Colleen Stinchcombe

Some Rapid Tests May Not Detect Omicron Effectively, Dr. Fauci Says

Some Rapid Tests May Not Detect Omicron Effectively, Dr. Fauci Says

Some rapid antigen tests may not be able to detect the omicron COVID-19 variant effectively enough, according to Anthony Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “​​We’re getting preliminary information that not all of the [rapid] diagnostic tests will be accurate with omicron,” Dr. Fauci said in a virtual conversation with the Chamber of Commerce Foundation on Thursday.That’s a problem, as rapid tests have been a significant—though imperfect—tool for detecting the SARS-CoV-2 virus. “Some, and many of the commonly used ones, appear to pick up and detect omicron quite well,” Dr. Fauci said. “We’re in the process of doing large screening to determine which of these antigen point-of-care rapid tests still maintain their accuracy of diagnosis. But clearly, there are some that do. We’re trying to find out those that don’t reflect an accurate result. And if we do, make sure that those tests are not used to diagnose omicron.”Even at their best, rapid antigen tests haven’t been as accurate as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, which are the gold standard for diagnosing COVID-19, as SELF has reported. According to a Cochrane review of 64 studies and more than 24,000 testing samples, rapid antigen tests managed to detect COVID-19 in 72% of symptomatic COVID-19 cases pre-omicron. In positive people without symptoms, they were only about 58% accurate. On the other hand, PCR tests are generally estimated to be around 98% accurate at detecting COVID-19 infections when used correctly. But rapid tests can come back in as little as 15 minutes at home, where PCR tests must be sent to a lab and take a few hours at minimum for results—and often take days.Another major blow is that omicron has significantly reduced the effectiveness of monoclonal antibodies, one of few COVID-19 treatments. Monoclonal antibodies are lab-made antibodies delivered intravenously to high-risk people who have tested positive for COVID-19 or been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, per the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “When you look at the rather large number of mutations on the omicron variant, it is predictive and has shown in reality to evade certain immune parameters, such as monoclonal antibodies, many of which are no longer effective against this virus,” Dr. Fauci said.The omicron variant has over 50 mutations from the original virus, including more than 30 on its spike protein, which helps the virus enter our cells, as SELF has explained. Many antibodies we generate from vaccination and infection (and most of the lab-made monoclonal antibodies) target these spike proteins—so when they change, it can make immunity and antibody treatments less effective.So, what does all of this mean if you were hoping rapid tests could be a core part of your protection strategy during holiday travel or gatherings? According to public health experts, they still can be. “Folks will travel, see family/friends this holiday season,” Ashish K. Jha, M.D., MPH, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, wrote on Twitter. “Use of rapid tests can make things safer.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) specifically recommends considering rapid testing before getting together indoors with anyone you don’t live with. But that shouldn’t be the only precaution you take. “Ugh. Omicron is bad news. Get vaccinated if you haven’t been yet. Get boosted if you’re eligible. Wear masks. Avoid crowds. Ventilate if you can. Rapid test if available. Stay home if you don’t feel well,” Angela Rasmussen, Ph.D., virologist at Georgetown University Center for Global Health Science and Security, wrote on Twitter. And, importantly, she ended with a reminder that individual and community health very much go hand in hand during this pandemic: “Advocate for global vaccine equity. We have the tools. We must use them.”Related:

