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How Eighth Generation Jeweler Nour Jahan is Celebrating Light with Her New Line

How Eighth Generation Jeweler Nour Jahan is Celebrating Light with Her New Line

Designer Nour Jahan. Photo: Courtesy of Nour by Jahan
As part of the dynasty behind one of Geneva’s most exclusive jewelry firms Jahan Jewellery, Nour Jahan is a scion of an artistic, creative powerhouse. Her new eponymous line, Nour by Jahan, celebrates her very name, “light,” and in the year since its founding, has already found a popular following among royals and the ultra elite.
Photo: Courtesy of Nour by Jahan
Only 22, Jahan fell in love with jewelry as a young girl. Surrounded by passion, art, and craft from day one, she says of her family’s jewelry business, “I instantly knew it was something that I wanted to be a part of.” While her family moved to Saudi more than 30 years ago, they established their headquarters in Geneva and Jahan was born and raised in the Swiss city. It was at university in London that Jahan started designing, quickly going on to become the first Jahan woman to work at the company in its 170 years of history. “While still in school in Geneva, every day after class I would head straight to our workshop to watch beautiful jewels being created by my uncle Shahpour, CEO of the Jahan Company. I would sit by his side as he analyzed gemstones and refined his designs. With the stones laid out before him, he would explain to me who they were for and what he intended to do with each one. I was fascinated by his boundless knowledge and appreciation of gemmology.”
Play bangle in rose gold. Photo: Courtesy of Nour by Jahan
Jewelers to 35 kings, Jahan Jewellery has flourished in the Middle East and beyond. Personal service is key, along with its “near-miraculous ability to source the most magnificent gems,” according to Jahan. Replete with statement pieces, every design in the new line combines a unique accumulation of knowledge. Her Persian heritage and upbringing have positioned her. “Each design has a special meaning, a story to tell, and I want each jewel to be the wearer’s favorite piece,” she says.
Multicolor sapphire bracelet. Photo: Courtesy of Nour by Jahan
The Nour by Jahan collections all share a common foundation: light. Every piece shines, and movement is a central concept – the stones often appear to float, or dance. The latest collection, called Passion, celebrates the magic of precious stones, rubies, and sapphires. “I have created complete sets which focus on the splendid color of the stone to celebrate them in their full glory,” notes the designer. Vibrant, handpicked sapphires, rubies, and diamonds are placed in harmony in subtly concealed 18ct handcrafted gold settings, inviting the stones to dazzle. “I only choose gems from the best mines in the best locations around the world to ensure the highest quality,” says Jahan.
Play earrings in white gold. Photo: Courtesy of Nour by Jahan
All jewels comply with many initiatives that help make the trade more transparent, like the Kimberly Process for diamonds. “Such procedures not only promote positive development in the country of origin but also reassure clients of our ethicality and responsibility,” assures Jahan. “We are proud to say that all members of our supply chain share the same values and sustainability process.” Each stone is handpicked, and Jahan mentions that she particularly loves blue, pink, and purple sapphires, though diamonds are her personal favorites. “My next design will feature emeralds,” she says, “which I believe bring positive energy; their green color a symbol of hope”.
Read Next: Discover the UAE’s Most Exciting Emerging Jewelry Design Talent at This Exhibition
Originally published in the October 2021 issue of Vogue Arabia

