Maggie ONeill M.F.A.

Constance Wu Shared How a Friend Saved Her Life During a Mental Health Crisis

Constance Wu Shared How a Friend Saved Her Life During a Mental Health Crisis

Constance Wu has talked about how she found the care she needed after a suicide attempt in two interviews this week, on Good Morning America and Red Table Talk. The Crazy Rich Asians actor also spoke about returning to social media after a three-year break, experiencing sexual harassment on the set of Fresh Off the Boat, and mental health awareness within the Asian American community.Wu, 40, said her mental health started spiraling after she tweeted disappointment that Fresh Off the Boat had been renewed for another season in 2019. At the time, Wu clarified that she wasn’t upset that the show would continue filming; instead, her disappointment stemmed from the fact that by working on another season of the show, she would have to give up a different project she was excited about. Even still, the online backlash was intense.“There was a huge pile on, and I was essentially canceled for coming off as ungrateful,” Wu told GMA. “And the most painful thing of all was it was really the Asian American community that either ostracized or avoided me the most.” The judgment went beyond her tweets, Wu said, explaining that people called her a “diva” for not wanting to do the show following the 2018 blockbuster Crazy Rich Asians: “I was canceled for not being the Asian people wanted me to be, ungrateful, bratty, whatever,” she said.Wu told Red Table Talk that she tried to kill herself after reading DMs sent to her by another Asian American actor who criticized her tweets. Fortunately, a friend who was checking in on her at the time saved her life by taking her straight to a psychiatric emergency room. “They checked me in, and I slept the night on a cot in the waiting room in the psychiatric ER in New York City under observation. And then there were two counselors the next morning who talked to me,” Wu said. “Then I had to be in therapy with a psychiatrist and a psychologist every day for a while.” Wu told GMA that she also started a medication that helped, though it took some time to determine what worked for her.When asked what the healing process was like, Wu said, “I needed it. I was unsafe at that point. I was in a mental place of just beating myself up.” She added the toll that being “canceled” took caused her a lot of pain: “So much shame…and feeling like I’d ruined everything for everyone.”Wu also said she had stayed silent about being sexually harassed while filming Fresh Off the Boat because she wanted to protect a show that was important to her community: “My abuser on the show was an Asian American man, a producer, and it was really a conflict for me because I didn’t want to stain the reputation of the one show Asian Americans had to represent themselves.” She said the response she got after tweeting her frustration about the show’s renewal is among the reasons she doesn’t want to out her abuser now: “Am I afraid of backlash? Of course.”

Here’s Why Selma Blair Was Blindfolded During Her ‘DWTS’ Performance This Week

Here’s Why Selma Blair Was Blindfolded During Her ‘DWTS’ Performance This Week

Selma Blair danced blindfolded to “For Your Eyes Only” by Sheena Easton on this week’s episode of Dancing With the Stars, and she says the “challenge” was actually “comforting”—a “spiritual, emotional boot camp.” Her partner, Sasha Farber, who guided her through the performance, thought of the idea after he noticed Blair tends to close her eyes while rehearsing.“Dance is a feeling,” Farber said. He noticed that when Blair wanted to feel comfortable, she would “close her eyes a lot when she would feel a disconnection from her brain into her body.”That’s where the blindfold came in. “I figured, let’s give this a go. Let’s blindfold her for the whole dance and see…Take her vision away so we would enhance the feel of the message from the brain,” Farber said, per Entertainment Tonight.“Sasha is never far from me,” Blair noted. “But it was a way to not have too much sensory overload in my head, because it’s exciting and there’s so much going on and people moving, so it was a way to buffer it.”Blair, who has been open about living with multiple sclerosis since her diagnosis in 2018, said she often does this even while completing day-to-day tasks. “I do find that I shut my eyes and it makes me center a lot more. So I kinda calm down,” the 50-year-old actor said. “I was doing it before in life, just the way I would approach things would really raise my nervous system. I can get really quickly kinda frantic because I get overwhelmed, or maybe that’s just my personality or sort of attention span with some things.”Blair also shared this week that she often passes out, and that she recently fainted before a rehearsal. Farber said he told her to take the day off but that she wanted to continue practicing. “The thing is, I pass out a lot,” Blair told Entertainment Tonight. “It’s part of the reason I have Scout [her service dog], and it doesn’t mean I lose consciousness [or] it’s a whole ambulance experience. It’s something that I lose my vision, gravity pulls me down, and I’m very disoriented and gone for a spell.” Earlier in the season, she also said she worried her body would involuntarily freeze during a performance.Since joining DWTS, though, Blair has talked about how much the opportunity has meant to her as an advocate for people with disabilities. “I hoped that by doing this show, I could show people with disabilities the joy that can be found in ways you never expected,” she said in an interview from the September 19 episode.In an interview after Monday night’s routine, Blair spoke about how the blindfold made her feel connected to her late mother, to whom she dedicated her performance. She said even though she “can’t see her,” she felt her presence, adding that “the blindfold was a double meaning to me.”Related:

Check Your Fridge, Friends: 25 Brands of Cheese Were Just Recalled

Check Your Fridge, Friends: 25 Brands of Cheese Were Just Recalled

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a food safety alert after two kinds of cheese—brie and camembert—were linked to a listeria outbreak in late September. So far, six illnesses and five hospitalizations have been reported in at least six states across the country, including California, Texas, Michigan, Georgia, New Jersey, and Massachusetts.The cheeses, made by Old Europe Cheese, Inc., were sold at various grocers, including Albertsons, Giant Foods, Lidl, Stop & Shop, Whole Foods, and “many more,” the CDC notes. They were sold under the following brand names: Black Bear, Block & Barrel, Charmant, Cobblestone, Culinary Tour, Fredericks, Fresh Thyme, Glenview Farms, Good & Gather, Heinen’s, Joan of Arc, La Bonne Vie, Lidl, Life in Provence, Market 32, Matrie’d, Metropolitan, Prestige, Primo Taglio, Red Apple Cheese, Reny Picot, St. Randeaux, St. Rocco, Taste of Inspiration, and Trader Joe’s.The recalled products each have a sell-by date from September 28 to December 14. You can check the packaging details (including the universal product codes) of the affected products here.Listeria causes about 1,600 infections (known as listeriosis) in the US each year, per the CDC. People are usually exposed to the bacteria after eating contaminated food, and the flu-like illness it causes can be serious for newborns, pregnant people, older people, and immunocompromised people.If you suspect you have the recalled cheese in your home, you should definitely toss it. This isn’t the time to skimp on cleaning your kitchen afterward, either. According to the Food and Drug Administration’s statement on the recall, you should thoroughly clean and sanitize anything the cheese may have come in contact with (such as cutting boards, food storage containers, or countertops) to reduce your risk of getting sick.If you had the recalled cheese in your home and you start noticing signs of illness, like fever, fatigue, body aches, vomiting, or diarrhea, you should touch base with a doctor to be on the safe side, if you can. In certain cases, antibiotics are recommended to treat listeriosis.The bottom line: If you have cheese in your fridge, it doesn’t hurt to check it out and make sure you’re in the clear.Related:

Here’s Why Katie Couric Says Her Breast Cancer Diagnosis Is a ‘Teachable Moment’

Here’s Why Katie Couric Says Her Breast Cancer Diagnosis Is a ‘Teachable Moment’

She suddenly had flashbacks to the moments she’d been told about family members’ cancer diagnoses, including her first husband, Jay Monahan, who died in 1998 at the age of 42. “The heart-stopping, suspended animation feeling I remember all too well came flooding back,” Couric wrote. “Jay’s colon cancer diagnosis at 41 and the terrifying, gutting nine months that followed. My sister Emily’s pancreatic cancer, which would later kill her at 54, just as her political career was really taking off. My mother-in-law Carol’s ovarian cancer, which she was fighting as she buried her son, a year and nine months before she herself was laid to rest.”Couric waited to tell her two daughters about the diagnosis until she had a better understanding of her illness and prognosis. “Finally, four days after I was diagnosed, I FaceTimed each of them,” she wrote. “Their faces froze in disbelief. Then shock…They’d already lost one parent. The idea of losing another was unfathomable.”Fortunately, Couric was told that her tumor was “highly treatable.” A lumpectomy—during which cancer or other abnormal tissue is removed from the breast—was scheduled; Couric’s medical team also recommended radiation and medication. Following the procedure, Couric received some good news: “The pathology came back a few weeks later. Thankfully, my lymph nodes were clean…I’d later learn my Oncotype—which measures the likelihood of your cancer returning—was 19, considered low enough to forgo chemotherapy.”She started radiation on September 7, just under three months after her diagnosis. Her gratitude for the medical care and support she received eventually grew into frustration, though. “Throughout the process, I kept thinking about…How lucky I was to have access to such incredible care, since so many people don’t…It made me feel grateful and guilty—and angry that there’s a de facto caste system when it comes to health care in America.”Couric said she also grew increasingly angry that screenings for people with dense breasts—like the ultrasound that alerted Couric’s doctor to her tumor—are frequently out of reach. “Far too many women are not benefiting from a technology that will allow their breast cancer to be diagnosed early, when it’s most treatable.”Ultimately, Couric hopes that sharing her cancer story serves as a crucial reminder: to advocate for your health, schedule preventive screenings if you have access to them, and ask questions if you’re unsure of what’s recommended for you. “Please get your annual mammogram,” she wrote. “I was six months late this time. I shudder to think what might have happened if I had put it off longer. But just as importantly, please find out if you need additional screening.”Related:

Here’s How Long You Can Expect the Flu to Last

Here’s How Long You Can Expect the Flu to Last

Cold and flu season may be nastier than usual this year, experts say. Beyond getting your flu shot, it doesn’t hurt to brush up on the basics of influenza so you know what to expect if you do get sick this year.One thought that might come up if you start to feel really crummy (and test negative for COVID): How long does the flu last?Unfortunately, there’s no one-size-fits-all answer, Neha Vyas, MD, a family medicine physician at the Cleveland Clinic, tells SELF. The flu can hit you like a ton of bricks, but the duration of this feeling largely depends on your personal health (and how you take care of yourself when you start to feel sick).Before we jump into the specifics, let us remind you again: Please try to get your flu shot and your updated COVID booster by the end of October, both of which can help protect you and vulnerable people around you. “The more people who get the vaccine, the more the risk goes down in that community,” Dr. Vyas explains. “It’ll protect people.”That said, if you do come down with the flu, you can expect to be out of commission for at least a few days. Here’s what you should know as we settle into the colder months.How long does the flu last for most people?If you’re under the age of 65 and generally healthy, you can probably expect the worst of your flu symptoms—which can include fever or chills, cough, sore throat, a runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headaches, and heavy fatigue—to last between three to seven days, Dr. Vyas says. For adults who got their flu shot, it’ll likely take closer to three days for symptoms to start easing up; for unvaccinated people, it might take longer.That said, it’s not uncommon to feel exhausted for a while or end up with a lingering cough, so it can take up to two weeks to really start feeling like yourself again, per Dr. Vyas. Symptoms may be stubborn for anyone but can be especially persistent for people who fall into a high-risk group, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).The flu may be more severe or last longer for children, older adults, pregnant people, and people who have underlying conditions that may impact their immunity or respiratory health, such as diabetes, heart disease, or asthma, among others.Can you make your flu symptoms go away faster?Wouldn’t that be lovely? Sorry to break the bad news, but there’s no quick or easy way to recover from the flu. While antiviral drugs are available for people who face a higher risk of complications, like pneumonia, these medications don’t make sense for everyone to take, Dr. Vyas says. They also require a prescription, so you’ll want to talk to your doctor about whether this is an option for you.If you’re otherwise generally healthy, you’ll basically have to wait on your body to do its job and recover on its own—so expect to ease into some downtime. You can actually drag out your symptoms by trying to push through the illness, Dr. Vyas says. “You need to take a rest to recover,” she explains.This means getting plenty of sleep, drinking lots of fluids (soup counts!), avoiding alcohol, and taking over-the-counter cold and flu meds if you’re feeling extra miserable, Dr. Vyas says. Also, this is the time to stay home and away from other people—especially people who are high-risk like a grandparent or baby cousin. “We generally don’t recommend people to go back to work until they’ve been fever-free for 24 hours,” Dr. Vyas explains.We get it: Nobody wants to be stuck in bed for days—but that’s usually the best-case scenario if you catch this bug. So, to keep you and your loved ones safe, make sure you’re washing your hands frequently (and keeping unwashed hands away from your face); disinfect high-touch surfaces in your home often; cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze; consider wearing a face mask in crowded public spaces; and google “flu shot near me” to schedule your appointment if you haven’t already.Related:

‘Spider-Man’ Star Laura Harrier Wants to Destigmatize Therapy in the Black Community

‘Spider-Man’ Star Laura Harrier Wants to Destigmatize Therapy in the Black Community

