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5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Studio 54-Inspired SS22 Show

5 Things To Know About Fendi’s Studio 54-Inspired SS22 Show

Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
For his first live show since joining Fendi, artistic director Kim Jones was inspired by the late Puerto Rican fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez, and the spirit of Studio 54. Here, fashion critic Anders Christian Madsen breaks down the five key takeaways from the spring/summer 2022 collection.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
It was Kim Jones’s first Fendi show with a live audience
For Kim Jones, who joined Fendi as artistic director between the two lockdowns, and had to present his first collections to a digital audience, his sophomore ready-to-wear show was a special occasion. “This is my first live show for Fendi, and it’s a celebration. Our woman has let loose a bit – she’s going out, dressing up. We’ve all been locked away for so long that I think that’s what we all need right now,” he said.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
It was inspired by Antonio Lopez
Jones found in the Fendi archives a logo hand-sketched by the late Puerto Rican fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez, whose work was defined by the spirits of the 1960s and ’70s. A friend of Karl Lagerfeld – Jones’s predecessor at Fendi – Lopez embodied the decadence and glamour of New York City in the ’70s, and frequented Studio 54, which became the imagined surroundings of Jones’s collection.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Pieces were imbued with Lopez’s sketches
“Lopez was a friend of Karl’s, and has always been someone who inspired me. He was forward thinking; inclusive; looked up to by everyone from Andy Warhol to Steven Meisel and David Hockney. I wanted to introduce him to a new generation,” Jones said. He applied the illustrator’s work to kaftans and shirts, transformed them in intarsia leathers and jacquards, and interpreted them in handbags and hairclips.
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
It was post-pandemic power suiting
More than anything, the collection felt devoted to suiting: a kind of tailoring so empowering and glamorous it had left the territory of office-wear and entered the evening realm. If post-pandemic appetites call for a “dressed” approach to fashion, but aren’t quite ready for a cocktail dress, this was the happy medium (although Jones had a few cocktail options up his sleeve as well).
Photo: Courtesy of Fendi
Fendi is for everyone
“My Fendi is multi-generational. It’s for all different kinds of women – anyone who wants to feel good about themselves. The Lopez woman, and the Fendi woman, is empowered; she’s someone of her own making,” Jones said, drawing a parallel between the diverse stars of the Studio 54 dance floor and the customer base he is creating at Fendi.
Read Next: “Connecting the past with the present,” Kim Jones on His Second Couture Collection for Fendi
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Deep Blue Lights Up

Deep Blue Lights Up

By Gary Girdvainis
One of our favorite American-based dive watch specialists has released another water watch you’re sure to appreciate. Deep Blue’s Daynight Alpha Marine 500 Tritium T-100 Swiss Automatic may be a mouthful to pronounce, but you’ll like what you see at a glance.
The Deep Blue Daynight Alpha Marine 500 Tritium T-100 Swiss Automatic.
Deep Blue is known for its intense lume and superior water resistance, and this new model certainly fills the bill. The watch is cased in a 45mm 316L stainless steel case and is 15mm thick. Inside beats a Sellita SW-200-1 Automatic oscillating at 28,800 vph.
Visible through the 33mm dial aperture are the numerous flat and round self-illuminating tritium tubes, in this case complemented by a fully illuminated dial. Clearly its all about the glow on this watch. Even the 120-click ceramic bezel combines Superluminova numerals and markers with a tritium pip.
As expected, Deep Blues utilizes an extra thick sapphire crystal with AR coating underneath, and another crystal offers a view of the movement from the reverse side.
Water resistant to an impressive 500 meters, the watch head is held in place by a stainless steel bracelet with a multi-function safety and micro-adjustment deployant clasp. Price: $999.

How Tiffany & Co.’s Timeless Pieces are Furthering its Legacy of Women Empowerment

How Tiffany & Co.’s Timeless Pieces are Furthering its Legacy of Women Empowerment