The Style Evolution of Kim Kardashian West, from Socialite to Trendsetter

The Style Evolution of Kim Kardashian West, from Socialite to Trendsetter

There’s no denying, Kim Kardashian, Vogue Arabia’s September 2019 cover star, has an impactful influence on fashion. While today her choices are often sleek and inspiring, her journey to obtaining the polished, Instagram-worthy look has been a little rocky along the way.
When Kardashian first made a name for herself – as Paris Hilton’s stylist and friend – her style featured figure-hugging bodycon dresses, in the noughties IT bags and oversized gold hoops were her go-to accessories of choice. Over a decade later, and beauty mogul has transitioned into a sartorial trailblazer with a fearless approach to fashion. Her daring style is emulated around the world. Whether she’s wearing an emerging streetwear label or a vintage designer relic, the KKW effect has the power to create a new craze, or controversy – either way, she gets people talking.
“I think that Kim Kardashian’s style evolution is definitely something worth mentioning,” says Egyptian celebrity fashion stylist, Yasmine Eissa, “Kim is a perfect reference for how fashion can be a great marketing and PR tool. She started off by wearing high-end party dresses, which were all wearable and could be sourced. She later transformed her style into a bold, unique look. We now see her in second-skin silhouettes, mesh and plastic fabrics, exotic leathers and a lot of pastel and nude colors. She opts for cutouts, transparent pieces, the latest catwalk looks and custom made outfits. Her style is definitely controversial, but it makes her the woman everyone wants to copy.”
In the early years of Keeping Up With The Kardashians, the former reality TV star made laid-back red-carpet appearances in jeans and knee-high boots. This was followed by a series of wrap dresses and platform wedges – before she advanced to designer outfits from the likes of Givenchy, Azzedine Alaïa and Balmain. Kardashian was then spotted on front rows at fashion week and formed close friendships with some of the industry’s most noteworthy names; including Olivier Rousteing, Riccardo Tisci, and Valentino Garavani.
As Kardashian’s style has evolved, we’ve learned to appreciate her elevated take on athleisure, her monochromatic dressing in earthy tones and her interesting play on proportions – often styling an exaggerated fur coat with a waist-pinching bodysuit. In recent years, she has taken inspiration from her former designer-husband Kanye West and adopted a low-key, street-inspired aesthetic, yet she has always maintained a penchant for skintight silhouettes that have become her signature style throughout the years.
Read Next: 9 Times Kim Kardashian West and Kanye West Served Couple Goals in Style

Citizen Boosts Solar Energy with New Navihawk

Citizen Boosts Solar Energy with New Navihawk

Citizen launches a new limited edition pilot’s watch this week in conjunction with 1% for the Planet and Everybody Solar, two energy conservation organizations.
The watch, which joins the Promaster series, is an Eco-Drive (light- powered) Limited Edition Navihawk. The 48mm black ion-plated steel watch boasts a cobalt blue dial with pilot-friendly orange accents.
The new Citizen Promaster Eco-Drive Limited Edition Navihawk.
The watch includes not only fully synchronized radio-controlled timekeeping technology (which will update time automatically in twenty-six time zones) but also a chronograph, a complete perpetual calendar, 12/24-hour time options, a power reserve indicator and day/date display.
Citizen’s Eco-Drive technology, demonstrated here, powers the watch using only light.
Sales of the watch will benefit the two conservation organizations and Citizen’s new “Purposeful Power” ad campaign. For every #mylight moment shared to @citizenwatchesus, Citizen will donate $5 to Everybody Solar towards the goal of 100% funding of a solar installation project next Spring. This would be the second joint project  between Citizen and Everybody Solar. In recent months, Citizen’s donations helped complete the new 35 kilowatt (kW) array at Glacier National Park’s headquarters.
“Our message of Purposeful Power is aspirational so as to reflect the desire of both the Citizen brand and our consumers to treat the planet, and those around us, with respect and to make a positive contribution to the world,” says Jeffrey Cohen, President of Citizen Watch America.
Citizen includes a matching Citizen clock with each watch.
Citizen is limiting production of the watch to 1,500 pieces worldwide. As an added bonus, Citizen is also including a matching Citizen clock with each watch. Price: $850.

