Maggie ONeill

Serena Williams on Choosing Family Over Tennis: “I Don’t Think It’s Fair”

Serena Williams on Choosing Family Over Tennis: “I Don’t Think It’s Fair”

Serena Williams shared her feelings on motherhood—and never wanting to “choose between tennis and a family”—in a new essay for Vogue, published Tuesday. The 40-year-old tennis star wrote that her feelings on retirement are conflicted—“I’m torn: I don’t want it to be over, but at the same time I’m ready for what’s next”—adding that even the word retirement makes her uneasy. “I’ve never liked the word retirement. It doesn’t feel like a modern word to me,” Williams wrote.Williams, who has won 23 Grand Slam titles during her legendary career, wrote that she’ll miss playing the sport that has given her “some of the happiest times,” but that she’s excited by the prospect of growing her family. Still, she wrote, she knows that her tennis career might not be ending right now if not for her gender. “I don’t think it’s fair,” she wrote. “If I were a guy, I wouldn’t be writing this because I’d be out there playing and winning while my wife was doing the physical labor of expanding our family.”Williams wrote that she and her husband, Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, have been trying to have another child. “We recently got some information from my doctor that put my mind at ease and made me feel that whenever we’re ready, we can add to our family.” She acknowledged that she didn’t want to endure pregnancy again as a professional athlete. In an essay for Elle published in April, Williams explained how her childbirth experience led to life-threatening complications and required four surgeries. After having a C-section, Williams had a pulmonary embolism that a nurse initially did not take seriously, an experience she also spoke about in a 2018 Vogue cover story.Still, she writes, she “loved every second of being pregnant with Olympia.” “I was one of those annoying women who adored being pregnant and was working until the day I had to report to the hospital—although things got super complicated on the other side,” Williams wrote.Her words underscore the difficulties that female athletes face when balancing the challenges of pregnancy and the demands of a rigorous training schedule: “A lot of people don’t realize that I was two months pregnant when I won the Australian Open in 2017. But I’m turning 41 this month, and something’s got to give,” she wrote. Not to mention the time constraints, which Williams also touched on, writing that, before having Olympia, she feared she’d have to rely on others to watch her child: “I figured that if I ever did have a baby, I would have people taking care of it 24/7.”But that hasn’t been the case for Williams: Even while traveling the world and breaking record after record, she has maintained what she described as a “hands-on” approach as a mother. “Olympia has only spent one 24-hour period away from me…. The fact is that nothing is a sacrifice for me when it comes to Olympia,” she wrote. “These days, if I have to choose between building my tennis résumé and building my family, I choose the latter.”