Already an icon in jewelry design, Tiffany & Co. furthers its legacy of female empowerment and sustainability with breath-taking collections that honor its exquisite gems – as well as the women who wear them.
Suhilah (top left) wears Tiffany HardWear necklace, Tiffany T True bracelet, Tiffany T1 bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond ring, Tiffany T1 ring, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Noura (left) wears left hand Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds right hand Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings; dress, Abadia. Afaf (middle left) wears Tiffany HardWear necklace, Tiffany T diamond bangle, Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Sara (middle right) wears Tiffany T1 pendant necklace with diamonds, Tiffany Victoria® Vine ring with diamonds, Tiffany T1 diamond ring, Tiffany Victoria® earrings with diamonds; dress, Self-Portrait at Rubaiyat; pants, Abadia. Aisha (right) wears right hand Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany HardWear bracelet with diamonds left hand Tiffany T T1 ring with diamonds, Tiffany HardWear earrings. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
When thinking of Tiffany & Co., it’s not difficult to conjure images of a blue box, sparkling diamonds, and Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Since its establishment in 1931 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, the American high jewelry brand has come to be synonymous with quality material and novel design.
However, alongside this feat, the house is known to champion women’s empowerment and sustainability. In 2017, the jeweler reinforced its commitment to women’s rights, human rights, diversity, and inclusion by signing on to the United Nations Women’s Empowerment Principles, and continues to invest in programs to advance gender equality. It also remains committed to protecting the planet, setting for itself major sustainability goals for 2025, which prioritize transparency, appropriate waste recycling and land management, water stewardship, and the well-being of its workers. To celebrate the luxury heritage house’s legacy, Vogue Arabia brought together London-based Saudi entrepreneur Aisha Almamy and her sisters Afaf, Suhilah, Noura, and Sara, to present Tiffany & Co.’s most timeless pieces in the September 2021 issue.
Noura (left) wears left hand Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds right hand Tiffany Victoria Vine ring with diamonds; Tiffany Victoria earrings with diamonds. Aisha (middle) wears right hand Tiffany Victoria® ring with diamonds, Tiffany Victoria® Vine ring with diamonds left hand Tiffany Victoria® ring with diamonds; dress, 16Arlington from Rubaiyat. Sara (right) wears Tiffany T1 diamond bangle, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X bangle with diamonds, Tiffany Atlas® X ring with diamonds, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Lynn earrings with diamonds; dress, Self-Portrait at Rubaiyat. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
A reinvention of the classic Tiffany T collection, the Tiffany T1 expands on the iconic motif that John Loring, the company’s design emeritus, introduced in the early 1980s. Gasconading 18ct rose gold bracelets and rings in wide and narrow widths set with pavé diamonds in a honeycomb pattern, everything from the T1 hinged bangle to the circle pendant aims to represent strength and self-empowerment.
Who can forget the Tiffany HardWear collection released in 2017? Looking to New York City and a unisex bracelet found in the house’s 1971 archive for inspiration, the bracelets, necklaces, earrings, and rings play with tension, proportion, and balance. The Link Bracelet, for example, features large-gauge links in glimmering 18ct rose gold accented by shimmering diamonds, while the Drop Earrings encompass a trio of spheres that dangle from delicate ball chains against captivating locks.
On platinum drop earrings, bracelets, and necklaces, the Tiffany Victoria collection blooms into complex mixed-cut diamond clusters suggestive of flower petals, which can be turned into ornamental headpieces for an unexpected graceful detail. Meanwhile, acclaimed jewelry designer Jean Schlumberger’s works pay tribute to the natural world, with its distinctive bloom of colored gemstones, lending to motifs of wildflowers, twisting vines, and honeybees along with the artisan’s signature X on braided 18ct gold rope rings and the timeless Lynn bracelet.
Afaf (left)wears right hand Tiffany T1 narrow diamond hinged bangle with diamonds in 18ct gold, Tiffany T pavé diamond hinged bangle in 18ct gold left hand Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Lynn Bracelet with diamonds in 18ct gold and platinum, Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger® Sixteen Stone ring with diamonds in 18ct gold and platinum; dress, Abadia. Suhilah (right) wears right hand Tiffany T True hinged bracelet in 18ct gold, Tiffany T1 wide hinged bangle in 18ct gold, Tiffany Atlas® X Closed narrow ring with diamonds in 18ct gold, Tiffany T1 narrow diamond ring in 18ct gold, Tiffany HardWear graduated link necklace in 18ct gold left hand Tiffany T1 wide ring in 18ct gold; Tiffany HardWear graduated link earrings in 18ct gold; top, Dolce & Gabbana at Rubaiyat, pants, Philosophy at Rubaiyat. Photographed by Omniya Alshaikh
Atlas X – an update to the iconic Atlas collection – is a nod to the Roman numerals on the clock at the Tiffany Fifth Avenue flagship store in New York City. With powerful angles, clean lines, and statement silhouettes united with graphic simplicity, the collection is crafted from 18ct gold, sterling silver, and pavé diamonds. With three different motifs on earrings, pendants, and more, closed and open forms are juxtaposed in a myriad of textures, robust angles, and modern proportions.
In 2020, Tiffany & Co. launched the Diamond Craft Journey, becoming the first global luxury jeweler to disclose the country where its diamonds and stones are crafted. The journey outlines several steps in the brand’s diamond-making process, including responsible sourcing, cutting and polishing, grading and quality control, diamond setting, and packaging.
Read Next: Beyoncé Wears Audrey Hepburn’s Priceless Breakfast At Tiffany’s Diamonds in Her First Tiffany Campaign
Style: Lina Malaika and Samar EdreesHair: Sawsan LilishMakeup: Eilaf SabbaghOn-set producer: Mohammed JassemProduction: Danica ZivkovicSenior fashion market editor: Amine JreissatiPhotography assistant: Asma AlshaikhMakeup assistant: Maysan HarasaniModels: Aisha, Afaf, Suhilah, Noura, Sara

First Drive: The 2022 Porsche 911 GTS Is the Daily Driver of Our Dreams

First Drive: The 2022 Porsche 911 GTS Is the Daily Driver of Our Dreams

A children’s fairy tale character known to be picky, Goldilocks would approve of the 2022 Porsche 911 GTS. With an appellation that stands for Gran Turismo Sport, this all-new “just right” model slots securely in the middle of the iconic 911 sports car lineup, cleverly representing the near-perfect middle ground in terms of power and performance between the base Carrera and the track-ready GT3.

