Audrey Bruno

30 Grilling Recipes for All Your Summer Barbecue Needs

30 Grilling Recipes for All Your Summer Barbecue Needs

Like beach days and sunscreen, grilling is one of those must-dos when the weather starts to get warm. And there are plenty of easy grilling recipes that will help you make the most of delicious cookout food all summer long—whether you’ve been barbecuing forever or it’s your very first time lighting up a pit.Though grilling can seem daunting at first, this outdoors, hands-on cooking method is no more complicated than your usual stovetop fare once you get comfortable with the basics. There are a couple of simple prep steps you need to take, but the actual cooking involved is just as simple as what you do in your kitchen on a daily basis—especially once you develop an intuitive feel for grilling (and confidence!) after a practice round or two.In fact, once you get the hang of it, cooking over a live fire can actually produce better, more consistent results than oven or stovetop cooking. Instead of trusting that your oven or electric range is at the right temperature or setting a timer and forgetting it, you can actually see and feel where the temperature is higher or lower on the grill when grilling and adjust accordingly. In general, bigger flames will be hotter, smaller ones cooler, and you can easily shift your food around depending on the kind of result you’re trying to achieve. Get a gorgeous char on a turkey or plant-based burger by placing it over a high flame for a couple minutes, for instance, then move it to a cooler spot for a few minutes more to allow the interior to finish cooking (or to keep it warm while your buns finish toasting).It may take a bit of trial and error to get used to the ins and outs of how to grill various foods to perfection, but once you do you’ll never want to go back to cooking inside. Because the best part of grilling—aside from the authentic flavor of food hot off the grates, of course—is the setting you do it in. Nothing beats enjoying the fresh air and beautiful weather, from sunny poolside afternoons to pleasant evening gatherings set to the sound of crickets (or city life), while you’re grilling up a summer feast.What are the steps to grilling?The basic steps of grilling involve cleaning the grill off (if necessary), getting your tools ready, preheating the grill, oiling the grates, getting your ingredients ready, and then cooking.When you break out the grill—whether it’s the first time you’re using it this season, a brand new grill, or just covered in icky stuff from the last use—you’ll need to clean it. Xochitl Bielma Bolton, owner and operator of Boston restaurant Bird & Wolf, tells SELF that you should start by unpacking your grill, removing any dust, and thoroughly washing the grates with soapy water and drying.You’ll also want to make sure you have the right materials on hand—your fuel source (gas, charcoal, or wood chips) and a couple of grilling accessories, Bolton says. As for fuel sources, charcoal and wood chips both add flavor to your food, but charcoal burns much hotter and longer than wood and therefore tends to produce more consistent results. On the other hand, gas grills are more predictable—but won’t infuse that same special, smoky taste into your food. Now onto tools: Grab a set of heat-resistant tongs for moving food around, a water spray bottle for managing heat and flare-ups, and a food thermometer to guarantee all your meat is safe to