Charlie Puth Has Breakthrough COVID-19—Here’s How He’s Feeling

Charlie Puth Has Breakthrough COVID-19—Here’s How He’s Feeling

Singer Charlie Puth has announced that he’s tested positive for COVID-19. The singer, who had shared that he was fully vaccinated back in May, isn’t feeling great physically—though he does at least believe he’s now on the mend. “I’m not feeling amazing but I think the worst is behind me,” Puth, 30, wrote on Twitter. “I write you this update, feeling like complete ass, in hopes that you will be safe and careful this holiday season.”Twitter contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.Puth is one of several celebrities to test positive for the virus recently—and many are even on their second bout of the illness. Earlier this week, Doja Cat had to pull out of several performances after testing positive for COVID-19 for a second time. In November, Khloé Kardashian got the virus a second time despite being fully vaccinated, as did Dancing With the Stars competitor and Peloton trainer Cody Rigsby in October.The most common symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, chills, cough, fatigue, muscle and body aches, headache, sore throat, congestion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, shortness of breath, and loss of taste and smell, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In severe cases, people can experience difficulty breathing, chest pain, loss of color to the lips, inability to wake or stay awake, and confusion—all signs to seek immediate emergency attention.It’s not clear which variant Puth has. As SELF previously reported, delta remains the dominant variant in the U.S. for the time being, according to comments by CDC director Rochelle Walensky, M.D., MPH. But the omicron variant is spreading rapidly in many areas, and public health experts are predicting yet another surge of infections.Experts have also learned that the two-dose mRNA vaccines, such as Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, reportedly have a significantly reduced ability to protect against omicron infection. According to preliminary data, they offer around 33% protection against infection with this variant. However, mRNA vaccines seem to still be much more effective (around 70%) against severe illness and death, based on what we know so far—and a booster shot might improve protection against symptomatic infection to about 75%. (At press time, Puth hadn’t publicly shared whether he’d received a booster shot.)It’s definitely disheartening to see that the latest worrisome variant is spreading like wildfire and able to evade immunity to a concerning extent. All we can do is make sure to protect ourselves—and each other—from omicron as much as possible, and that still includes getting vaccinated and boosted.Related:

There’s a Nationwide Pepperoni Recall for Toxin-Producing Bacteria

There’s a Nationwide Pepperoni Recall for Toxin-Producing Bacteria

There’s yet another big pepperoni recall making the news. Smithfield Packaged Meats Corp., which brands itself as Margherita Meats, is recalling 10,990 pounds of ready-to-eat pepperoni over concerns it may contain Bacillus cereus bacteria.The pepperoni in question is the 8-oz package of ready-to-eat unsliced pepperoni labeled Margherita Pepperoni. Check the label for the lot code P1931C and a “use by date” of 12-14-2021. USDA Food and Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has a handy photo of the label—and where these numbers are located—here. The products were shipped to stores all across the U.S., so the recall is nationwide.The issue was discovered when the Department of Defense conducted routine testing, according to FSIS. Bacillus cereus is common bacteria in the environment that creates two different toxins. One (called an emetic toxin) can result in diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps that can hit as soon as an hour after eating, while the other (an enterotoxin) typically leads to diarrhea several hours later that lasts for a full day. Food poisoning is unpleasant for everyone but can be serious for people with compromised immune systems, according to FSIS.Luckily, FSIS says no one has reported getting sick from the products yet, but the agency is concerned people may have the pepperoni sitting in their pantries or refrigerators. If that’s the case for you, throw it away or return it to the place of purchase for a refund.If you do find yourself sick after eating the pepperoni (or any other potentially contaminated food), know that most people with food poisoning will feel better on their own within a few days, according to the Mayo Clinic, which has some helpful tips for easing foodborne illness symptoms, including:Try to stay as hydrated as possible even when it’s hard to keep anything down. Sucking on ice chips or taking smaller sips of water than usual may be helpful.Until symptoms subside, avoid items like dairy, caffeine, alcohol, nicotine, and very fatty or spicy foods.When you’re able to start eating again, stick to easy-to-digest options that don’t have a ton of flavor, like toast, bananas, and rice.If your foodborne illness lasts longer than a couple of days or is particularly intense, you may need treatment like over-the-counter meds or antibiotics. In the most severe cases of foodborne illness, people might need to be hospitalized if they can’t stay hydrated.Smithfield isn’t the only company dealing with a pepperoni recall lately (along with other kinds). As SELF previously reported, Alexander & Hornung, a subsidiary of Perdue Premium Meat Company, had to recall more than 234,000 pounds of ham and pepperoni products earlier this month due to listeria concerns. And DiGiorno recalled their Pepperoni Crispy Pan Crust back in September after the boxes were mislabeled, potentially missing major allergens like soy protein.Related:

There’s a New Warning About the Omicron Variant You Need to Hear

There’s a New Warning About the Omicron Variant You Need to Hear

The omicron variant of COVID-19 appears to be more transmissible than any variant so far, including delta. “Omicron is spreading at a rate we have not seen with any previous variant,” Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, M.D., director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), said on Tuesday in a media briefing. Anthony Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, agrees. “Looking at what’s going on in South Africa, which has the most data, it looks like that its doubling time is clearly less and shorter, which means it transmits more rapidly than delta and very likely other variants,” he told CBC earlier this week.For weeks, experts have been trying to figure out whether omicron spreads more rapidly than previous variants, whether it can evade immune protection brought on by vaccines, and whether the variant makes people sicker than previous iterations of the virus. On Wednesday, during a White House COVID-19 update, Dr. Fauci said that vaccine protection against infection has definitely diminished.Dr. Fauci cited results from a preliminary analysis of data from South Africa showing that protection against omicron infection with two-dose vaccines like Moderna and Pfizer has dropped to 33%. “Obviously, this is significantly down, but there is the maintaining of a degree of protection against hospitalization,” Dr. Fauci said. (The vaccine was still 70% effective against hospitalization from omicron based on the data, which has not yet been peer-reviewed.) And, importantly, boosters may increase protection against symptomatic COVID-19 from omicron to about 75%, Dr. Fauci said. “At this point, there is no need for a variant-specific booster,” Dr. Fauci said.The least clear aspect right now is whether omicron is less severe than previous variants, although so far the answer seems hopeful. “It looks like it might be that the level of severity is less with omicron than it is with delta,” Dr. Fauci told CBC, based on information from South Africa and the U.K. “So hopefully that holds true as we get more data.”However, the WHO has cautioned against relying too much on a mild presentation of the virus. “Even if omicron does cause less severe disease, the sheer number of cases could once again overwhelm unprepared health systems,” Dr. Ghebreyesus said at the Tuesday news briefing. “Surely, we have learned by now that we underestimate this virus at our peril.”Nearly 80 countries have reported cases of the omicron coronavirus variant to date—but it’s probably in most countries, according to the WHO. It’s already the dominant variant in South Africa, where scientists first discovered omicron, and it’s expected to be the dominant variant in London within days, according to the U.K.’s health secretary.The omicron variant first sparked concerns back in November because it has over 50 mutations from the original SARS-CoV-2 virus, including at least 30 on its spike proteins, which help the virus enter the body’s cells, as SELF previously explained. When we create antibodies due to vaccination or prior infection, many of them are specifically targeted at the spike proteins—which means that if the spike proteins change, as they have with omicron, the virus may be better at evading our immune systems.

Billie Eilish on Starting to Watch Porn at 11 Years Old: ‘It Really Destroyed My Brain'

Billie Eilish on Starting to Watch Porn at 11 Years Old: ‘It Really Destroyed My Brain'

Much of the above research centers on adults. But what about when it comes to porn consumption specifically in teenagers, or kids even younger than that, as Eilish was when she first started watching pornography?There isn’t a ton of concrete data about the average age people are first exposed to porn, and studying the effects of porn on kids and adolescents can be understandably tricky territory. But what research has been done commonly estimates that boys tend to first be exposed to porn when they’re around 11 to 13 and girls when they’re around 13 to 17. Those numbers may be trending down since the internet’s evolution is making it increasingly easier to find pornography whether or not you’re looking for it. And since it’s just the average, it means there are people who first got exposed at ages higher or lower than that, like Eilish.In any case, some research has found a potential association between boys first seeing porn at a younger age and being more likely to want power over women as men. Other research has found a possible association between girls being younger when they first see porn and having a higher likelihood of being sexually abused. Some research has even found that the younger a person is when they first see violent porn, no matter their sex, the more likely they may be to be either a perpetrator or victim of teen dating violence. But each of these studies has its own limitations, and more broadly, it’s in no way guaranteed that someone is destined for any of these outcomes because they watch porn, even of a violent nature, when they’re young.There’s a whole movement to create ethical and even feminist porn to reduce its potential harms on viewers and those in the actual videos. (And, of course, there’s an accompanying debate over whether it’s possible for porn to ever be ethical and/or feminist.) But traditional porn is much, much more common than any made with these aims, and Eilish is far from the only person who’s had a terrible experience with it.Since porn is clearly here to stay (and for kids to find), some sex educators, psychologists, and public health experts are encouraging porn literacy in adolescent sex education, the APA says. One program, the Start Strong: Building Healthy Teen Relationships initiative at the Boston Public Health Commission, teaches young people about “the history of pornography and obscenity laws, sexual norms, and gendered double standards, and the research on pornography and compulsive use,” according to the APA. (Without showing the participants actual pornography.) It also examines how porn scripts are often unrealistic. But the program isn’t exclusively focused on porn, but rather giving teens tools for healthy relationships and reducing teen dating violence.“I don’t know how you can ignore the fact that pornography really is available and easy to access and that so many teenagers have seen it,” Emily Rothman, Sc.D., a professor of community health sciences at Boston University who helped develop the Start Strong curriculum, told the APA. “To not address it in any way as part of sex education seems like a real oversight.”Like so many other things, watching porn (especially at a young age) won’t be a good or healthy experience for everyone. Some people do just fine with it. Others don’t. If you feel like porn has warped your view of your body, sex life, or anything else in a way you’re really struggling with, that’s a great thing to talk about with a therapist, whether or not they specialize in sex therapy.Related:

Here’s How Much Pfizer's Anti-COVID Pill May Reduce the Risk of Hospitalization and Death

Here’s How Much Pfizer's Anti-COVID Pill May Reduce the Risk of Hospitalization and Death

There’s some potentially good news on the COVID-19 front: Pfizer’s anti-COVID pill, Paxlovid, may be as much as 89% effective at reducing hospitalization and death among high-risk unvaccinated people with the illness, according to a new analysis from the company. And the company said the pill seemed to work against the omicron variant in laboratory studies.Last month, Pfizer released interim data suggesting its oral medication regimen was around 89% effective at this goal compared to a placebo. That number was based on a study of around 1,200 unvaccinated people. The final analysis today included an additional 1,000 people, and nobody in the trial who received the anti-COVID pills died. Twelve people from the placebo group died in the same timeframe.The company also released early data from a second clinical trial that looked at 673 adults who had tested positive for COVID-19 and were either unvaccinated and at standard risk of severe illness or vaccinated with at least one risk factor for severe illness. A little over half (338) received the Pfizer anti-COVID pill and the rest received a placebo. Early results found that the pill reduced hospitalizations by around 70% compared to placebo, and no deaths were reported.“This underscores the treatment candidate’s potential to save the lives of patients around the world,” said Albert Bourla, Pfizer chairman and CEO, in a statement.The company also said that the drug appears effective against the omicron variant in laboratory tests, and they expect it to remain effective. There’s a good reason why. The main concern around variants so far has been about the spike proteins on the virus. That’s because antibodies generated by both vaccination and natural infection rely, at least in part, on defenses built against COVID-19’s spike proteins. When those spike proteins change as new variants emerge, it can make it more difficult for our bodies to recognize and mount an early defense against the virus. The omicron variant’s many mutations to the spike protein are what have sparked significant concern among experts, as SELF previously explained.But the Pfizer drug is meant to work by inhibiting the virus’s ability to break into smaller pieces and replicate itself by dulling an enzyme called protease—not by battling spike proteins. A course of the drug is 30 pills over five days, some of which are Paxlovid and some of which are an antiviral called ritonavir, which helps keep Paxlovid working in the body for longer.The company said they sent their final data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) where it will need to be approved before it becomes available to the public. Pfizer’s chief scientific officer, Mikael Dolsten, said he expects it to be authorized for high-risk patients soon, and that it may not need an FDA advisory panel meeting. “We’re in very advanced regulatory dialogues with both Europe and the U.K., and we have dialogues with most of the major regulatory agencies globally,” Dolsten said in an interview.The Pfizer drug’s effectiveness appears to be a significant improvement over the anti-COVID pill from Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics. The Merck pill, which doesn’t affect protease but instead introduces mutational errors through an enzyme called polymerase, initially showed a 50% reduction in hospitalization and death in high-risk unvaccinated people with mild or moderate COVID-19. After final review, its effectiveness dropped to 30%, and experts had concerns that Merck drug’s intentional mutations could even affect other enzymes in the body. But the FDA voted to recommend the drug at the end of November, though it is still not authorized for patient use.We’ve seen how quickly aspects of this pandemic—including data—have changed as time passes, so even promising results like the ones from Pfizer aren’t necessarily set in stone. (And, of course, they’re not the same as independent analysis from an official third party.) But this news does certainly offer a potential bright spot as the COVID-19 era continues.Related:​​