While all Porsche models target those with a passion for driving, the 911 GTS—configured with an impressive list of standard performance enhancements and upgrades—is aimed squarely at the enthusiast who wishes to enjoy their sports car during the daily commute, and then mimic a racer on the weekends.

Piloting the 2022 Porsche 911 GTS Coupe. 

Photo: Courtesy of Porsche AG.

Porsche is offering the GTS package with a range of 911 body types. These include the 911 Coupe, drop-top 911 Cabriolet, and open-air 911 Targa models. Rear-wheel drive is standard in the Coupe and Cabriolet, with Porsche Traction Management (PTM) permanent all-wheel drive as an option. All Targa models, however, come with PTM as standard fitment.
Porsche has done an exemplary job with the engine. All GTS versions share the twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter flat-six that’s found in the Carrera S, but the turbochargers are fed 14.5 percent more boost to deliver 473 hp and 420 ft lbs of torque. (The engineers increased boost, rather than increase the size of the turbocharger units, as they didn’t want to slow the engine’s responsiveness.) An eight-speed dual-clutch “PDK” automatic is standard, yet Porsche is one of the few automakers still offering a traditional option for purists—a seven-speed manual gearbox that can be selected at no extra cost.

Although the 911 GTS carries the same twin-turbo 3.0-liter flat-six engine as the Carrera S, it’s been bolstered to 473 hp and 420 ft lbs of torque. 

Photo: Courtesy of Porsche AG.

Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) is also standard on the GTS. The adjustable dampers are complemented by a .39-inch reduction in ride height and suspension componentry adapted from the 911 Turbo models (excluding the Targa variants). Speaking of 911 Turbo models, the GTS is also bestowed with the Turbo’s more robust braking package, forged-aluminum center locking wheels (20- and 21-inch in diameter) and an electronically locking rear differential—again, all standard.

Race-Tex, a high-quality microfiber material, is used on the seat centers, steering wheel and door handles. 

Photo: Courtesy of Porsche AG.

Porsche’s 992 chassis is wonderful, and the GTS upgrades and enhancements make a good thing even better. I spent a sunny fall day in Georgia with a manually equipped 911 GTS Coupe fitted with all of the go-fast options, including the Lightweight Package, carbon bucket seats and Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes (PCCB). The 200-mile drive was nothing short of blissful. Testing the stunning Carmine Red two-door north of Atlanta, I didn’t encounter a twisty road in the Chattahoochee National Forest that could challenge the Porsche’s competency.

Thanks to the power increase, the 911 GTS feels significantly stronger than the standard Carrera and Carrera S models. Porsche’s conservative numbers claim the GTS variants will devour the benchmark zero-to-60 mph sprint in about 3 seconds, and it feels every bit that fast. Credit copious amounts of turbocharged torque that comes on strong without hesitation. On public roads, my money says the GTS will rocket out of a corner faster than the revered, naturally aspirated 911 GT3. And the standard sport exhaust system on the GTS sounds outstanding.

A seven-speed manual gearbox can be selected at no extra cost. 

Photo: Courtesy of Porsche AG.

Suspension damping is firm, but it never annoys occupants with harshness or jolting impacts. (PASM allows the driver to toggle firmness independent of driving mode.) The upside of the 911’s sporty suspension and lower ride height is that steering inputs are precise and body roll is minimal. Toss the GTS into a corner and its wide rear tires hunker down and stick, with no understeer or protest from the front end. The level of capability makes the posted speed limits seem ridiculously low. I do this exercise for hours, only stopping to find my water bottle. It has rolled completely out of sight and firmly wedged itself under the seat rails.
Visually, Porsche differentiates the exterior of the GTS models by fitting the SportDesign Package as standard equipment. Gone is much of the brightwork, replaced with black surrounds and accents on the window moldings, badging, grille slats and exhaust pipes. There is obligatory “GTS” badging on the lower portions of the doors and on the tail, too. And on the Targa versions, the roll hoop is finished in black to complete the transformation.

Porsche’s conservative numbers claim the GTS variants will devour the benchmark zero-to-60 mph sprint in about 3 seconds. 

Photo: Courtesy of Porsche AG.

The interior of the GTS lineup is configured with unique upholsteries and special option choices to set it apart. Black Race-Tex, a high-quality microfiber material, is used on the seat centers, steering wheel and door handles. Interior trim is blackened to match the exterior theme, and the Sport Chrono Package is standard. Two unique GTS Interior Packages are offered: Carmine Red and Chalk. Each adds colored contrast stitching throughout the cabin, including the headrest embroidery. The GTS Interior Packages also add even more Race-Tex fabric to the cabin, and carbon-fiber inlays replace most of the aluminum trim.