eat.After that, you’re ready to actually get cooking. First, heat the grill. Begin by starting a fire in the base of your barbecue with your chosen fuel source. If you’re using charcoal or wood chips, a large flame will form at first. As it subsides, you will need to add more fuel to build a base that stays hot enough to properly cook food. This preheating ritual can take up to 25 minutes (and sometimes longer), according to The Kitchn. So be patient and don’t be afraid to get started a little early. If you’re using a gas grill, however, you’ll only need roughly 15 minutes to ensure it’s fully preheated.Next, it’s time to prepare the grates. When everything is hot and ready to go, Bolton says that all you need to do is oil the grates of your grill, either using a wire or silicone pastry brush or a spray bottle. Placing food on an unoiled barbecue will make it more likely to get stuck and your grill much harder to clean later on.Finally, you’re ready to start cooking. The specifics here depend on the food you’re making, the recipe you’re following, and the exact results you’re after, but the gist of the method is always the same: Place your food items on the grill as instructed and tend to them as necessary. This may involve moving the food around based on the kind of heat exposure you’re looking for, for instance, as well as flipping, looking for signs of doneness, opening or closing the grill, and checking the internal temperature (for meat).After you’re done and the grill has cooled down, you’ll want to do a wipe-down to remove food remnants and residue. Regular cleaning will help prevent too much encrusted buildup. (For a deeper clean, follow the directions above or the manufacturer’s instructions.)What is the best thing to cook on the grill?Although there are so many things you can cook on a grill, not all foods are equally suited to this cooking method. In general, sturdier, larger, and more solid ingredients—like whole or halved vegetables or fruits, burgers, whole fish, and uncut pieces of meat—are preferred for grilling.That’s because these kinds of ingredients won’t slip easily through the grates the way some foods might, like chopped vegetables, delicate fish, or crumbly or semi-liquid ingredients. With many of these smaller or less cohesive ingredients—like sliced veggies, shrimp, or cubed meat—skewering is the way to go. Other times, like with a super tender fish filet or bunch of asparagus, foil packs are your answer. Grilling recipes will indicate when these methods are a good idea.What should I grill for the first time?The best grilling recipes for first-timers are the simplest ones. Think more substantial veggies and proteins that don’t require so much fine-tuning for excellent results.For beginner-friendly grilled dinner ideas, Bolton suggests starting with seasonal summer vegetables—think corn on the cob, halved zucchini, or bell peppers—and a forgiving protein, like chicken. (Salmon or burgers would also work.) That way, you can get comfortable with your home barbecue set-up and practice your hand. Over time, you’ll develop a more instinctive sense for how long various foods take on the grill or exactly what they look and smell like when they’re done just how you like them.This list below has got you covered—we’ve rounded up 30 easy grilling recipes that are perfect for beginners and experts alike. From meaty BBQ ideas to veggie-forward masterpieces, these are destined to be at your next summer barbecue.