Day in the Life of Somali Model Rawdah Mohamed

Day in the Life of Somali Model Rawdah Mohamed

She documented human history in For Sama, but for Oscar-nominated Waad Al-Kateab, the fight continues until Syria is free and justice is served.
Waad Al-Kateab wears Jumpsuit, Emilia Wickstead; earrings, Cleopatra’s Bling. Photography: Sebastian Böttcher
Waad Al-Kateab is sitting in the Channel 4 news offices in London. Her hair cut in a neat, long bob, she’s wearing a floral summer dress while the bright morning sun shines through the floor-to-ceiling windows behind her. She looks like any ordinary 29-year-old woman. Yet she’s anything but. In 2011, Al-Kateab was an activist with a camera who went on to film one of the most important documentaries of the 21st century: For Sama. The film spans five years in Syria, starting with the peaceful protests against president Bashar Hafez al-Assad, through the Arab Spring and, ultimately, Al-Kateab being forced to flee the country of her birth in 2016. Unlike some war documentaries, For Sama reveals the full spectrum of humanity beyond the frontlines. While it provides a raw, inside perspective of the horror and systematic attacks on civilians, it also underscores moments of joy. We see Al-Kateab marry Hamza, a doctor who built the hospital in Aleppo where most of the footage is filmed; we witness baby Sama enter the world, and we watch friends and strangers become one community amid darkness and despair.
Al-Kateab, a young filmmaker and citizen journalist who moved to Aleppo to study in 2009, always kept her Sony camcorder rolling, filming approximately 500 hours of footage. It took two years for her and co-director Edward Watts – who she met through her work as journalist for Channel 4 – to cut it down to a 95-minute documentary. For Sama went on to achieve global acclaim, receiving an Academy Award nomination for best documentary feature and winning best documentary at this year’s Bafta awards (where it also set a record for most nominated documentary), as well as four British Independent Film awards. The recognition is testament to Al-Kateab’s talent for showing the human story that so many governments still choose to ignore. Yet, a year after the release For Sama, there is a look of pain and sadness in her eyes. “Nothing has changed in Syria. It’s still happening,” she says. While news coverage of the civil war has decreased and the fanfare surrounding the film has slowed down, the crisis hasn’t ended. “There are still people in Aleppo being shelled and bombed.”
Waad Al-Kateab wears Dress, pants, Simone Rocha; earrings, Cleopatra’s Bling. Photography: Sebastian Böttcher
Does she feel guilty for leaving? Her body closes in on itself; she folds her arms and her eyes well up. “If we were there, we could help a little,” she says, her voice faltering. “One day I risked my life and went to Aleppo. I felt it was the right thing to do. Now, I know it’s the right thing to do but I feel I’m not able to do this. I’m not the same person who left the city in 2016. It’s confusing and the guilt is something I don’t expect I will get away from.” Of course, if she hadn’t left Aleppo, fleeing after Russia threatened to bomb the last hospital where they were working, For Sama may never have reached the big screen. “Sometimes I feel that was right, but there are times when I think, maybe I’m just saying this because I want to make it easier for myself,” she considers. “When I’m talking to someone who is still in Aleppo, I feel so much shame. I’m trying to help but I’m not there. It’s hard.”
Witnessing so much tragedy has left Al-Kateab battling with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. “My main problem is the nightmares. It’s still very real for me – I’ve never been able to ignore what happened,” she shares. She even feels guilty for having nightmares. “I know that whatever I feel now is nothing compared to what is still going on in Syria. What happened to me is just a little compared to other people. I would love one day to feel some healing, but the only thing that will help me do that is feeling justice for Syria and its people.”
Waad Al-Kateab wears Dress, Worme; shoes, Manolo Blahnik; earrings, Ara Vartanian; ring, Waad Al-Kateab’s own.Photography: Sebastian Böttcher
After fleeing Aleppo, Al-Kateab and her family lived briefly in Turkey before seeking asylum in the UK. That’s the abridged version – the full tale is one full of bureaucracy failings and political injustice.