The GTS may be configured with a range of seats. Standard sport buckets offer four-way adjustments, but they may be upgraded to 14-way and 18-way adjustable seats at an additional cost. A race-ready, carbon-fiber full bucket seat, which is significantly lighter, is also optional on the GTS. While this form-fitting seat saves weight, the fixed seatbacks don’t adjust for rake—it’s no surprise that most people find them a bit too uncompromising on the more refined GTS.

The GTS Interior Package, seen here in Carmine Red, adds colored contrast stitching throughout the cabin. 

Photo: Courtesy of Porsche AG.

New to the GTS is an optional Lightweight Package that saves upwards of 55 pounds (weight is an enemy of performance). The package deletes the tiny rear seats, fits the side and rear windows with thinner glass, adds a lightweight battery and reduces the amount of sound insulation. Rear-axle steering is de rigueur. Porsche engineers also resculpted the rear underbody panels for better aerodynamics, and the powered rear spoiler tilts an additional four degrees further upward. These subtle improvements make this vehicle the first GTS to ever produce downforce.
The Lightweight Package is a mixed blessing. While it does boost performance in a desirable manner, I’d argue that few will notice the weight reduction without putting the GTS on a scale (or timing a lap with a stopwatch). Conversely, everyone will note the dramatic increase in cabin noise. The turbocharged flat-six is markedly louder with the Lightweight Package, which understandably boosts the audible thrill, but also intensifies tire and wind noise. As the added clamor may become tiresome, all but those fully committed to the amplified sports car experience—all the time—may be wise to skip it.

Toss the 911 GTS into a corner and its wide rear tires hunker down and stick. 

Photo: Courtesy of Porsche AG.

Later in the afternoon, I’m stuck in heavy traffic. Instead of crawling at a snail’s pace staring at brake lights, I exit the highway and navigate downtown Atlanta while dodging potholes, broken pavement and defiant cyclists. The GTS adapts to the slower stride, its turbocharged engine tractable even when I lug it in the wrong gear every so often. I’m still enjoying myself, although a look at surrounding motorists reveals that I may be the only one—then again, they aren’t piloting a red Porsche.

It’s extremely easy to like the 2022 Porsche 911 GTS. Although the marque offers a dizzying array of 911 models, a lineup which seems to continuously expand, the GTS is, arguably, the most versatile of them all. Optimized to provide the ideal balance of luxury and athleticism, it’s neither too soft nor too hard. For the impassioned driving enthusiast, the new 911 GTS is simply “just right,” which is why it’s what Goldilocks would have in her garage.

Learn more about Robb Report’s 2022 Car of the Year at the event taking place in Napa Valley here and in Boca Raton here.