45 Delicious Spinach Recipes for Getting Your Greens

45 Delicious Spinach Recipes for Getting Your Greens

Spinach is one of those ingredients that a lot of people like to keep on hand for its versatility. The sheer variety of spinach recipes out there prove that the tender and nutritious leafy green is among the culinary world’s greatest green chameleons. Though perhaps most famous for appearing fresh in salads, there are almost limitless ways to put the veggie to work. From simply sautéed with garlic to stewed into a zesty shakshuka, there is almost no way to go wrong cooking spinach.Spinach is also popular because it’s super nutritious, reasonably priced, and widely available year-round. That makes it a cost-effective, reliable source of nutrients. Spinach is packed with essential vitamins and minerals—including vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like folate, iron, magnesium, and potassium, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.The one potential drawback of fresh spinach is its relatively short shelf life. How short depends on a few factors, but having to toss out spinach that you waited too long to use happens to the best of us at some point. (Seriously, who isn’t familiar with the tragedy of discovering a bag of forgotten, swampy spinach in the back of their crisper drawer?) Read on for helpful information on how long spinach lasts, how to store it so it stays good as long as possible, how to use up an overabundance of fresh spinach, and what to do with it once it’s gone slimy—plus, ideas about how to cook spinach and the best spinach recipes.How long does spinach last in the fridge?In general, you’ll have a few days to use up fresh spinach, though it depends on how fresh the spinach was when you bought it, the best-by date on the package, and the storage conditions in your fridge.When buying spinach, make sure to grab a bag or bunch that looks fresh and is being kept cool at the store, and put it in your fridge (at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below) within two hours of purchase, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) instructs.Fresh bunches of spinach are best enjoyed within three to seven days, according to the United States Department of Agrciculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). The USDA recommends storing it lightly packed in a plastic or cellophane bag in the crisper section of the fridge. (Pro tip: Slip a paper towel or two into the bag to help absorb moisture and extend its freshness.) Then rinse under running water and pat dry right before using. Bags and cartons of pre-cut, pre-washed spinach should generally be consumed within three to five days for peak freshness and quality, per the FSIS.All that said, keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need to toss fresh spinach past its best-by date. While it may not be at its literal best, it should still be OK to eat for a few days more as long as it has been stored properly and still smells and looks good, according to the USDA. Bags of fresh-cut leafy greens, for instance, often have a shelf life of around 12 to 16 days from the time they’re packed at the plant or store until they expire, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Just be sure to smell and visually inspect the leaves for any signs of spoilage first—more on that below.What can I do with slimy spinach?Sadly, there’s only one thing to do with slimy spinach: Toss it. It might seem like a waste, but by the time spinach is becoming slimy it’s too late.Spinach that looks a little bit limp or wilty is OK. But an icky or off smell, taste, or texture—anything in the vicinity of slimy, mushy, or funky smelling—indicates that a food is starting to decompose and spoil, the USDA explains. That’s why you should always throw away all produce that appears rotten, per the FDA.What can I do with too much fresh spinach?If you have more fresh spinach than you know what to do with before it goes bad—or your spinach is still good but past its prime—fear not. Cooking this leafy green will immediately collapse it down into a more manageable volume, allowing you to enjoy it without it going to waste.A great place to start is with one of the awesome dishes featured in this collection of delicious and creative spinach recipes. But if you don’t have the time or ingredients on hand to make a whole meal featuring spinach, you can just steam or sauté it all on the stovetop. Then you’ll have a healthy batch of cooked greens in the fridge that you can enjoy as a side dish throughout the week.What food goes with spinach?A better question is what food doesn’t go with spinach. Unlike pungent kale or bitter arugula, spinach has a very mild flavor—a little earthy, just a tad sweet—that pairs well with most other ingredients.As you’ll find in these spinach recipes, the green is a great addition to nearly any savory meal, which makes it one of the best options for packing in extra veggies. It’s great for tossing right in the mix—taking on surrounding flavors while adding some pretty color, bulk, and nutrients to whatever you’re making. Think grain bowls, pastas, casseroles, soups, stews, sandwiches, frittatas, noodle dishes, and more—and even baked goods. Spinach also works as a quick, simple veggie side—sautéed with a little olive, garlic, and lemon perhaps—alongside a roasted chicken breast, nice steak, or seared fish filet, for instance.These 45 spinach recipes showcase the best of your options, from classics (like creamed spinach and sautéed spinach), to sweet treats (like pancakes and muffins), to fresh spinach recipes (like salads and smoothies.) If you thought the veggie was simple and ordinary, these ideas will definitely give you a fresh perspective.