Her family arrived in London in 2018, after the 2016 Brexit referendum, the result of which was in large part prompted by voters’ issues with border control around an influx of migrants and refugees. “I mean, oh my God,” she says, half laughing about the difficult timing. Yet, ever the pragmatist, Al-Kateab decided to not only be a voice for Syrians, but refugees, too. “I feel that I can affect people in their thinking about what it means to be a refugee, and why it’s important for us to not close ourselves. At the Baftas, I was the only refugee nominated. I felt that I was in a position where I could fight for different issues.”
“The most important thing is to maintain the conversation about Syria… it’s never too late for accountability and justice”
While she feels accepted in the UK, Al-Kateab struggles with displacement. She and her family never intended to leave Aleppo. They risked their lives and the lives of their children – she was pregnant with their second child – to stay in Syria. “When I watch the film I’m able to accept everything that happened to us, but the displacement I can’t feel OK about – when we were saying goodbye to the city…” She trails off briefly. “We were fighting so hard to stay.”
Al-Kateab’s daughters, Sama, who is now four-and-a-half, and Taima, who is three, have settled into life in England. Like her mother, Sama initially experienced nightmares. “We had doctors help her and she is much better. She rarely wakes up at night crying or screaming now,” Al-Kateab shares. The girls have adapted so well that they even have London accents, which Al-Kateab half-facetiously seems less than keen on – not so much for the actual dialect than for their heritage. “They are happy,” she says, smiling. “They speak a mix of English and Arabic. We are trying to keep the Arabic level good, but it’s difficult.”
Waad Al-Kateab wears Dress, Roksanda; shoes, Jimmy Choo; earrings, rings, bracelets, Bar Jewellery; ring, Alighieri. Photography: Sebastian Böttcher
While Sama is too young to remember what she witnessed in Aleppo, her mother aims to keep the girls connected to their roots. Al-Kateab is hopeful. “As Sama grows older, she will be able to understand more. We try to keep the conversation about Aleppo and Syria and I’m trying to tell them stories before bed. I want to keep part of that culture that Hamza and I believe in, and we feel that they should know where they come from, including all the elements like Ramadan and Eid.” One way to understand is to watch her searing documentary. “I don’t know if I will show them the film,” says Al-Kateab. “We need to see when they are ready. Sama has seen the trailer – she loves to watch it.” Naya al Altrash, the daughter of a family friend, Afraa Hashem – both of whom feature in For Sama – was shown the documentary when she was six. “The film answered so many questions for her,” explains Al-Kateab. “She was three-and-half when she left. Now, she is able to see the story as someone from the inside and the outside.”
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Since moving to London – the family was granted leave to remain shortly after arriving – Hamza is no longer practicing as a doctor but is working towards a master’s degree in public health. Al-Kateab continues to work as a journalist for Channel 4, producing stories on justice, Syria, and Covid-19. She is also dedicated to three major ventures: a fiction project related to Syria, a new documentary, and Action for Sama, an ongoing campaign to end the targeting of healthcare facilities in Syria. It’s currently building a case against the Syrian regime and Russia for alleged war crimes – For Sama footage will be used as evidence. “The most important thing is to maintain the conversation about Syria,” Al-Kateab says. “If it’s too late for governments to intervene and stop it, it’s never too late for accountability and justice.”
While Al-Kateab may feel guilt for not being in Syria, she continues to fight for Aleppo from afar. “My main hope is to see something changed in Syria soon. I hope we can return to the place we fought for,” she says. Her dream is for citizens to feel empowered. “That’s why this whole Syrian revolution started. If we felt that we were being respected, or empowered, I think the situation wouldn’t have come to this.” After her years staring death in the eye, her words are poignant. “When I was in Aleppo, I was forced to live as if every moment was my last. Until today, I feel that this is the best thing to do. There is not a lot of time in the future so everything you want to do, do now. Tell everyone you love that you love them, right now. Don’t hide any of these feelings because when you have lost them, there is no more time.” 
Read more: Meet The Beirut Fashion Designers Refusing To Give Up Hope