Sherri Shepherd Shared a Health Update After Her Emergency Surgery This Weekend

Sherri Shepherd Shared a Health Update After Her Emergency Surgery This Weekend

Sherri Shepherd had to miss her spot guest-hosting The Wendy Williams Show on Monday after she had emergency surgery over the weekend. The 54-year-old came down with appendicitis, which was announced on the show by her replacement host, actor Michael Rapaport.”So Sherri was supposed to host today. Unfortunately, she had appendicitis,” he told The Wendy Williams Show audience. “She’s fine. She is fine. She had to go to the hospital last night for some emergency surgery. She’s feeling fine today and she is rested. Get well soon, Sherri. Everybody loves you!”Shepherd also confirmed the surgery on various social media accounts, where she posted a video clip from her hospital bed. “I just had an emergency appendectomy,” she says. “I don’t know where it came from, all of a sudden I was in a great deal of pain. I came in here to get some Metamucil and they said, ‘We gotta take out your appendix right away.’ So they removed my appendix.”The star clearly had her sense of humor still, because she said that the drama of the day was that her wig went missing. “I just found my wig. We started off, I went into surgery with the wig, I came out bald-headed looking like Ludacris,” she said. “But we have found my wig.” She also thanked the staff at NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue for removing her appendix.Twitter contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.She’s expected to return as a guest host today and posted the photo of what would have been her hosting outfit that she decided to change up because her stomach is still swollen. “My stylist is frantically shopping for loose & flowing dresses right now!” she wrote.Instagram contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.The appendix is a finger-like tube attached to the large intestine—it’s a working part of the immune system in children, but stops doing this as an adult, Johns Hopkins Medicine explains. Appendicitis is the inflammation of the appendix caused by a blockage—this can happen due to various viruses or bacteria, trapped stool, or even tumors. Once it’s blocked, it becomes sore and swollen, and then blood flow to the appendix starts to diminish. The appendix can start to die, and holes can start to develop or it can even burst, all of which allows stool, mucus, and infection to get inside the abdomen, leading to a serious infection called peritonitis. Appendicitis is most common in people between the ages of 10 and 30 but can happen at any age, according got the Mayo Clinic.