How to Make a Perfect Pot of Rice Without a Rice Cooker

How to Make a Perfect Pot of Rice Without a Rice Cooker

Like hard-boiling eggs and basic knife tricks, knowing how to cook rice is one of the fundamental building blocks of successful home cooking. After all, satisfyingly starchy meals are never far away with this essential skill in your back pocket. But how do you make sure your rice is cooked to perfection every time?Sure, you could use a handy digital rice cooker to help simplify the process. But the truth is that you definitely don’t need one to prepare this seminal grain to perfection. In fact, you probably already have all the necessary tools to make beautifully fluffy rice on your stovetop—all you really need is a lidded pot, salt, tap water, and, of course, a big bag of rice. Plus some rice-cooking know-how, of course—which we’ll get to in a minute.The fact that you don’t need any special equipment to make great rice is just one of many reasons why people love this cornerstone grain, which features in a wide variety of cuisines around the world. (You probably can’t say the same for cauliflower rice, can you?) Along with being an inexpensive, shelf-stable pantry staple, rice is also extremely versatile in the kitchen, as well as ideal for meal prep. Whether you’re preparing a batch of rice in advance for grain bowls, making a simple side, or turning it into the main event (think: stunning dishes like Persian tahdig or Spanish paella), there’s almost no way to go wrong with rice.Though knowing how to make rice is a basic skill, that doesn’t mean that every technical aspect of cooking rice properly is so simple. That’s why we’ve got expert-approved tips and answers to common questions like “how long does rice take to cook?” that will make the process easy every time, no matter what variety of rice you’re using. Expect a bit of trial and error in the beginning as you become familiar with the sights and smells of a well-cooked pot of rice. But once you have a bit of experience under your belt, you’ll be able to make a delicious, freshly cooked pot of rice with your eyes closed.What are the most common rice varieties?Jasmine, basmati, and brown rice are among the most common varieties of rice at the store, but they’re by no means the only ones. There’s also wild, black, red, sushi, and arborio rice—along with countless sub-varieties of white rice from many regions around the globe.There are three umbrella categories of rice, distinguished by the length of the grain: short-grain, medium-grain and long-grain rice. They’ve got different textures and therefore lend themselves well to different types of dishes. Shorter rice varieties, like Calrose and arborio, are used for sushi and risotto-style dishes because they produce creamy, stickier, starchier final products. Long-grain rice varieties are dry and better at fluffing and crisping, so they’re more ideal for both crunchy fried rice dishes and delicate, steamed rice recipes. And medium-grain rice is somewhere in the middle.Should you rinse rice?Although rinsing rice isn’t an absolute must, it is highly recommended. Rinsing your rice before cooking is a good idea because it washes away grime and starch that may otherwise make your rice sticky or gloopy when it should be fluffy, Maxine Yeung, R.D., trained chef and owner of The Wellness Whisk, tells SELF. It’s also fast and easy to do.How do you rinse rice?There are a couple of simple methods to quickly rinse rice in your kitchen sink. You can fill a large pot with rice and water, swirl things around to loosen up the excess gunk, and then pour out the dirty water, or you can simply run water directly over a sieve full of rice.

25 Strawberry Desserts to Help You Ring in Spring

25 Strawberry Desserts to Help You Ring in Spring

Much like spring, strawberry season is short and sweet. From the first warm day on, you have a limited amount of time to make as many strawberry desserts as possible while the fruit is at its flavor peak—which is during June in most of North America, according to Epicurious. Though it can be hard to resist the urge to devour an entire carton on your way home from the farmers market, so much potential lies ahead if you’re willing to wait (or splurge for two cartons—one for now, one for later).While this ruby red berry is definitely a treat on its own, it can be truly phenomenal with the right recipe. Whether you’re looking for a baking project to test your skills or a speedy dessert that you can enjoy in mere minutes, there’s almost always a way that strawberries can be of service. Need to satisfy a sweet tooth stat? Blend up a simple strawberry smoothie recipe. Want to spring-ify an old favorite? Try strawberry banana bread. Or, go all out and use strawberries to fill and decorate a decked-out cake for spring. As for how to properly wash this fruit before getting started, that part is easy. Avoid soaking strawberries in water for an extended period of time because they’re highly porous and will act like a sponge, as SELF previously reported. And don’t remove the stems before washing, as doing so creates another opening where water can enter—you’ll end up with mushy, waterlogged berries. Just wait until you’re ready to get baking, then simply place the berries in a colander and run under a faucet until all visible dirt is gone, and gently pat dry. Next step? Whip up one of these 25 easy strawberry recipes. These fresh ideas will help you figure out what to do with strawberries galore while they’re in season—and churn out some of the most beautiful and delicious springtime treats you’ve ever seen or tasted. 