The Las Vegas Concours d’Elegance Is Back to Benefit the Miracle Flights Charity

The Las Vegas Concours d’Elegance Is Back to Benefit the Miracle Flights Charity

It’s nice to see automotive concours events back (almost) in full swing, each of us having been deprived of enjoying beautiful collector cars arrayed in tranquil outdoor settings for more than a year. There’s one aspect of a concours, however, that receives far less attention than the vehicles themselves, and that would be the worthwhile charity organizations for whom donations abruptly stopped with the temporary cessation of these shows.

The fundraising has fired up again, though, as this year marks the return of the Las Vegas Concours d’Elegance, founded by Stuart Sobek in 2019, which is back for its second running with more than 100 automobiles ready to be showcased. Presented by Towbin Motorcars of Las Vegas, the exhibition benefits Miracle Flights, a national nonprofit established in 1985. Based in Las Vegas, the organization provides free air transportation to children and adults who need help reaching specialized medical care far from home. The setback to commercial air travel during the pandemic was substantial, yet the need for medical air transportation didn’t diminish. Throughout this time, Miracle Flights supported patients and families across the United States with more than 600 lifesaving flights every month, thanks to the generosity of donors nationwide.

Cadillac will be the featured marque at this year’s exhibition. 

Photo: Courtesy of the Las Vegas Concours d’Elegance.

The 2021 Las Vegas Concours d’Elegance is preceded by two days of preshow festivities before the main event is held on October 23 at the Las Vegas Ballpark in Summerlin. The facility’s playing field will set the stage for cars displayed from notable private collections and museums across the country. In 2019, for example, the one-and-only 1938 Hispano-Suiza Dubonnet Xenia (opening image) was a prized entry.

A Chanel handbag would be right at home in this Spyker C8 entry. 

Photo: Courtesy of the Las Vegas Concours d’Elegance.

Visitors to the Las Vegas Concours will be able to see the automobiles up close, as well as having the opportunity to get a bird’s-eye view from the stadium seats. With fins aplenty, this year’s featured marque is Cadillac, while 14 other judged classes include Pre-1916 and Vintage, American and European Classics to 1948, Prewar Sports, Auburn Cord Duesenberg, Postwar Sports and Racing, and Supercars 1971 to 1990.

Judging a classic at the Las Vegas Concours d’Elegance. 

Photo: Courtesy of the Las Vegas Concours d’Elegance.

Among the prestigious accolades bestowed are the Helene Awards, honoring the achievements of specific individuals, and the Best in Show given to the collector car deemed most desirable. A final highlight is the closing day Tour d’Elegance, where many of the iconic four-wheelers parade on the Las Vegas Strip.

Learn more about Robb Report’s 2022 Car of the Year events taking place in Napa Valley here and in Boca Raton here.

Zendaya to Become the Youngest Ever Recipient of CFDA’s Fashion Icon Award

Zendaya to Become the Youngest Ever Recipient of CFDA’s Fashion Icon Award

Photo: Instagram/@zendaya
At the age of 25, Zendaya is set to make history as the youngest ever recipient of CFDA’s Fashion Icon award at the CFDA Fashion Awards. On November 10, the Euphoria actor will be presented the award by the Council of Fashion Designers of America, recognizing her impactful sartorial statements over the years. Since rising to fame, Zendaya has served many stunning fashion moments, with a record of supporting both emerging and established designers. With this award, the Dune star will join David Bowie, Beyoncé, Pharrell, Jennifer Lopez, and Rihanna who have previously received the award.
The CFDA also revealed that actor Anya Taylor-Joy will be receiving the first-ever Face of the Year Award. With film and television credits that include The Queen’s Gambit, and One Night in Soho, Taylor-Joy has become the face of modern-day vintage Hollywood beauty, especially since her appearance at this year’s Venice Film Festival.

Photo: Instagram/@anyataylorjoyThe Model Alliance will also be honored for its work to continuously support and advocate the rights of models and garment workers. Founded by American model and labor activist Sara Ziff, the organization is tackling issues including sexual harassment and financial exploitation, while working on recognizing models with equal rights. “Hopefully with this recognition from the CFDA, we’re moving towards a reckoning that models are not just pretty faces—we are workers deserving of rights and protections, and we want to use our visibility to inject a labor consciousness into the industry at large,” Ziff said to Vogue.
The Council of Fashion Designers of America is a non-profit trade association founded in 1962 by publicist Eleanor Lambert. Making a grand return this year after being held on pause by the Covid-19 pandemic, it will award designers like Dapper Dan, Aurora James, and journalists like Nina Garcia for their positive global impact on the fashion industry.
Read Next: Zendaya and Timothée Chalamet Do Red Carpet Clashing the Right Way

9 of the Best Online Vintage Stores to Shop at Now

9 of the Best Online Vintage Stores to Shop at Now

Photo: Getty
Vintage is having a revival right now, both on the runways and via celebrities, such Bella Hadid and Rihanna, who have been leading the charge. Luckily, an array of online vintage shops, beloved by fashion insiders, means that sourcing archive designer pieces is easier than ever – and means you, too, can be the proud owner of ’90s Jean Paul Gaultier or Tom Ford-era Gucci.
Below, we pick nine of the best online vintage stores to shop now.