Saudi Designer Daneh Buahmad Celebrates a Decade Since Her Brand’s Launch

Saudi Designer Daneh Buahmad Celebrates a Decade Since Her Brand’s Launch

Celebrating a decade since her brand’s launch, the Saudi designer reflects on coming into her own.
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
A modern muse
This year marks a decade milestone for Saudi designer Daneh Buahmad who launched her label Daneh back in 2011. With a focus on comfort, Buahmad is known for her contemporary tailoring, draping, and timeless silhouettes that draw inspiration from men’s thobes. “When I’m designing, the Daneh woman is in my head. She is the woman who is making a difference, achieving her goals, standing up for herself, and has a presence. And that should be every woman,” asserts the designer. Buahmad approaches her craft with a mindset to enable women to feel good, confident, and polished. “It makes me happy when I see any woman wearing my designs, and even happier when I get notes from my customers about compliments they received,” notes Buahmad, whose pieces have been worn by Queen Rania and Melissa McCarthy. As well as a degree in interactive media and a career in IT, Buahmad took courses at Central Saint Martins alongside completing her master’s in London. “My corporate career is a part of me, and fashion design feeds a part of my soul that IT can’t, and I’m happy to be involved in both right now,” she says. Buahmad’s entrepreneurial spirit and sharp eye for sourcing fabrics run through her blood. “My grandmother was a small business owner in fabrics,” she shares. “Her store was full of imported textiles. I used to love seeing all the rolls.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Setting the mood
In her studio, Buahmad finds energy through music. “It’s a big part of my life and I love all kinds of music,” she says. Depending on her mood, she switches between the smooth vocals of Jorja Smith and soulful sounds of Algerian band Tinariwen to Pablo Alborán and songs from the Hamilton soundtrack. Her latest mood board is linked to American singer Donna Summer. “I attended a small wedding when I was young. It started out normal with negazi music that suddenly stopped, and disco started playing,” she reminisces with laughter. “I’m working on something that is more focused on my heritage, specifically from the eastern province of Saudi Arabia– a statement piece that tells my story.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Relaxed elegance
Buahmad’s personal style speaks volumes. “I like things oversized – white boyfriend shirts and quirky pieces. I’m a sucker for statement boots and sneakers,” she says. “I’m either super casual or dressed up; there’s no room for in-between.” By day, you’ll find her in R13 and Acne Studios tops paired with Moussy and Levi’s jeans. Adding a sentimental touch to her look, Buahmad pulls her mother’s gold chain metal bag and a brown leather belt from the Seventies that belonged to father. Her repertoire of eveningwear is dramatic, uplifting, and bold. “I love pieces by Vivienne Westwood, Maison Margiela, and Junya Watanabe – they are investments and will always stand out. I also have a black dress I’ve owned for more than 10 years that I’m still excited to wear.”
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Scent profile
While scents can take you back to a specific time, sometimes it’s a striking perfume bottle that evokes nostalgia. “I used to love them when I was a kid; Chanel No.5 and this large Nina Ricci bottle with two doves in my mother’s room,” says Buahmad. Today, her vanity mainstays are Le Labo Noir 29, which was first gifted to her by a friend, and Christian Dior Ambre Nuit.
Photographed by Vikram Gawde
Finding Zen
Buahmad is a firm believer in an early morning routine to set the tone for the rest of her day. “I wake up early and try to take time for myself before I jump into work mode. I’ve broken the habit of checking my phone and emails first thing,” she says. “I have some rituals like going to the beach for an hour just to get that energy from the sea,” says the Dubai-based designer. For a refreshing energy boost, Buahmad turns to yin and kundalini yoga. “I like the challenging workout element of it, as well as the calming effect,” she explains. She also finds calmness through shamanic breathwork. “I got into it pre-pandemic. Unfortunately, online sessions didn’t work as well with me, so I’m waiting to go back to big groups as the energy is amazing,” she says.
Green thumb
To find solace, Buahmad retreats to her garden. “It’s personal, I have many memories of gatherings in it, and I’ve watched my plants grow and flourish over time,” she says. Bursting with pink bougainvillea, hibiscus, and fragrant gardenia, her garden is not only an escape where Buahmad finds calm and clarity, it’s also where tends to her vegetable beds. “I’m still an amateur,” she says with a smile. “I have tomatoes, eggplants, melons, cucumbers, and chilis, as well as rosemary, mint, and basil. I have my moments when life feels challenging, but when that happens, I sit back and look around me, at my son, my house, and my garden,” she explains about reflecting in her peaceful oasis. “I think of my family and friends, I think of where I currently am in life, and that as stressful as some phases are or will be, I remind myself that I’m still here and everything will work out.”
Read Next: This Virtual Pop-Up for Arab Designers is Returning for a Second Edition
Hair and mekup: Mirna Abdullah

15 Saudi Women to Follow for Style and Creative Inspiration

15 Saudi Women to Follow for Style and Creative Inspiration

It is no secret that some of the region’s finest talent comes from Saudi Arabia. From actors and models to makeup artists, singers, and more, the Kingdom’s creative ecosystem has nurtured all those looking to represent their country on a global scale. As they share aspects of their life, including their style and work on social media, there has never been a better time to tap into their creativity and get inspired. On Saudi National Day, we round up 15 of such women to follow and keep up with.

Amy RokoComedian
Amy Roko photographed by Sam Rawadi
Saudi humorist Amy Roko has carved out a creative space without ever revealing her face. While doing so, the Jeddah-born has managed with ease what others think about the most controversial piece of clothing out there: the niqab. “I’m aware of the associated stereotypical image of a woman who covers her face as someone who doesn’t talk, who is timid, submissive, muzzled even… I’m offended,” she says. “I’m not timid and I’m not quiet. I’m bold. When I wear the niqab, it’s for me. It’s not because I have to be something or someone. Somehow, I feel better and stronger when I wear it and I have decided that in this life, I’m just going to do me.”
Shahad SalmanModel
Shahad wears top, Samar Nasraldin; skirt, Atelier Hekayat. Photographed by Hayat Osamah for Vogue Arabia June 2021
While she admits getting into modeling “accidentally,” two-time Vogue Arabia cover star Shahad Salman’s growing career is a testament to her unwavering spirit. The Mecca-born model has not let vitiligo slow her down since stepping into the industry, and has featured in a number of campaigns and look books for local designers. “Before, I didn’t feel good about myself and I didn’t like the way I looked,” she says. “Now, I feel that I, too, can inspire other girls from the region.”
Nora Bo AwadhMakeup artist