How to Actually Make Bone Broth

How to Actually Make Bone Broth

But it’s hard to say how exactly how much protein is infused into the broth, and the nutritional content is going to vary widely based on the cooking time and temperature, as well as the type of bones. For instance, a 2019 study published in The International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism found bone broth samples were unlikely to provide a predictable amount of various amino acids—although the researchers did note that the samples of homemade varieties tended to be higher in amino acids than commercially prepared ones.Even if bone broth contains a decent amount of collagen, the connection between collagen consumption and oft-touted benefits like skin health, for instance, isn’t super strong. As SELF has previously reported, many doctors aren’t convinced that consuming collagen does much to promote skin health because it’s mostly broken down by the digestive system before it even has a chance to reach your bloodstream and skin.Ultimately, there isn’t much evidence on whether consuming bone broth will do anything substantive for your health—we need to study it more first. But while it’s unclear whether there’s much that’s truly nutritionally unique about bone broth, it’s unlikely to hurt, and could indeed be providing benefits that haven’t been measured yet. Plus, it’s hydrating! So if it makes you feel good and tastes good to you, drink up. What kind of bones do you need for bone broth?Though you technically can throw just about any animal bones into a large stock pot and call it a bone broth, some types of bones will give you better results than others—and the more meaty tissue, the better. “You want meaty bones with a lot of connective tissue, and neck and feet bones are a great place to start,” Canora explains. As for the type of animal bones that you use, that’s all up to your preference. Bones from pigs and ruminants (like cattle, goats, and sheep) will produce more fat and collagen than poultry like chicken or turkey. You might actually prefer the flavor and lighter consistency of poultry-based bone broths. Or, you can do a mix of different kinds of animal bones. How do I add flavor to bone broth?“One of the many great things about broth is how amenable it is to flavoring,” Canora says. Basically, you can infuse bone broth with pretty much any variety of aromatics, herbs, spices, and veggies, and be able to expect great flavor. Most times, Canora likes to keep things simple by pairing his bones with a basic mirepoix—a mix of carrots, celery, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns, and sometimes tomato. But he’s also found success adding star anise and orange rind to a duck-based broth, as well as spices like garam masala to lamb-based broths. Feel free to get creative and follow your instincts here. Another tip for peak flavor is to consider blanching and roasting your bones before you start simmering your broth. Blanching removes impurities that may cause unwanted odors, and roasting caramelizes and adds color that will eventually turn into a greater depth of flavor in your tasty stock. How long do I need to cook bone broth?The length of time that it takes you to prepare a bone broth depends on the type of bones you use and how large they are—as well as who you ask, frankly. You can tell the bones are spent when there’s no meat or fat left on them and they’re totally clean—usually after roughly 14 to 16 hours, depending on how large your bones were and the recipe you’re following.

30 Quick Vegetarian Dinners Packed With Protein

30 Quick Vegetarian Dinners Packed With Protein

Whether you’re a committed herbivore or you just dabble in the world of meatless meals, a go-to roster of high-protein, quick vegetarian dinners can help ensure you stay full and satisfied (but still ready for dessert, of course, should the mood strike).  Why the focus on protein? This macronutrient has a filling effect, so it’s a key player in creating satisfying meals—that are less likely to leave you feeling hungry shortly after you eat them. There’s no one-size-fits-all amount of protein that works for everyone, since recommendations depend on a variety of factors, including your age and activity level. But a good rule of thumb, especially if you exercise regularly, is to aim for around 20 to 30 grams of protein at each meal, as SELF previously reported.A dish built around a substantial piece of meat tends to get the job done for carnivorous folks. But when you’re eating meatless, hitting your protein quota usually involves relying on a mix of ingredients. Tofu, tempeh, beans and lentils, and eggs or dairy are some of the first vegetarian protein sources that come to mind, but you’ve got plenty more to work with. Nuts and seeds, nut and seed butters, whole grains, and even pasta all serve up smaller amounts of this crucial macronutrient that can nudge your meal’s overall protein content a little higher.These quick vegetarian dinners make use of all of the above (plus plenty of veggies and other tasty add-ins) to help you get your fill of plant-based protein. And we promise they’re actually fast! As in, dinner will be ready in 30 minutes max (that’s less time than it takes to watch an episode of You, for perspective). Because while lentil chilis and black bean burgers are both delicious, sometimes you don’t have time for all of that, and you just need a simple, satisfying meal. 