Shrimpton Couture
Toronto-based Shrimpton Couture is known for its incredible archive, which ranges from Marc Bohan-era Dior (the inspiration behind the French fashion house’s spring/summer 2022 collection) to ’90s Versace. With Rihanna, Tracee Ellis Ross and Ruth Negga among its fans, you’d better be quick off the mark if you want to snap up a vintage gem.
What Comes Around Goes Around
After more than 25 years in the business, What Comes Around Goes Around is one of the most famous vintage stores in the world, and with good reason. From iconic It-bags to rarer collectible pieces, it’s a must visit for any vintage lovers out there.
Amore Vintage Tokyo
Tokyo’s Amore Vintage has become a popular destination for archive hunters, thanks to its vast collection of brightly-coloured ’90s Chanel bags. Other pieces to watch out for include special-edition Dior saddle bags, as well as vintage Versace sports jackets.
James Veloria
If you’re on board with the trend for ’90s nostalgia right now, then James Veloria offers a treasure trove of vintage finds, ranging from Jean Paul Gaultier to Versace. With Dua Lipa’s stylist Lorenzo Posocco recently paying a visit, expect to see James Veloria-sourced pieces on the singer soon.
Retold Vintage
For the minimalists among us, Retold Vintage is a go-to, with vintage Calvin Klein, Max Mara and Chloé among its offering. With regular drops, carefully-curated by founder Clare Lewis, quickly selling out, it’s worth subscribing to the Retold newsletter in order to get a preview of the pieces.
Pechuga Vintage
If you’ve been inspired by Adele’s corsetry on British Vogue’s November cover, then Pechuga Vintage is the place to visit for a vintage Vivienne Westwood corset. Known as the “king of corsets”, founder Johnny Valencia’s A-list clientele includes the likes of Miley Cyrus and Megan Thee Stallion.
Susamusa
One of Bella Hadid’s favorite Depop stores, Susamusa (which also has upcycled pieces among its offering) is worth a visit – particularly if you’re looking for Y2K denim. Hadid was recently spotted in a long patchwork denim skirt sourced by Susamusa, reviving the divisive Noughties trend.
Nina Gabbana Vintage
The source of Rihanna’s vintage Dior finds, Paris-based Nina Gabbana Vintage is full of hidden gems – whether it’s vintage Gucci (as recently worn by Ariana Grande) or ’90s Prada corsets (we’re obsessed). On the jewelry front, Gigi Hadid was also recently seen wearing a Dior pearl choker found via Nina Gabbana.
Menage Modern Vintage
If you’re in need of a mood-boosting knit this winter, then look no further than Menage Modern Vintage. In fact, the London-based store supplied many of the key looks worn by Emma Corrin as Princess Diana in season four of The Crown, from a Liberty print dress to a Valentino skirt suit.
Read Next: Bella Hadid’s Most Championed Sustainable Brands
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

An iPhone Maker Just Debuted a Luxury EV Sedan Concept Designed by Pininfarina

An iPhone Maker Just Debuted a Luxury EV Sedan Concept Designed by Pininfarina

Foxconn wants to join the electric revolution.

The Taiwanese tech company, which is best known for manufacturing the Apple iPhone, announced official plans to get into the electric car business on Monday. And to show just how serious the company is about its surprising pivot, it unveiled three battery-powered prototypes: a luxury sedan, a crossover SUV and a bus.

As is the case with its most famous product, it doesn’t sound like Foxconn plans to sell EVs itself. They will instead be released under the “Foxtron” brand in partnership with other automakers, like Taiwan’s Yulon Motor Group, which built the prototypes on display Monday, according to a press release. It would seem that Foxconn’s real focus is on the platforms on which the vehicles are built. The company is promising some pretty big things from its all-new electric architecture, too, like 400-plus mile range and lightning-quick acceleration.