The U.S. Declared a Monkeypox State of Emergency—Here’s What You Need to Know

The U.S. Declared a Monkeypox State of Emergency—Here’s What You Need to Know

The Biden administration declared the monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency Thursday, with U.S. cases topping 6,600, according to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).“We’ve prepared to take our response to the next level in addressing this virus, and we urge every American to take monkeypox seriously,” Xavier Becerra, the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), said in a news briefing on the declaration, per reporting from The New York Times.A state of emergency lasts 90 days but can be renewed by the HHS Secretary. The declaration gives public health authorities the flexibility to respond to a health crisis in ways they normally can’t—for instance, giving the CDC access to the Infectious Diseases Rapid Response Reserve Fund, which can be used to “prevent, prepare for, or respond to an infectious disease emergency,” per the HHS. Practically, that could mean temporarily appointing public health officials to respond to the crisis or launching investigations into the treatment and prevention of monkeypox (though those specifics aren’t known at this time).Secretary Becerra is also considering a separate declaration that would give federal officials the power to expedite medical countermeasures (like monkeypox vaccines) before they complete the normal federal review process, per reporting from The Washington Post.The HHS state of emergency declaration follows a similar announcement from the World Health Organization (WHO), which declared monkeypox a public health emergency of international concern in July. “We have an outbreak that has spread around the world rapidly, through new modes of transmission, about which we understand too little,” the WHO director general said in a July 23 statement.Secretary Beccera’s announcement comes after California, New York, and Illinois individually declared states of emergency due to the monkeypox outbreak—and as the public grows concerned over access to preventative measures (like wide-scale testing) and vaccines. The first monkeypox case of 2022 in the U.S. was reported in Massachusetts in May; in June the HHS announced an “enhanced nationwide vaccination strategy to mitigate the spread of monkeypox.” A June 28 statement on the strategy said the HHS would provide Americans 296,000 doses of the Jynneos vaccine (the only FDA-approved vaccine designed to treat monkeypox, specifically).However, the vaccine rollout has been slow, and even in states that do have access to the monkeypox vaccine, residents are struggling to make appointments to get vaccinated. Earlier this week, The New York Times reported that, early on during the outbreak, the HHS failed to ask the makers of the Jynneos vaccine—the Denmark-based biotechnology company Bavarian Nordic—to bottle the vaccines the U.S. already owned for distribution. By the time the ask was made, Bavarian Nordic had taken other orders and said it wouldn’t be able to package the U.S.-owned vaccines for distribution “for months.” To speed up the vaccine distribution process, the government is now trying to find another company that can package the vaccines, per The New York Times.The state of emergency status highlights the importance of being aware of monkeypox symptoms—and seeing a health care provider if you suspect you’ve been exposed to monkeypox and are experiencing concerning symptoms. Per the CDC, these symptoms include a skin rash, fever, muscle aches, backache, headache, swollen lymph nodes, exhaustion, chills, and cold- or flu-like respiratory symptoms. If you’ve been exposed to monkeypox and you’re experiencing symptoms, try to contact the provider you’re going to see before you arrive. By calling or emailing them ahead of time, you can allow the provider to make sure they take the necessary precautions to protect themself (and all others in their office) from potential exposure.Related:

A Legionnaires’ Outbreak in Napa County Has Caused One Death—Here’s What You Need to Know

A Legionnaires’ Outbreak in Napa County Has Caused One Death—Here’s What You Need to Know

One person has died and 11 others were hospitalized due to a Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Napa County, California, according to a statement from the county released August 3. The 12 people—all Napa County residents—have been diagnosed since July 11, and three are still hospitalized, the statement said.Legionnaires’ disease is a type of pneumonia (lung infection) caused by bacteria called Legionella that grow in warm water, the statement said. People can get sick after breathing in droplets or swallowing water contaminated with Legionella, per the Centers for Disease and Prevention (CDC). Legionella can grow and spread in man-made water systems such as sink faucets, showerheads, decorative water fountains, hot tubs, hot water tanks or heaters, plumbing systems, and cooling towers, which are structures that are part of a building’s cooling system that contain water and a fan, per the CDC.Napa County officials tested man-made water sources and found “high levels of Legionella bacteria” in a sample from the cooling tower at Embassy Suites Napa Valley, the statement said. None of the 12 residents diagnosed with Legionnaires’ had stayed in or visited the hotel. A Napa County health official said in the statement that during a Legionnaires’ outbreak it’s common to find more than one sore of Legionella; therefore, officials are still searching for other contaminated water sources.The CDC says that Legionnaires’ is not generally spread person-to-person—meaning you’d most likely have to ingest or swallow droplets of the contaminated water to get sick—but acknowledges that this may be possible. The person who died from the current outbreak in Napa County was over 50 years old and had “high risk factors for severe disease,” per the statement. People at increased risk include former or current smokers, people with chronic lung disease, people with weak immune systems, people with cancer, people with underlying illnesses (such as kidney failure, liver failure, or diabetes), and people over 50, per the CDC.The U.S. sees an estimated 25,000 Legionnaires’ cases each year, per the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH); the disease can occur sporadically or in outbreaks. Symptoms of Legionnaires’ include shortness of breath, cough, fever, headaches, and muscle aches; it has also been associated with nausea, diarrhea, and confusion, per the CDC, which notes that Legionnaires’ symptoms usually occur within 2 to 14 days of exposure to Legionella. However, it can take longer for these signs to show up.If you develop the symptoms associated with Legionnaires’, you should see a doctor immediately, per the CDC. Multiple tests can be done to provide an accurate diagnosis. A chest X-ray can confirm that a person has pneumonia; from there, doctors can take a urine test or a phlegm sample to determine whether the pneumonia was caused by Legionella bacteria. (Also worth noting: Legionella bacteria can cause a milder illness called Pontiac fever, which can be diagnosed with similar tests.) The CDC says that if you seek medical treatment for Legionnaires’ symptoms, you should let your provider know if you believe you have been exposed to Legionella, spent nights away from home, used a hot tub, or stayed in a hospital during the last two weeks.Legionnaires’ can be treated with antibiotics, but the recovery period can last for a few weeks following illness, per the National Health Service (NHS) of the U.K. Treatment is successful for most people with the condition—though hospitalization may be required in severe cases. Related:

Should I Be Getting Another Polio Vaccine?

Should I Be Getting Another Polio Vaccine?

The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) is urging all New Yorkers to get the polio vaccine, if they haven’t done so already, following a case of polio last month in Rockland County, according to a statement released August 1.Polio, caused by poliovirus, is a potentially life-threatening disease that causes paralysis in about one of every 200 people infected, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Thanks to vaccines developed in the 1950s and 1960s, polio—which spreads via person-to-person contact—was officially considered eliminated in North America in 1994, according to the Mayo Clinic. However, the CDC notes the U.S. has been “polio-free” since 1979 due to the success of these vaccines.Even so, vaccination against polio, which hasn’t been eradicated worldwide, is still recommended for children in the U.S. “The polio vaccine is currently part of the standard vaccine schedule recommended by the CDC,” Cory Fisher, DO, a family medicine physician at Cleveland Clinic, tells SELF. “It is given in four separate doses over the first five years of life.”In much of the country, children have to get the polio vaccine to attend public school, Gail Shust, MD, pediatric infectious diseases specialist and clinical associate professor of medicine at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF.The vaccination rate is high in many—but not all—regions of the U.S., Dr. Fisher adds: “There are pockets of unvaccinated individuals in certain communities—like the one in Rockland County where an unvaccinated man contracted the disease—leaving them at especially high risk.” (The polio vaccination rate for two year olds in Rockland County is 60.5%, compared to a statewide average of 79.1%, per the NYSDOH.)The recent case is catching the attention of experts because it’s so surprising. “This case is quite significant, representing the first case in the U.S. in almost 10 years,” Dr. Fisher says. The last known case in the U.S. occurred in 2013, per the NYSDOH. The new case in New York also highlights the need to make sure you and your children are vaccinated and, thus, protected from polio. “All New Yorkers who are unvaccinated, including children 2 months and older, those who are pregnant, and people who have not completed their polio vaccine series previously, should get vaccinated right away,” the NYSDOH statement said. “We don’t have any treatment for polio. If you or your children haven’t been vaccinated, you should definitely go and do that now,” Dr. Shust says.How long does a polio vaccine last—and who should consider a booster?Given all the news of disease outbreaks—from COVID-19 to monkeypox—it’s understandable to wonder whether a polio booster dose should be in your future. But, as of right now, unless you live, work, or go to school in Rockland County (or are traveling to a country where polio is endemic, which includes Afghanistan and Pakistan, per the CDC) the answer to that is no, experts say. According to the CDC, three doses of the inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) are 99% to 100% effective at preventing polio.