19 Delicious Breakfasts You Can Make in a Mug

19 Delicious Breakfasts You Can Make in a Mug

On especially busy mornings, cooking a meal can feel more like a punishment than the nourishment that it should be. But breakfast in a mug recipes open up a whole world of flavors in a matter of minutes. No, mug recipes aren’t just for the ‘gram. They actually work and can make whipping up a snack or meal—especially breakfast—super convenient. Rather than simply rehydrating yet another bag of instant oatmeal (which, fair), these breakfast ideas allow you to have a diner-worthy dish at a moment’s notice. Most of them don’t even require the advance prep that goes into other quick breakfast ideas like overnight oats and chia pudding. Here’s how they usually work: ingredients—like eggs, flour, and milk—are whisked together in a mug and microwaved for just a few minutes. And that’s really it! Instead of having to stand over a hot stove to be able to enjoy a pancake breakfast, you can simply pop your food in the microwave and get dressed while it cooks itself. That’s the kind of hands-off morning cooking we all need in our lives.Though this formula lends itself to a lot of sweeter treats—French toast, chocolate muffins, and other protein-packed options that can be especially delicious in the morning—it produces a handful of excellent savory dishes as well. Forget about prepping egg muffins ahead of time and make one in minutes with the help of your favorite mug. You can even add a few pre-chopped veggies for a tasty omelet in record time.  These easy 19 breakfast in a mug ideas cover both sweet and savory A.M. favorites, from cinnamon buns and protein muffins to fluffy souffléd eggs. Each one takes less than 10 minutes to make, yet is filled with all the nutrients you need to start your day off on the right foot. With their help, you’ll never dread making breakfast again.

20 Healthy Costco Snacks You Should Stock Up On

20 Healthy Costco Snacks You Should Stock Up On

It’s easy to get derailed in big box stores like Costco, where it seems like they have both everything and nothing you need all at once. But Costco’s healthy snacks are not to be missed. And, luckily, they’re actually kind of hard to miss. Instead of making a beeline for the snack aisle, like you might in a regular supermarket, you’ll begin to spot Costco’s healthy snacks the moment you walk through the entrance. Look past the electronics and you’ll notice mountains of nuts, crackers, and dried fruits already beginning to appear. From there, it’s aisles upon aisles of nutritious and delicious treats just waiting to fill your cart and stomach. Though buying in bulk can sometimes feel like it costs more than it’s worth, there are so many pros to stocking up on a large scale, says Cara Harbstreet, M.S., R.D., of Street Smart Nutrition. “Planning and preparation are key to building consistent habits, and part of that is setting up your environment to have access to what you need,” she explains. Basically, you probably won’t regret having a ton of cans of beans in your pantry, even if it feels excessive to buy that many in the moment. (And you’ll usually end up paying less in the long run despite the higher price upfront.)Yes, there are a lot of pros to shopping at Costco, but there are also a couple of important things to remember to ensure that you get the most out of your bulk-buying experience. For one, Harbstreet suggests sticking to dried and shelf-stable goods so that you don’t have to worry about anything spoiling before you’re able to eat it. And whenever you’re building your Costco shopping list, take stock of your personal situation. Ask yourself what you always have and what your needs are for that particular time of year to minimize food waste. Obviously, snacks are something worth having in bulk all year round, and these 20 picks from registered dietitians are worthy additions to your pantry no matter the season. From zesty olives to sweet dried mango, there’s something in this list for just about every craving. If you can’t make it to the store in person for whatever reason, know that many Costco must-haves—including the products here—can now be found on InstaCart or Costco online. If you’d rather shop in-store but don’t have a membership, see if a family member or friend will be kind enough to lend you theirs (and maybe accompany you on the trip). However you choose to bulk up your pantry, these are some of the best healthy snacks at Costco according to R.D.s. A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, but it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, sure, we’re talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But we’re also talking about foods that help you connect with your culture, promote joy, and simply taste delicious. Some of those foods might fall into conventional ideas of what “healthy” is. And some might not. We selected these recipes with all of that in mind while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.