Foxtron Model C SUV 

Foxconn

Perhaps the most intriguing of the trio us the Model E luxury sedan. The commanding four-door has a sleek design courtesy of longtime-Ferrari partner Pininfarina and a brutish powertrain. It’s unclear how many motors it will feature, but the tech company promises it will be capable of delivering 750 hp, launching from 0 to 62 mph in 2.8 seconds and have an impressive 466-mile range. Those figures would put the Model E in the same league as the more powerful versions of the Lucid Air, Tesla Model S and Mercedes-Benz EQS.
Interestingly, the sedan does promise one novel amenity that those cars don’t. The company claims that the rear seating area can be transformed into a “dedicated mobile office.” There were no further details about what this will entail—and Foxconn did not respond to a request for elaboration from Robb Report—but it promises the vehicle will seamlessly connect with your mobile devices, something that could come in very useful for those whose jobs require constant connection, even while on the road. Other tech-oriented features include “smart windows” and doors that unlock via facial recognition.

Foxtron Model T bus 

Foxconn

Like nearly every company looking to get into the EV game, Foxconn also intends to roll out a crossover SUV. The Model C features just as much interior space as the Model E, including seating for seven, despite its smaller size. It’s unclear how powerful it will be, but the company says the car will be able to accelerate from 0 to 62 mph in 3.8 seconds and travel 434 miles on a single charge. Meanwhile, the Model T—which we have to assume will have to undergo a name change if it’s ever released stateside—is a large bus that will be able to carry a full load of passengers 250 miles without stopping.

No release dates were announced for the Foxtron line of EVs, but it would seem Foxconn is ready to get to work. Last month, it acquired EV startup Lordstown Motor’s Ohio factory, according to CNET Roadshow. And earlier this summer, the company also bought its own semi-conductor chip plant. We’ll soon find out whether phones or electric cars make for better business.

Row DTLA a New Fashion Business Hub for Fashionphile, Shein, Andrea Pitter and More

Row DTLA a New Fashion Business Hub for Fashionphile, Shein, Andrea Pitter and More

Row DTLA, the 30-acre retail, restaurant and office space in a former wholesale produce mart, is becoming a new hub of fashion business in Los Angeles.The complex signed six new office leases in 2021, including re-commerce brand Fashionphile (7,000 square feet) and fast-fashion giant Shein (2,600 square feet), which join Adidas, Zappos and VF Corp. (parent company to Ella Moss, Splendid, Vans and more).
“We’re in North San Diego County, which we love…but recruiting there in the digital tech space is not as easy as L.A. When we looked [at Row DTLA], we realized these are our people. It’s really a tech center here,” said Fashionphile founder and chief executive officer Sarah Davis, who has hired 37 tech, digital and data team members to work at the office, in addition to staff for a new 656 square-toot retail pop-up shop open through the holidays.

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The growing resale platform has permanent selling studios in six Neiman Marcus stores, including in Beverly Hills and Newport Beach, Calif., and is launching one in its new offices, where customers can resell luxury accessories and receive a check that day.
Pre-loved Chanel flap bags, Gucci slides and Rolex watches are on offer in the space, which sits next to the Pascal Florist. “When you read about the supply chain issues, we don’t have that. I’m predicting a huge holiday for us,” said Davis of the re-commerce opportunity this season. “People who just want to get their husband a Rolex for Christmas, you can’t. You are not getting it. People are literally being forced into our open arms!” she laughed.

Fashionphile’s pop-up store at Row DTLA.
Courtesy Row DTLA

Commerce platform Shopify recently reopened its space at Row for entrepreneurs, offering workshop and events capabilities, podcast and photography space and a pop-up shop for makers to sell their wares.
Meanwhile, Andrea Pitter, winner of Amazon’s fashion competition show “Making the Cut” season two, is opening two brick-and-mortar stores. To pay homage to her New York roots, her 600-square-foot Pantora boutique is decorated like a subway car, with the store name spelled out in tile, a pole and seats for selfies. Featured is her winning ready-to-wear collection of sequined blazers, sheer tops, printed sweatshirts and novelty pants. Opening next door later this year will be her 1,000-square-foot Pantora Bridal, the second location for her Brooklyn-based bridalwear store.