Banana Boat Spray Sunscreen Recalled Due to Traces of Cancer-Causing Chemical

Banana Boat Spray Sunscreen Recalled Due to Traces of Cancer-Causing Chemical

Three batches of a Banana Boat sunscreen have been voluntarily recalled because they contain trace levels of a carcinogen called benzene, according to a statement from Edgewell Personal Care, the makers of Banana Boat products. The product is called Banana Boat Hair & Scalp Sunscreen Spray SPF 30 and is packaged in an aerosol can. Benzene is a chemical created through both human activities (such as secondhand tobacco smoke and industrial emissions) and natural processes (such as forest fires), per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI).Benzene was detected in the product during internal testing, per Edgewell’s statement. Benzene isn’t an ingredient in the sunscreen product, and it is believed that the benzene detected during testing came from the propellant that dispels the sunscreen from its container, per the statement.The recalled products, which were distributed nationwide, were all packaged in six-ounce cans and include the following data on the label:Universal product code (UPC): 0-79656-04041-8; lot code: 20016AF; expiration: December 2022Universal product code (UPC): 0-79656-04041-8; lot code: 20084BF; expiration: February 2023Universal product code (UPC): 0-79656-04041-8; lot code: 21139AF; expiration: April 2024If you have one of the affected cans, you should stop using it and discard the product immediately, per the statement. Edgewell said it had notified retailers to remove any recalled products from shelves, and Banana Boat is offering reimbursement to people who purchased a recalled can. (You can call 1-888-686-3988 or visit this website to receive a reimbursement.)This isn’t the first time a sunscreen product has been recalled over benzene concerns; last year, several Johnson & Johnson products, including some Neutrogena and Aveeno sunscreens, were recalled after testing revealed the presence of the chemical, SELF previously reported.People can be exposed to benzene via inhalation, orally, or through the skin, and it can potentially lead to certain cancers and blood disorders, per the NCI. While exposure to the recalled products isn’t thought to be harmful, people should contact a health care provider if they experience “any problems related to using these aerosol sunscreen products,” Edgewell’s statement said.If you do experience an adverse reaction to the recalled product, you can report it to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program online.Related:

Hugh Jackman Reveals How He Got Into Journaling for His Mental Health

Hugh Jackman Reveals How He Got Into Journaling for His Mental Health

Actor Hugh Jackman spoke about changing ideas of masculinity and how he journals every day to address his own “stunted” emotions during an interview with Vanity Fair editor-in-chief Radhika Jones at Condé Nast’s New York office Thursday morning. The 53-year-old X-Men star and Australia native said he’s happy to see traditional attitudes toward masculinity evolving—both within the entertainment industry and beyond.“A lot of what I grew up with in Australia, a very patriarchal society, is being entirely challenged and broken down daily: This whole idea, when I was growing up, that somehow girls became women but you had to make boys into men—had to push them, challenge them,” Jackman said.He added that, as a child, he thought feeling fear was somehow off limits to him: “I was actually quite a scared kid. I remember being scared a lot, but you weren’t allowed to be scared.” Now, however, he sees a reversal of that mentality in society, and within himself. “Men are being encouraged to be empathetic, to understand your feelings, to have a vocabulary around feeling,” he said.For Jackman, a specific journaling practice recommended by his therapist has proved an invaluable tool in thinking about these emotions. “I, in the last year, started a journal that starts with two words: ‘I feel.’ It was a bit of homework, and I sort of went, Journaling, ugh. And now, every morning I do it, obsessively, because I realized how stunted I was.” Jackman said the habit brought to light how confused he felt about his own emotions. “I would write ‘confused’ a lot, and my therapist said, ‘Confused: that’s a red flag. Confused just means there’s more than one thing you’re feeling. Just list what the things are.’ I realized how stunted I was around that.”Jackman also said that, in addition to journaling, he’s started being more open with his children about his emotions. “In the last year, I’ve changed the way I talk to them. Prior to a year ago, I thought my job was to keep fear away from them—don’t burden them with your worries,” he said of his 17- and 22-year-old kids. “Now I’m literally the opposite, and they love it,” he went on. “I don’t try to indulge myself with them, but I just let them know they’re not the only ones [who are worried]. I’m 53, I’ve done a lot of things, and I still feel all those things.”The fact that cultural ideas around masculinity—and the way men express their feelings and emotions—are shifting gives Jackman hope: “I think it’s changing so much for the better, and I think it’s a fantastic thing.”Related:

988, a New National Suicide Hotline, Launches Tomorrow

988, a New National Suicide Hotline, Launches Tomorrow

A new national suicide hotline, 988, becomes operational nationwide tomorrow, July 16. People experiencing a mental health emergency, such as suicidal thoughts, a substance use crisis, or any other emotionally distressing event, will be able to call during times of crisis, but operators will also be available via text and online chat (at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat), according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).The 988 hotline will essentially replace the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK); however, the previous hotline will not be discontinued when 988 is rolled out, and callers will be directed to the same services offered via 988. Mental health experts say the new hotline will provide necessary updates to the services currently provided by the 1-800 number, chief among them a focus on sending trained experts to respond to mental health emergencies, rather than law enforcement who are unfamiliar with protocols when approaching suicidal individuals.Suicide hotlines are a crucial aspect of mental health services: In 2021 alone, 3.6 million people reached out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, Dani Bennett, a press officer at the SAMHSA, tells SELF.One major improvement is that the new number will be easier for people to remember during a mental health emergency. “The traditional number is hard to remember. When we have a medical emergency, we immediately know 911,” Robert Gebbia, the chief executive officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, tells SELF. “This is similar. When there’s a mental health crisis, people will remember 988.”Experts expect the convenience of the new hotline to increase the number of callers. “We think there will be an increase in call volume,” Gebbia says. In fact, the SAMHSA predicts that the call volume will double within 12 months of the transition to 988, Bennett says.Below, how they think the new system will save lives, and what exactly will happen when someone reaches out to 988 for help.What happens when you call 988?When a person contacts the updated suicide prevention hotline, they’ll be directed to a local crisis center (based on their area code). If nobody at the local center is available to take their call, the caller will be directed to a backup crisis center. They’ll be able to speak to a trained crisis counselor in either English or Spanish; additionally, automated translation services for over 250 additional languages will be available, according to press materials from SAMHSA.The local crisis centers are funded through state and federal funding, as well as private contributions, Gebbia says.The operators handling incoming calls will be specially trained.When someone dials a suicide hotline, the counselor who picks up on the other end has to efficiently deescalate the situation, Marianne Goodman, MD, a clinical professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and director of the Suicide Prevention Research and Care Center at James J. Peters Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, tells SELF. She cites a 2011 study published in Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, for which 153 suicide attempt survivors were interviewed. Researchers asked them how long it took to attempt suicide after they had decided to attempt suicide. Nearly a quarter (24%) of participants said it took less than five minutes. “There’s a very small window between when somebody has the urge and actually acts on the urge. You’ve got to act quickly,” Dr. Goodman says. “You really need people who have an elevated level of expertise.”

Why Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Are Having Trouble Getting Their Meds Post-Roe

Why Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Are Having Trouble Getting Their Meds Post-Roe

According to a May 24 report by Christina Cauterucci in Slate, some pharmacists in Texas were already unsure—even before Roe was officially overturned—if they should fill prescriptions for methotrexate now, in part because a Texas law has specifically named the medication as “abortion-inducing.”It’s true that methotrexate is used to treat ectopic pregnancies, which occur when a fetus develops outside the uterus; they aren’t viable pregnancies. But methotrexate is used primarily to treat people with debilitating conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, Cuoghi Edens, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago Medicine, tells SELF. There are five million methotrexate prescriptions each year in the U.S. and only about 100,000 ectopic pregnancies, Dr. Edens notes, adding,“Methotrexate is really the standard of care.”In the context of rheumatoid arthritis, it’s an extremely common drug: About 90% of patients take it at some point to manage symptoms, according to the Arthritis Foundation. It is often prescribed as pills; if these don’t provide relief, a provider may suggest a shot of the medication under the skin.Methotrexate also isn’t new: It was developed in the 1940s as a cancer treatment, according to the Arthritis Foundation, and Dr. Edens says it’s been used to treat both children and adults for decades. However, access may be limited in different ways as healthcare providers try navigating a post-Roe world. Doctors may be more hesitant to prescribe it to people capable of becoming pregnant—including children who are technically in this category—and pharmacists may be more hesitant to fill the prescriptions that do get written. Dr. Edens says she recently got a call from a colleague in Texas who told her about an 8-year-old girl who couldn’t access methotrexate because a pharmacist refused to fill her prescription for it. “This is going to negatively affect children,” Dr. Edens says, adding that patients who can’t access their methotrexate may be in more physical pain as a result. Additionally, limiting access to methotrexate could cause problems with other treatment options, since insurance companies often require patients to try methotrexate first before they agree to cover other treatment options, Dr. Edens says.One 27-year-old lupus patient in Virginia, Becky Schwarz, spoke with Newsweek after finding out methotrexate was no longer available to her. Shwarz says lupus takes a toll on her everyday life, making it difficult to walk for an extended period of time or stand for the duration of a shower. However, methotrexate provides relief for her symptoms: “I can go more consecutive days without pain than before [taking methotrexate], and on the days I am in pain, it isn’t as severe as it was,” she told Newsweek. In a June 30th tweet, Schwarz said: “Roe was overturned 6 days ago. in less than one week i lost access to healthcare that i need because the drug could be used to induce abortions.”