22 Freezable Soup Recipes That Will Keep You Warm All Winter Long

22 Freezable Soup Recipes That Will Keep You Warm All Winter Long

When the temperatures start to drop, meal prepping a bunch of freezable soup recipes is an easy way to ensure that you always have a quick and warm meal on hand. Rather than having to dice and slice veggies when your hands are still numb from outside, a frozen soup will be ready to eat (and heat you up) after just a quick spin in the microwave. Soups are especially ideal for freezing because they contain a lot of liquid. As this liquid solidifies, it forms a protective layer for the other ingredients and prevents them from getting dried out or freezer-burnt in icy conditions. As long as the whole kit and caboodle is stored at below-freezing temperatures and in an airtight container, your soup should retain its original quality all winter long.The truth is, this logic applies to almost every kind of soup (save for the varieties that are intended to be eaten fresh, like gazpacho). That includes everything from meat-filled freezable soups and stews to vegan lentil numbers. And the best part is that a single soup recipe typically makes a ton of servings, so you can easily have meals for weeks from just one bubbling pot.  For the best results when reheating, try to transfer your soup to the fridge 24 hours beforehand so that it has enough time to fully defrost. If you forget to do this, know that all is not lost—but you may have to microwave or cook it on the stovetop for a bit longer.Winter is coming (and depending on where you live, it may have already made its unofficial debut) so do yourself a favor and fill your freezer with one (or several) of these 22 freezable soups. With options for just about every dietary restriction, including vegan and gluten-free recipes, there’s something on this list for everyone. Some of these recipes may need to be paired with additional food, like a source of carbs, to be truly filling, but many are already jam-packed with all the nutrients you need to feel full and cozy.

30 Ground Beef Dinner Ideas That Are Anything But Boring

30 Ground Beef Dinner Ideas That Are Anything But Boring

Having some ground beef dinner ideas in your back pocket can help make weeknight cooking much easier. Always available at relatively reasonable prices and as versatile as an ingredient can get, this meat has rightfully earned its spot as a mealtime staple. At the end of the day, it’s an easy and convenient protein-rich option for many home cooks. How to cook ground beefFrom hot and fast to slow and low, there are tons of cooking methods that work with this ingredient. The higher the fat content in your ground beef, the more room there is for error, since it becomes much harder to dry out.There’s only one major rule of thumb to remember when you’re wondering how to cook ground beef: Never let it sit at a high temp over a long period of time. As long as you don’t do that, you can usually expect all your burgers, meatloaves, and Bolognese sauces to be tender and juicy rather than dry and chewy. Letting ground beef come to room temperature before putting it into a skillet will help the meat cook more evenly, but it’s not completely essential, especially if the recipe doesn’t call for browning or cooking stovetop.A quick note about plant-based ground beef alternativesIf you’re trying to cut back on red meat for whatever reason, you can still keep these recipes in your regular rotation. There are now so many plant-based meat alternatives that mimic the same texture and have a very similar taste, which make them pretty legit substitutes for the real thing in any ground beef recipe.Whether you’re opting for a vegetarian substitute or keeping it traditional, there are infinite ways to use ground beef and its plant-based counterparts. 30 ground beef dinner ideasWith all that in mind, the ground beef dinner ideas below will show you just how much the humble ingredient is capable of. They include all the classics we know and love—like meatballs and hamburger recipes—as well as a handful of unexpected ideas that showcase the best dinner recipes with ground beef. Many of them are suitable for weekly meal prep (and freezing to eat way later on), but just as many can be made in a matter of minutes on stressful weeknights. Whatever kind of time constraint you’re working under, these recipes will help you figure out what to make for dinner with ground beef. 

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