New York Times reported. Multiple myeloma is a type of cancer that affects plasma cells, which are a category of white blood cells. These cells play a crucial role in the immune system by helping to create the antibodies that protect against bacteria and viruses, the Mayo Clinic says. In someone with multiple myeloma, though, cancer cells build up in the body’s bone marrow and make it harder for healthy plasma cells to do their job. Treatment for multiple myeloma can include chemotherapy, which may also negatively impact the immune system and make patients more vulnerable to infectious diseases such as COVID-19.Vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, also rely on those antibodies to create a long-lasting immune response that can help protect against certain illnesses. The best evidence we have right now suggests that people who are immunocompromised—due to an underlying condition or chemotherapy, for instance—don’t get as much protection from the COVID-19 vaccines as those who are not immunocompromised. Getting a booster shot may give immunocompromised people extra protection, but Powell’s family did not specify whether or not he had received one.Related:

Former President Bill Clinton Is ‘On the Mend’ After Hospitalization

Former President Bill Clinton Is ‘On the Mend’ After Hospitalization

Former President Bill Clinton is recovering after being hospitalized for an infection on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. The illness was not related to COVID-19 but rather a urinary tract infection (UTI) that spread to Clinton’s bloodstream, CNN reported.Clinton, 75, was “taken to UC Irvine Medical Center and diagnosed with an infection. He was admitted to the ICU for close monitoring and administered IV antibiotics and fluids. He remains at the hospital for continuous monitoring,” according to a statement obtained from Alpesh Amin, M.D., chair of medicine at the hospital, and Lisa Bardack, M.D., Bill and Hillary Clinton’s longtime personal physician. “After two days of treatment, his white blood cell count is trending down and he is responding to antibiotics well,” the statement continued. “The California-based medical team has been in constant communication with the President’s New York-based medical team, including his cardiologist. We hope to have him go home soon.” Although the official statement doesn’t specifically mention the underlying reason for Clinton’s illness, CNN reported that he was hospitalized for a UTI that spread to the bloodstream, which started with feelings of fatigue on Tuesday. A UTI develops when bacteria enter and multiply in the urinary tract (which includes the urethra, bladder, and kidneys), the Mayo Clinic explains. Most commonly, the infection starts in the urethra and/or bladder and causes symptoms such as a burning sensation when peeing, an increased need to urinate, pelvic pain, or a pink or reddish tint to the urine (which may indicate blood in the urine). However, not everyone experiences the same symptoms. And in older adults especially, the symptoms can be mistaken for other issues, the Mayo Clinic says.In severe cases, the bacteria may travel up to the kidneys and eventually get into the bloodstream, at which point the infection can cause a potentially life-threatening condition called sepsis. Urinary tract infections are typically treated with oral antibiotics, but when a UTI gets to this severe stage, hospitalization and IV antibiotics may be required.As of the most recent update, President Clinton is still in the ICU but is “on the mend, in good spirits, and incredibly thankful to the doctors, nurses, and staff providing him with excellent care,” Angel Urena, the former president’s spokesman, said in a statement. Back in 2004, he underwent quadruple bypass surgery, and in 2010, he underwent a procedure to implant two stents. But President Clinton’s doctors emphasized to CNN that the current hospitalization is not related to his heart or COVID-19.Related:

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