Garnering more than three million followers on Instagram, makeup artist Nora Bo Awadh has come a long way since the days of her saving up her lunch money to buy an eyeshadow palette. “I started putting makeup on my friends when we would hang out, then I worked a summer job at a local salon and started getting an amazing reputation for my work,” she shares. Her next step was launching her namesake makeup line in 2016. Since then, the brand has expanded with faux lashes, matte lipsticks, makeup sponges, and more. “I was inspired by the beauty of Saudi girls in particular,” she says, “Their eye shape and skin colors are the base of choosing all the colors of my lipsticks, and glitters.”
Nojoud AlrumaihiMarketeer
Nojoud Alrumaihi wearing a Remain outfit with shoes from Sergio Rossi and a S’uvimol bag
Nojoud AlRumaihi is one half of a burgeoning event management company, Upbeat KSA, that she founded with her husband, Abdullah Al Rasheed. The Saudi marketeer holds a degree in business management and marketing from Riyadh’s Al Yamamah University and a master’s in international marketing from London’s King’s Business School. “Understanding people’s psychology, how they behave as consumers, and how everything has an effect on communication, made me want to dive deeper into the field,” she says. Between building a successful startup, being tapped by Christian Dior to front a campaign in her home country, and press trips with Van Cleef & Arpels and Hermès, AlRumaihi is a mother to her three-year old daughter, Lulua.
NjmContent creator
Photo: Abdullah Al Musharraf.
Jeddah content creator Njm says her generation has a stronger voice when it comes to “advocating realness.” “You don’t need to follow specific trends and beauty standards to be cool. I believe the past generation grew up with specific beauty standards and girls struggled to meet them or felt forced to change who they were to fit in.” With millions of followers across her social media channels, she says being true to herself is a priority. “The more genuine you are, the better you are able to connect with others and your audience.”
Rawan KattoaStylist
In a dress by Saloni, heels by Jimmy Choo, and earrings from Shrimps. Photography: Ahmed Salem & Alex Teuscher
Prior to making the big leap into fashion consulting, Saudi stylist Rawan Kattoa started her career in the corporate world. Though the Riyadh native’s roles tapped on talent acquisition, talent development, and youth impact projects when she moved to Jeddah in 2016, it didn’t take long for her to realize that she was destined for something else. “Change has its fair share of resistance. However, in my case, I was grateful to discover my passion at an early age,” Kattoa says. Currently residing in Geneva, she’s certified in editorial and personal styling from the University of the Arts London.
Hayat OsamahPhotographer
Photo: Supplied
The Saudi photographer was born in 1993 in Jeddah, where she lived most of her childhood, then moved to Riyadh where she’s based currently. In 2009 she decided to learn fashion photography on her own when she bought her first “point and shoot” digital camera. Osamah’s vision started taking shape in 2014 when she focused on diversity as a subject using film photography as her way of documentation for its raw perspective. She was selected by the Ministry of Culture as one of the speakers in the first fashion platform Fashion Futures, 2019  in Saudi Arabia. Osamah has worked with major international publications including Vogue and Vogue Arabia.
Yara AlnamlahMakeup artist and blogger
Yara Alnamlah, photographed by Ziga Mihelcic for Vogue Arabia, November 2018
With more than a million followers, the makeup artist and blogger has become a regular in the Middle Eastern beauty set. She started her beauty journey at 16 on Instagram because she wanted to reach a wider audience. “There is beauty throughout the world but, for me, the most inspiring aspect of the industry is the number of strong and successful women,” she says. Alnamlah has worked with royalty and musicians such as Nawal Al Kuwaitia and Assala Nasri, and has also featured in a number of campaigns for brands like Piaget and Jean Paul Gaultier.
CosmicatDJ
Cosmicat
Nouf Sufyani aka Cosmicat is Saudi Arabia’s first female DJ and also known for performing at the Dakar closing ceremony. Born in the 90s and proudly having lived her entire life in Saudi, Sufyani recalls growing up with pop music before shifting towards R&B and hiphop and first began DJing after graduating from dental school. “There’s no such thing as a ‘challenge,’” says Sufyani. “They are mostly little worries that live inside your head until you find a way to overcome them. For me, it was going into a very new field in my country and considering what to do regarding my job as a dentist and coming off as a bit of a social shock–or not being accepted,” she states.
Aram KabbaniStylist
Aram Kabbani wears dress, Swaf Design. Photographed by Greg Adamski for Vogue Arabia March 2020
Stylist to the stars, Aram Kabbani received her bachelor’s degree in graphic design from Dar Al Hekma University in 2008 before embarking on her illustrious career. As one of the first most revered stylists to hail from the Kingdom, Kabbani went on to work with Ameera Al-Taweel, Muna Abu Sulayman, and Ahmed Helmy, among other stars. She is also known to travel around the Middle East as a guest lecturer at fashion schools, speaking at panels, and has hosted events for brands including Tom Ford, Christian Dior, Lanvin, and Carolina Herrera.
Abeer SinderBeauty blogger
Abeer Sinder for the Vogue Arabia x MAC ‘Love Me’ campaign. Photographed by Mann Butte
“I had a message to share,” says Abeer Sinder on becoming the first black beauty vlogger in the Kingdom. “I couldn’t find anyone on social media who represented someone like me in the Arab world.” A longtime champion of self-love and feeling good in your own skin, Sinder has continually used her platform to spread positivity and also highlight crucial issues like racism by sharing her own experiences. “Telling stories has a way to empower and inspire people,” she says. ‘Vulnerability is strength and by telling a story, you can change someone’s life and, in this case, someone’s behavior. What I hope to do is to inspire little black girls to find their self-worth and love themselves from a young age, and for non-black people to be more cautious about their actions and words.”
TamtamSinger
Tamtam photographed by Muhammad Alothman
Tamtam’s soulful voice and powerful vocals paired with her heart-touching songwriting are everything that is helping the musician put Saudi talent on the global map. The artist’s passion for music is palpable and so is her respect for her roots. “My identity absolutely influences my work,” shared the former Vogue Arabia cover star. “I believe music can heal and bring positivity and shed much-needed light on many situations.”
Hessa AlajajiMakeup artist
Hessa Alajaji. Courtesy of Rama Nezam
“I remember the first time I was told my work inspired someone,” begins Hessa Alajaji. “It made me feel like I actually touched people with art. It was humbling yet motivating at the same time.” Born and raised in Riyadh, Alajaji is part of the new generation of makeup artists. “Since it’s a relatively new industry here and growing fast, sometimes it feels like a race but in a good way,” she explains. Her Instagram feed catches your eye instantly. Models showcase clean, glossy skin, a hint of blush, and vivid colors. Experimenting with graphic eyes, she’s not afraid to think out of the box – one post features purple brows and another, yellow eyeshadow with graphic red liner.
Fatima Al-BanawiFilmmaker
The Saudi actor, writer, and filmmaker has graduated from Harvard University with a master’s degree in theological studies, specializing in women, gender, and Islamic studies, and also holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Jeddah’s Effat University. The multi-hyphenate rose to fame in 2016, for her role in Barakah Meets Barakah, and in 2018 was named by Time magazine as a Next Generation Leader, for co-founding The Other Story Project in Saudi Arabia. Most recently, she was named Cartier’s ambassador for the Middle East region.
Reem AlswaidiMakeup artist and entrepreneur
“I always wanted to be an entrepreneur,” says Reem Alswaidi. With a dream of opening her own beauty academy, her first step was becoming a makeup artist. At the time, a French school of hairdressing and makeup, Formul’A Academy, had just opened in Riyadh. For almost four months, Alswaidi studied everything from perfecting everyday skin to editorial makeup. Afterwards, she continued her training with some of the world’s top artists. Traveling between Europe, the US, Dubai, and Egypt, she has worked with people including Scott Barnes and Bassam Fattouh.
Read Next: Saudi Designer Daneh Buahmad Celebrates a Decade Since Her Brand’s Launch