Laura Harrier covered a lot of ground in a recent interview with Cosmopolitan. She shared what her new home looks like (think 1920s Paris), her go-to reality TV show (90 Day Fiancé), and details about her friendship with Spider-Man: Homecoming costar Zendaya. But the 32-year-old actor also spoke candidly about how she prioritizes her mental health. When asked how she takes care of herself, Harrier said therapy gave her the tools she needed to feel good.“I really am a big advocate for therapy and for mental health care, especially in the Black community,” Harrier said. “That’s something that’s really improved my life and really helped me in significant ways, especially when dealing with my anxiety and panic attacks.”Harrier added that mental health needs to be prioritized just as much as physical health—and destigmatizing therapy can play a big role in that. “There’s been such a long history of ignoring mental health problems, of saying, ‘Oh, just suck it up,’ or, ‘I’m a strong Black woman. That doesn’t happen to me,’” she said, noting that she believes these tropes have been “taught over generations” and fueled by trauma. That’s why Harrier is passionate about working with the Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective (BEAM), which aims to help marginalized communities access the mental health care they need by connecting them with therapists and other healing resources.As for her personal well-being, Harrier said she turns to many tools outside of therapy. “I try to meditate. I can’t say that I’m the best with my track record of doing it every day, but I try to at least do some deep breathing,” she said. “I noticed I literally forget to breathe, which sounds wild, but sometimes I’m like, ‘Wait, I haven’t taken a real breath all day,’ and just taking 30 seconds to sit and do deep belly breathing is a game changer.”She also doesn’t subscribe to the idea that you have to do a daily workout class to stay healthy; instead, she determines what she needs at a given moment (which isn’t *always* an intense meditation session) and prioritizes that.“I think it’s so common to talk only about self-care as mediation, yoga, and working out, which are all important, but sometimes self-care is having a glass of wine with your best friend and laughing and watching shitty reality TV,” Harrier said. “Sometimes that’s the self-care that you need.”Harrier also shared her thoughts on issues like colorism in Hollywood (noting that she got called “Zendaya” frequently on the Spider-Man set) and the crucial need for abortion access in America—and no, she’s not worried about any potential backlash about speaking up. “I’m coming at these topics as Laura, as a woman of reproductive age who’s affected by Roe v. Wade. I’m affected by Black Lives Matter issues because I’m a Black person in America, because that’s my family, because that’s my little brother walking down the street that I worry about,” she said. “It’s not because of my job that I care about these issues. It’s because of my humanity that I do.”Related:

Selma Blair Worried Her Body Would Freeze During Her First DWTS Performance

Selma Blair Worried Her Body Would Freeze During Her First DWTS Performance

Selma Blair shared what her first performance on Dancing with the Stars really felt like in a new interview with Access Hollywood. “It brought tears to me afterwards,” the 50-year-old actor said as she stood next to her 11-year-old son, Arthur, who mentioned that he’s “really proud” of his mom.Blair, who has been open about living with multiple sclerosis (MS) since her diagnosis in 2018, thanked her dance partner, Sasha Farber, for being so supportive during rehearsals and on-stage. “I’ve never even danced with anyone before…. This was my first dance, and to have Sasha hold me in frame and teach me to have a little better control and calm my breathing down—it meant everything,” she said. “It was beautiful.”Naturally, she got a bit nervous in the lead-up to the show’s September 19 premiere and worried that her body would involuntarily pause during the dance. “I felt the adrenaline, and when I feel the adrenaline some of my body freezes,” she said. “In the dress rehearsal I thought, Oh God, I hope I can find it.” And she did: Her brilliant performance was met by praise (and plenty of tears) from the judges. This included Carrie Ann Inaba, who was visibly emotional as she spoke about her own experience of being a part of the “invisible illness community.”Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological condition that affects the central nervous system. As the disease progresses, it can block messages the brain tries to send to the rest of the body. This can lead to wide-ranging, potentially disabling symptoms, including chronic pain, vision problems, muscle weakness, trouble with coordination and balance, numbness and tingling, memory issues, and partial paralysis, among many others. As SELF previously reported, Blair said she often deals with spasticity and dystonia—two potential side effects of multiple sclerosis that affect the muscles—when trying new things, but that she was determined to work through them.In an interview from Monday night’s episode, Blair talked about what it means to be a contestant on DWTS as a person who lives with MS. “I hoped that by doing this show, I could show people with disabilities the joy that can be found in ways you never expected,” she said.Ultimately, her presence on the show offers much-needed representation and inspiration: “The gratitude I feel, if I could ever help someone try something new, especially someone that’s chronically ill and has differences. [That’s what] tonight and the past few weeks have been all about.”Related:

Schools Warn Students About ‘Rainbow’ Fentanyl, Which Literally Looks Like Candy

Schools Warn Students About ‘Rainbow’ Fentanyl, Which Literally Looks Like Candy

Be aware that fentanyl—a synthetic opioid up to 100 times more potent than morphine—may be hiding in plain sight. “Rainbow” fentanyl, which looks a lot like candy, has been seized in multiple states, according to a statement from the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). The pills are being manufactured in bright colors in what the agency calls an “alarming emerging trend.”Schools across the country, including Pennsylvania State University and some school districts in Florida, are now warning students and their families about the risks of rainbow fentanyl. Law enforcement found the pills in at least 18 states in August alone. “Rainbow fentanyl—fentanyl pills and powder that come in a variety of bright colors, shapes, and sizes—is a deliberate effort by drug traffickers to drive addiction amongst kids and young adults,” a DEA representative said in the statement.In addition to pills, rainbow fentanyl may be sold as powder or blocks that resemble sidewalk chalk, per the statement; there have been rumors that some colors of the drug are more potent than others, but the DEA’s lab testing suggests that’s not the case. Fentanyl can also be disguised as fake prescription pills, according to the US Department of Justice. In May, the deaths of two Ohio State University students prompted the school to warn of fentanyl-laced Adderall, as SELF previously reported.People can overdose after ingesting incredibly small amounts of this stuff, which is one reason why fentanyl—especially when it’s masked to look like something else—is currently the deadliest drug in the US. Just 2 grams of fentanyl, which is about 10 to 15 grains of table salt, can be deadly. Because of this, it’s crucial to recognize the symptoms of an overdose, which can include skin that looks pale or feels clammy; limp muscles; purple or blue-ish fingernails or lips; vomiting or gurgling noises; an inability to wake or speak; and a slow heartbeat or trouble breathing. If someone you know has any of these symptoms, it’s crucial to call 911 and seek help immediately.Unfortunately, experts say the country is not doing enough to fight the opioid epidemic, which is, in turn, driving up fentanyl-related health risks. “The overdose crisis has been going on for two decades and seems to be intensifying,” Sheila Vakharia, PhD, deputy director of the department of research and academic engagement at the Drug Policy Alliance, previously told SELF.That’s why everyone—especially parents of young adults, college students, and people who have opioid use disorder—needs to be aware of rainbow fentanyl right now. There’s no way to tell what, exactly, is in a drug that has not been recommended to you by a health care provider. The director of Penn State’s Health Promotion and Wellness program emphasized this in the university’s recent warning to students: “Unless a drug is prescribed by a licensed medical professional and dispensed by a legitimate pharmacy, you can’t know if it’s fake or legitimate.”If you believe you’ve come across any form of fentanyl, do not handle it and call 911 immediately, the DEA said in its statement: “Every color, shape, and size of fentanyl should be considered extremely dangerous.”Related:

Some Colgate Products Have Been Recalled After Being Improperly Stored

Some Colgate Products Have Been Recalled After Being Improperly Stored

Six different Colgate products sold at Family Dollar stores are being voluntarily recalled because they weren’t stored properly, according to a statement from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The products were shipped to stores in 11 states from May 1 to June 21 this year. No illnesses related to the recalled products have been reported yet.The following Colgate products were affected:Colgate Optic White Stain Prevention Toothpaste, 2.1 ouncesColgate Optic White Charcoal Toothpaste, 4.2 ouncesColgate Optic White High Impact Toothpaste, 3 ouncesColgate Optic White Toothpaste Icy Fresh, 3.2 ouncesColgate Optic White Stain Fighter Toothpaste Clean Mint, 4.2 ouncesColgate Optic White Mouthwash, 16 fluid ouncesThe products were sold at Family Dollar stores in the following states:ArizonaCaliforniaGeorgiaIdahoIndianaMontanaNew MexicoNevadaOregonTexasUtahEmployees at the affected Family Dollar stores have been notified and asked to isolate and remove the recalled products from shelves immediately. If you purchased one of the recalled items, you can return it to the Family Dollar where you bought it and you don’t need the receipt to do so, the FDA statement said. Given that employees are being asked to separate the recalled products and dispose of them, you may want to put the product in some kind of container (like a bag) before disposing of it or returning it to the store.If you purchased one of the recalled products and you or a loved one starts to experience any unusual or surprising health problems after it’s been used, you should see a doctor, the statement said. The FDA didn’t list specific symptoms to be on the lookout for.Any reactions to the recalled product can be reported to the FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program, which tracks health issues caused by potentially unsafe or recalled products. Anyone with questions about the recall can also call Family Dollar’s customer service line (844-636-7687) for more information.Related:

‘Skin Cycling’ Is the Buzzy TikTok Trend That Dermatologists Actually Like

‘Skin Cycling’ Is the Buzzy TikTok Trend That Dermatologists Actually Like

Again, you’ll want to cleanse your face first and then make sure it’s 100% dry—not even a little damp—before applying the retinoid, Dr. Bowe says. (Damp skin boosts the penetration of the retinoid, which could potentially lead to more irritation for some people.) A pea-sized amount of product for your entire face is plenty.If you haven’t used a retinoid before, apply a light layer of a simple moisturizer to sensitive areas (under the eyes, around the corners of the mouth, at the base of your nostrils, and on the neck) first. Then apply your retinoid, and finish with another layer of moisturizer on top. This “sandwich” technique creates a protective buffer to help reduce things like peeling and dryness as your skin builds up some tolerance. (Trust the process and be consistent, the side effects should level out over time.)Nights 3 and 4Okay, your skin has been hard at work. Now you should ease into recovery nights. You can simply cleanse your face and apply any hydrating serums or moisturizers that don’t include active ingredients like the ones mentioned above—and that’s it! Look for fragrance-free products that contain skin-repairing add-ins like hyaluronic acid, glycerin, and ceramides. In this case, it’s okay if your skin is a bit damp because you want to lock that water in. “Hold off on the exfoliating acids and retinoids and give your skin a chance to recover,” Dr. Bowe says.TikTok contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.What are the benefits of skin cycling?Skin cycling can be really effective because it gives your face a chance to heal in between treatments. “Exfoliating serums and retinoids are powerful, highly effective products that I use in my skin care routine and recommend to my patients,” Dr. Bowe explains. “However, they can be very irritating for many people if used too frequently.” Essentially, applying too much too often can lead to sensitive, tight, or dry skin, she explains; people with darker skin tones, in particular, have a higher risk of hyperpigmentation when overusing these products.So, skin cycling may help you reap the benefits of these (often pricey) products with a lower risk of annoying side effects. “When it comes to skin care, less is more,” Joshua Zeichner, MD, an associate professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City and a co-founder of JORI Skincare, tells SELF. You can think of your skin care routine almost like your fitness routine. “This is similar to the idea of working out different muscle groups in your weekly gym session,” Dr. Zeichner explains. “Giving your skin ‘work days’ and ‘rest days’ allows for improvements without causing the potential irritation or skin barrier damage you may experience from overdoing your routine every day.”Also worth noting: You don’t have to reinvent the wheel to start skin cycling, and it’s generally safe—even for those of us who have trust issues because one too many serums did major damage. “This is an easy routine to use, and it is particularly useful in people who are sensitive and can’t tolerate harsh [ingredients] on a daily basis,” Dr. Zeichner says.Are there any potential downsides to skin cycling?Anyone can try skin cycling, but your routine may need to be tailored to your personal needs over time, Dr. Bowe says. “The beauty of skin cycling is that you can adjust your cycling schedule to meet your skin where it is,” she explains. “If you are experiencing sensitivity and irritation, you can increase your recovery nights. If you are seasoned and well-adjusted to your retinoid and want to dial up, you can omit one recovery night for a three-night cycle.” Basically, it’s crucial to listen to your skin. If it’s inflamed, rough, and itchy, it’s probably time to give it a break and go back to the basics: gentle cleanser, moisturizer, and SPF. (Please, please don’t forget your sunscreen in the morning. It helps protect your skin from further damage as your exfoliants and retinoids do their thing.)People with certain skin conditions—including severe acne, rosacea, eczema, or psoriasis—and people who use prescription medications for their skin should always check in with their dermatologist before trying out a new routine. Your doctor will be able to personalize the skin cycling regimen to best suit your complexion, Dr. Bowe says.Even if you don’t have any known persistent skin issues, it’s still worth checking in with a dermatologist, if you can, if something feels off when you start skin cycling, Dr. Bowe says. For instance, some people with oily skin may need a stronger exfoliant on night one, and your dermatologist should be able to help with this and recommend a solid product. Fortunately, there’s almost always a workaround. “Sensitive skin can be a diva,” Dr. Bowe says, but “it tends to respond incredibly well to our classic four-night routine.”Related:

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