Here’s Who Can—and Should—Get the Monkeypox Vaccine Right Now

Here’s Who Can—and Should—Get the Monkeypox Vaccine Right Now

A nationwide monkeypox vaccination plan is finally in the works. On June 28, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced an “enhanced nationwide vaccination strategy” to try to slow the spread of monkeypox. “The strategy will vaccinate and protect those at-risk of monkeypox, prioritize vaccines for areas with the highest numbers of cases, and provide guidance to state, territorial, tribal, and local health officials to aide in their planning response efforts,” a statement from HHS said.The announcement comes as the current outbreak grows in the U.S. Since the first confirmed case was reported by the state of Massachusetts in mid-May, at least 349 other cases have been confirmed throughout the country, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); worldwide, there have been at least 5,115 confirmed cases in at least 51 countries at the time of publication.HHS will provide 296,000 doses of the Jynneos vaccine—the only FDA-approved vaccine designed to protect against monkeypox, in addition to smallpox, specifically—56,000 of which will be made available immediately, per the statement. More than 9,000 have already been dispensed, and 32 jurisdictions have requested vaccines. The remaining 240,000 doses will be available in the coming weeks, and HHS expects more than 1 million additional doses to be made available during the course of summer and fall 2022, per the statement.The statement says a number of factors will determine how many vaccines a given jurisdiction is given, including reported monkeypox cases in the region as well as the number of high-risk individuals in the region. (California, Illinois, and New York currently have the most confirmed cases in the U.S., per the CDC.)So, who can (and should) get a monkeypox vaccine right now?Right now only certain individuals are eligible for the monkeypox vaccine in the U.S. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is now recommending the Jynneos vaccine, which requires two doses given 28 days apart, for anyone who is high-risk following monkeypox exposure, per HHS. However, you can still get a vaccine after exposure–which means “close physical contact” with someone who either has a confirmed or presumed case of monkeypox—even if you’re not high-risk.In addition to those who have been exposed to the virus, certain individuals can get the vaccine as a precaution. This group includes men who have sex with men who have “recently had multiple sex partners in a venue where there was known to be monkeypox” or “in an area where monkeypox is spreading,” per the HHS. The current outbreak has largely affected this specific community, per the CDC, but anyone can get monkeypox, regardless of sexual orientation. And since close sexual contact isn’t the only way to be exposed to monkeypox, it’s important for people to consider other potential touchpoints with the virus—like travel-related exposure, particularly in areas with high case counts—the CDC says. In a statement to health care providers, the CDC says: “Do not limit concerns to men who report having sex with other men. Those who have any sort of close personal contact with people with monkeypox could potentially also be at risk for the disease.”What should you do if you think you’ve been exposed to monkeypox—and where can you get a vaccine?Vaccination locations will differ depending on where you live. In larger cities like New York and Los Angeles, you may be able to get a vaccine at a mass vaccination site; in smaller towns, you may have to request a vaccine from a primary care provider or family medicine clinic, Thomas Russo, MD, an infectious disease expert at the University of Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, tells SELF. Make sure you alert your health care provider via phone or email if you have or suspect you have been exposed to monkeypox before you arrive at the appointment; that way, your provider can take precautions to try to keep patients and staff protected during your visit.A health care professional can also help you with next steps if you suspect you’ve been exposed to monkeypox or potentially have monkeypox symptoms and don’t know what to do. If you have questions about whether you should get the Jynneos vaccine—or how the vaccine works or its benefits—reach out to a primary care doctor if you have one or your local health department; from there, speaking to an expert can help you make the best decision for your health.Related:

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