Andrea Pitter’s new store Pantora at Row DTLA.
Courtesy of ROW DLTA

Pitter joins “Making the Cut” season one winner Jonny Cota, and independent fashion brands LVIR, Shades of Grey and Groceries Apparel in opening new stores at Row, which is busiest on Sundays when it hosts the popular Smorgasburg open-air food market.
“In New York, people can walk past Beyoncé and they do not care. In L.A., it’s, oh, you’re from ‘Making the Cut!’ So that’s been different,” said Pitter on Friday, while on a ladder putting the finishing touches on a black rose archway for her new store, which opened Sunday. “The people are nice, and I’ve already seen a lot of looking in the window and whispering.”

Emma Roberts Talks Paris, ‘Pretty Woman’ and Big Teeth

Emma Roberts Talks Paris, ‘Pretty Woman’ and Big Teeth

PARIS — Emma Roberts took it as a sign of good luck that a bug had landed in her Champagne on Monday at the open-air dinner in Paris that jeweler Fred threw in her honor, and the Pretty Woman jewelry range she fronts.The ebullient American actress, wearing a puff-shouldered dress by Carolina Herrera and carrying a feather-y Jimmy Choo clutch, was handed a fresh glass of Ruinart just in time to toast Fred chief executive officer Charles Leung and the guests seated at long tables appointed with pink flowers, red lollipops and personalized napkins.
The collection of heart-shaped jewelry has been a hit for LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton-owned Fred, and helped introduce Millennials and Gen Z to the hit 1990 movie “Pretty Woman” that propelled Roberts’ aunt Julia to superstardom and made a fancy necklace a memorable prop in a pivotal scene.

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“It’s one of those movies that just doesn’t get old,” Roberts enthused during an interview the next day at her suite at the Crillon hotel. “I remember seeing it for the first time, it was on TV and I was probably like 13. I was completely captured by the wardrobe, obviously the iconic jewelry and my aunt’s smile….I remember laughing out loud, but then also it’s very emotional, too.”

Jewelry from Fred’s Pretty Woman collection.
Stephane Feugere/WWD

The “American Horror Story” and “Unfabulous” actress shot the spots for the Pretty Woman jewelry remotely about 18 months ago, but could only now make the trip to France to meet with Fred executives and local press.
Among the most nerve-wracking things about the campaign was wearing red lipstick, which her mother had long banished from the house, figuring her beautiful young daughter did not need much makeup.
“It was just funny because even though I’m 30, I was still nervous to show her the red lipstick on an 8-foot billboard,” she said, referring to the cardboard images hung up for the Paris event.
While holed up doing interviews on Tuesday, Roberts confessed she had managed to buy enough on a single shopping excursion to warrant extra luggage for cashmere sweaters and cotton tote bags from concept store Merci, coffee from Verlet, and books from Shakespeare and Company and W.H. Smith, where Roberts scored “W-3: A Memoir” by Bette Howland that she can’t put down.
A reading enthusiast, Roberts founded the online book club Belletrist with her best friend Karah Preiss, and it has morphed into a production house that adapts their favorite titles for the screen.
First up is “First Kill,” which Roberts describes as a “Juliet and Juliet love story” involving a family of vampires and vampire hunters. The upcoming Netflix series is based on a short story by V.E. Schwab.
Following that is “Tell Me Lies,” described by Roberts as a “relationship thriller” for Hulu based on Carola Lovering’s novel and starring Grace Van Patten.
Roberts, who gave birth to her first child in December, said she’s planning to ride out the balance of the year without making movies in order to enjoy her son Rhodes’ first Thanksgiving and Christmas.
She just wrapped two movies: the psychological thriller “Abandoned” about a couple raising a baby in the middle of nowhere amid strange occurrences, and the “carefree, uplifting” romantic comedy “About Fate,” set in Boston and co-starring Thomas Mann.

With Roberts’ father Eric an accomplished star of small and big screens, has her son shown any signs of inheriting the acting gene yet?
“He’s nine months old,” she said with an incredulous and toothy laugh, then confessing: “Well, it looks like he’s getting the Roberts teeth. His front teeth are coming in, and they’re quite big.”

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