Brabus Says It Has Created the World’s Fastest SUV

Brabus Says It Has Created the World’s Fastest SUV

Brabus may have just stolen the Monaco Yacht Show—with an SUV.

Not just any SUV. The German tuners showed up for the annual marine exhibition with a new ultra-high-performance crossover called the 900 Rocket Edition. And the company claims that the modified vehicle, which is based on the Mercedes-AMG GLE 63S 4MATIC+ Coupe, just happens to be the world’s fastest.

How do you make one of the most capable SUVs on the market even more powerful? If you’re Brabus, you give its engine a ground-up reworking. First, the tuner increased engine displacement from 3,982 cc to 4,407 cc, according to Motor1.com. Then the shop outfitted the mill with larger forged pistons, longer forged piston rods and a billet crankshaft. Other upgrades include turbos with larger compressor units, a new fuel pump and larger downpipes leading into a stainless-steel exhaust system.

Brabus 900 Rocket Edition 

Brabus

Thanks to these modifications, the 900 Rocket Edition’s 4.5-liter twin-turbocharged V-8 can generate a beastly 888 horses and 774 ft lbs of twist, increases of 285 and 147, respectively over AMG’s version. You’ll be able to feel the difference, too. Brabus says its SUV can launch from zero to 62 mph in 3.2 seconds and has an electronically limited top speed of 205 mph. It’s that last figure that Brabus seems to be basing its “world’s fastest” claim on. We imagine Porsche may object, but it’s incredibly fast any way you look at it.

Inside the 900 Rocket Edition 

Brabus

The powertrain isn’t the only aspect of the vehicle that’s been modified. The exterior has been upgraded with a variety of carbon-fiber components, an exposed finish and a set of 24-inch forged wheels with carbon discs. The standard AMG grille has also been swapped out for Brabus’s trademark barred number, which features its medal-style logo in the middle. Inside, the cabin has been touched up with leather, Alcantara and bright red carbon-fiber trim and stitching.
If the idea of an even more extreme GLE 63 S Coupe has gotten you excited, you’ll want to move quick. Brabus will only make 25 example of the 900 Rocket Edition, each of which starts—yes, starts—at $447,322.

Ones to Watch: Antoine Manning

Ones to Watch: Antoine Manning

Antoine Manning, the Atlanta-based accessory designer, is creating pieces that contribute to conversations happening in the world and also look good.
After a fashion internship where Manning gleaned insight into how the industry works, he felt ready to move forward with his own brand. Amidst the pandemic, Manning felt inspired to create something new and sketched out his first bag.
Made from vegan leather, each bag and colorway has a meaning behind it: the green mini bag, which retails for $150, represents tranquility; the orange mini bag, also priced at $150, is meant to evoke vitality, and the lavender classic bag, retailing for $275, is intended to represent abundance.