How Doja Cat's Doing After Testing Positive for COVID-19 Again

How Doja Cat's Doing After Testing Positive for COVID-19 Again

Fans of Doja Cat just got dealt some bad news: The singer and rapper posted on her official Instagram that she’s tested positive for COVID-19 alongside members of her production team. The diagnosis means she’s had to pull out of iHeartRadio’s Jingle Ball Tour.“We recently learned that a few members on my production team have tested positive for COVID-19 and are now on quarantine,” she wrote on Instagram. “For the health and wellbeing of the rest of our crew, we are following all the appropriate safety measurements and necessary precautions, which means I won’t be able to perform at iHeartRadio’s New York Z100 and Boston KISS FM Jingle Ball.”Luckily, it sounds like the entertainer is experiencing a mild case of the illness, but the diagnosis has understandably affected her emotionally. “I’m extremely disappointed…wish I could be there,” she said. “While my spirits are down…I’m doing OK and look forward to recovering and getting back out there as soon as I can!”It’s not the performer’s first bout with the virus. In a July 2020 interview with Capital XTRA, she said she had previously tested positive. “I got COVID … I don’t know how I got it but I got it.” At the time, she faced several days of symptoms. “I’m OK now. It was a four-day symptom freak out, but I’m fine now.”It’s not clear whether Doja Cat has been vaccinated or received a booster. In March 2020, she mocked concern about the pandemic. In an Instagram Live appearance, she said inaccurately of the virus, “It’s a flu!” and that she wasn’t scared of it, downplaying its extreme seriousness and potential lethality.Unfortunately, as is starkly clear at this point, the illness is not a mild experience for everyone. COVID-19 has killed more than 793,000 people in the U.S. since it was first discovered in late 2019, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (The flu, on the other hand, tends to kill between 12,000 and 52,000 people per year, according to the CDC.) Older people and those with certain underlying health conditions such as heart or lung disease or diabetes have among the highest risk for severe complications. And even people who have a mild experience with the illness can end up with months of debilitating symptoms, in a condition known as “long COVID.”According to the CDC, the most common symptoms for COVID-19 are cold and flu-like, such as fever, chills, cough, fatigue, muscle and body aches, headache, sore throat, congestion, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The illness can also cause shortness of breath and loss of taste and smell. In more severe cases, people can experience difficulty breathing, chest pain, confusion, and loss of color in the lips, which are all signs to seek emergency medical attention.One of the best ways to prevent long COVID, severe illness, death, and spreading the virus to others who may have these experiences is to get the COVID-19 vaccine if you haven’t already, according to the CDC, and to get your booster dose if you are at least six months out from your second shot of the Pfizer/Moderna shot or two months out from a Johnson & Johnson vaccine.That’s true even if you’ve previously had COVID-19, like Doja Cat did. As we’re seeing in people like Cody Rigsby and Derek Hough, even fully vaccinated people who have already gotten COVID-19 can get breakthrough cases. New variants, such as the omicron variant, may be even more likely to evade previous immunity—which is why getting vaccinated and boosted is so critical. But those who are unvaccinated or haven’t received boosters are at even greater risk of getting the illness—potentially even more than once.Related:

What Actually Killed Mr. Big: His Peloton Workout or His Lifestyle?

What Actually Killed Mr. Big: His Peloton Workout or His Lifestyle?

Choosing beef without visible fat, trimming fat that you do see, and draining fat from the pan before serving can also help reduce the amount of fat when eating or cooking steak. So it’s possible that Mr. Big was enjoying steak as responsibly as he could, at least some of the time. Plus, early on in the episode, he and Carrie have a little repartee about the type of salmon she’d bought for dinner. It’s a notably omega-3-rich pick that the nutrition and medical fields widely consider anti-inflammatory and protective for the heart, and it was clear based on the conversation that this wasn’t their first time enjoying it together.Alcohol is another tricky subject when it comes to heart health. Some studies suggest moderate alcohol use (two drinks or fewer per day for men, one drink or fewer per day for women) may actually be associated with lower heart disease risk, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. Many potentially positive findings in this arena center on red wine specifically, which Mr. Big (who at one point in the show owned a vineyard in Napa) has been known to enjoy. But the relationship isn’t necessarily causal—for instance, as Johns Hopkins Medicine points out, it’s possible that people who regularly drink red wine may have higher incomes overall, which is tied to increased access to healthy foods. While the jury’s still out in that realm, it is clear that heavy drinking (more than 15 drinks a week for men and more than 8 drinks a week for women, per the CDC) can lead to high blood pressure, heart failure, and stroke.Mr. Big’s weekly cigar habit has even fewer redeeming qualities. According to the CDC, smoking causes 25% of cardiovascular disease deaths. It can raise triglycerides (a type of fat) in your blood, lower your body’s “good” (HDL) cholesterol, make your blood more likely to clot and block blood flow to your heart and brain, damage cells lining the blood vessels, increase plaque buildup in blood vessels, and cause your blood vessels to thicken and narrow. And unfortunately, smoking harms more than the person doing it. Secondhand smoke is responsible for nearly 34,000 early deaths from coronary heart disease in the U.S. every year in nonsmokers.OK, OK, so what about the big question: Could Mr. Big’s high-intensity Peloton ride really have killed him? Maybe—but probably not. First, consistent physical activity is definitely great for your heart. The general healthy-living guidelines for adults include getting about two hours and 30 minutes every week of moderate-intensity exercise, like going for a speedy walk or—yes!—cycling, per the CDC. Ryan Reynolds, of all people, made this point in a frankly wild ad Peloton posted to Twitter on December 12 when the internet was still reeling from Mr. Big’s death. The video shows Mr. Big looking quite alive and well in front of a romantic crackling fireplace with none other than Allegra, the Peloton instructor from that fateful ride. In the video, produced by Reynolds’s Maximum Effort agency, Reynolds says, “And just like that, the world was reminded that regular cycling stimulates and improves your heart, lungs, and circulation, regular cycling, reducing your risk of cardiovascular diseases.”Twitter contentThis content can also be viewed on the site it originates from.Honestly, he’s not wrong. As SELF has previously reported, improved cardiovascular health is one of the core benefits you can get from a regular cycling habit. But what about high-intensity exercise specifically in people with a history of heart disease? The answer there is a little murkier. In a 2020 scientific statement by the American Heart Association (AHA) published in the journal Circulation, experts evaluated 300 studies that measured the effects of vigorous-to-high intensity exercise. Their findings suggest that although physical activity is good for heart health overall, suddenly engaging in vigorous and high-intensity exercise may increase the relative risk of cardiovascular events in people who have heart disease—especially if those people are typically sedentary. But Mr. Big had been cleared by his doctor to take on such a regimen, and his heart attack happened after his 1,000th ride—so clearly hopping on the bike was a well-worn habit for him by that time. (Also, Carrie joked that he had a love affair with his Peloton trainer, which makes Peloton’s follow-up Twitter video particularly on the nose.) The…big…takeaway is that, like many of us, it seems Mr. Big’s life involved a range of activities on the “healthy” spectrum. And that while Peloton may have appeared to be the culprit of his apparent death, any type of exercise—cycling or otherwise—is overall a great activity for heart health, especially when ramped up over time (and in consultation with a doctor when needed). After his many years of romantic hijinks, none of us should be surprised if Mr. Big actually faked his death to abscond with his Peloton instructor, yet again leaving Carrie to pick up the pieces on her own.Related:

This Scary Health Issue Left Padma Lakshmi on Bed Rest for 3 Months

This Scary Health Issue Left Padma Lakshmi on Bed Rest for 3 Months

Experts don’t know why placenta previa happens, but they have identified a few risk factors, including having previously had a baby, scarring on the uterus from previous surgeries (such as cesarean deliveries, uterine fibroid removal, and dilation and curettage), previously having placenta previa, carrying more than one fetus, being 35 or older, being a person of color, and smoking, the Mayo Clinic explains.Lakshmi also reflected on other parts of her motherhood journey on the podcast. “For a long time, I think as many women, I wasn’t sure I wanted to be a mom in my 20s,” she explained. “But then that changed as I grew older, and I always thought I would be a mother. I always knew I wanted to be a mother. But it wasn’t a concrete idea, I think, until much later.”She shared on the podcast that prior to having her daughter, she was diagnosed with endometriosis and told it “would be very difficult, if not impossible, to become pregnant naturally.”Being diagnosed with endometriosis really put a spotlight on wanting to have children for Lakshmi. “That put the issue very front and center in my mind and I was devastated. I really didn’t know if I was going to be able to have children, and I knew I wanted to have children,” she explained.Endometriosis is a condition that is thought to happen when endometrial tissue (or tissue that acts like it) develops outside the uterus, usually on other organs within the pelvis and abdominal cavity, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. That tissue responds to hormonal changes every month that cause it to bleed and lead to inflammation, swelling, and scarring. It affects around 1 in 10 reproductive-aged people with uteruses, though that may be an underestimate, percent of childbearing-age women and is considered a leading cause of infertility, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine, although it’s certainly not a guarantee that someone won’t be able to conceive.One of the most common symptoms of endometriosis is heavy and extremely painful periods. Other symptoms include breakthrough bleeding, pain during sex, and pain while going to the bathroom, according to the Mayo Clinic. Several other celebrities have spoken about their experiences with endometriosis, including Chrissy Teigen, Olivia Culpo, Savannah Chrisley, Julianne Hough, Tia Mowry, Amy Schumer, Lena Dunam, Halsey, and Sarah Hyland.Related:

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com