The bags will be available for purchase on Sept. 24 via the Black Fashion Fair, an online platform that highlights a variety of Black-owned brands. “Twenty percent of the sales go back to helping our communities, something that brings together Black brands and different brands and entities, a powerful statement of what we can do when we stick together,” the designer said.

Antoine Manning abundance classic bag, $275
Courtesy photo

Antoine Manning tranquil minibag, $150
Courtesy photo

Antoine Manning vitality minibag, $150
Courtesy photo

Mercedes-Benz’s Hotly Anticipated EQS EV Will Cost $7,400 Less Than the S-Class

Mercedes-Benz’s Hotly Anticipated EQS EV Will Cost $7,400 Less Than the S-Class

The Mercedes-Benz EQS is full of surprises—not the least of which is its sticker price.

The German automaker announced on Tuesday that its flagship EV will start at $102,310 when it arrives in dealerships later this fall. That it costs more than $100,000 (before a $1,050 destination fee) is unlikely to surprise anyone, but the fact that it will cost less than the gas-powered S-Class certainly will.

It’s rare to see a battery-powered vehicle cost less than its gas-powered equivalent, especially when it’s an EV as hotly anticipated as the EQS. Large battery packs, multi-motor powertrains and complex electric systems often result in a car that costs thousands more than those with traditional internal combustion powertrains. But the difference between the EQS and S-Class essentially reverses that equation. In fact, the starting price for the 2022 EQS is $7,490 less than that of the base model 2022 S-Class, which starts at $109,800.

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580 4MATIC 

Mercedes-Benz

The EQS will debut as two models: the EQS 450+ and the EQS 580 4MATIC. The rear-wheel-drive EQS 450+ has a powertrain that generates 329 hp and 406 ft lbs of torque, can accelerate from zero to 60 mph in 5.5 seconds and has a top speed of 130 mph. Meanwhile, the all-wheel drive EQS 580 4MATIC has an even more potent powertrain that can produce 516 hp and 611 ft lbs of torque, hit 60 mph in just 4.1 seconds and shares the same top speed. (We’re still waiting on an EPA-rated range for both models.) Power isn’t the only difference between the two: the EQS 580 4MATIC’s cabin also features the 56-inch MBUX Hyperscreen infotainment system.

Photo: Courtesy of Mercedes-Benz AG.

Whichever EQS you prefer, it will have three trim levels to choose from. First is the Premium, which starts at that $102,310 base ($119,110 for the EQS 580 4MATIC) and has a laundry list of special features, including a 64-color ambient lighting, a Burmester 3-D Sound System and a hearty driver assistance suite. Then there’s the Exclusive, which starts at $105,710 ($122,510 for the EQS 580 4MATIC) and offers all of those features and four-zone climate control, massaging front seats and a head-up display. Finally, there’s the Pinnacle, which starts at $108,510 ($125,310 for the EQS 580 4MATIC) and adds a center console and more comfortable seating to the rear.
Assuming there are no further supply chain issues, both the 2022 S-Class and EQS will hit the roads this fall. Some fans of Mercedes’s venerable luxury saloon may still be on the fence about going electric, but these prices makes clear that the marque aims to make the electric future as accessible as its gas-powered past.

Mytheresa Debuts Saint Laurent Exclusive Capsule

Mytheresa Debuts Saint Laurent Exclusive Capsule

GREATEST HITS: Mytheresa has just launched an exclusive fall 2021 capsule range with Saint Laurent, building on the brand’s strong sell-throughs on the platform.
The collection offers new interpretations of some of the brand’s greatest hits, including 1960s-inspired Prince of Wales checks and houndstooth patterns, playful minidresses, as well as tailoring, pussy-bow blouses and structured denim, which channel the Parisian bourgeois look the brand is synonymous with.
There also are plenty of accessories like logo bags, dainty gold jewelry and thigh-high boots, but the focus is more skewed to ready-to-wear — a fast-growing category for Mytheresa.

Saint-Laurent x Mytheresa
Courtesy of Mytheresa

“Saint Laurent has always been one of our biggest and most important brands. The bags and accessories have always been the champions of the collection, however, in recent years the rtw became a favorite of our top clients. Many of Anthony Vaccarello’s pieces are sold out the minute they go online,” said Tiffany Hsu, the retailer’s fashion buying director, pointing to  the faux-fur and shearling outerwear in the range as hero pieces. 

To mark the launch, the retailer will introduce a dedicated campaign featuring model Topsy wearing the range against graffiti walls and empty London streets. It was shot by photographer Felix Cooper and produced by the retailer’s chief creative officer Julian Paul.
“To offer our clients something exclusive, which they can only get at Mytheresa, is very important to us as a retailer to differentiate ourselves from others,” added Hsu. 
Prices range from 190 pounds for a choker to 5,225 pounds for a shearling coat.

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