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First Drive: The New Flying Spur Hybrid Is a Harbinger of Bentley’s Future

First Drive: The New Flying Spur Hybrid Is a Harbinger of Bentley’s Future

W.O. Bentley, founder of the eponymous 102-year-old automaker, once proclaimed, “I have always wanted to produce a dead silent 100 mph car, and now I think that we have done it.” He was, of course, referring to the 1930 Bentley 8 Litre at the time, but the comment was more prescient than he could have realized now that the marque has recently climbed the next rung on its ladder to electrification with the 536 hp Bentley Flying Spur Hybrid.

The move to hybridization and, soon, zero-emission vehicles altogether is part of Bentley’s “Beyond 100” plan announced in 2020, which mandates a complete discontinuation of the internal combustion engine (ICE) in the next eight years. The second model in the lineup to go plug-in, following the Bentayga Hybrid, this Flying Spur heralds from a prestigious lineage that began in the 1950s with the Mulliner-dressed S1 Continental Flying Spur initially powered by a 4.9-liter straight-six engine. Subsequent iterations carried a V-8 power plant up until production ended in 1965. With the new century came a new lease on life, and the moniker was reborn in 2005 with a W-12 engine and, later, was completely revised for the 2019 model year.

Bentley’s Flying Spur Hybrid in Azure Purple. 

Photo by James Lipman, courtesy of Bentley Motors Limited.

The backstory puts in context how pivotal this hybrid version, starting at $210,000, is for Bentley’s future direction. Pulling away from the Peninsula Beverly Hills, in Los Angeles, I am more than curious to see how our battery-enhanced Flying Spur, decked in lustrous Azure Purple garb, measures up to a direct competitor like the redesigned Rolls-Royce Ghost or even a lower-price-point sedan like the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. Also of interest is the level of sacrifice in performance, if any, when compared to Bentley’s current ICE-powered lineup.

With its fully charged 1.4 kWh lithium-ion battery and a tank of fuel, the car has nearly a 435-mile range. 

Photo by James Lipman, courtesy of Bentley Motors Limited.

Navigating through the City of Angels and onto the 101 Freeway, the Flying Spur works with the navigation system to nimbly dance between the three E Modes, or battery-management settings, including EV Drive, Hybrid Mode and Hold Mode. During urban sections, EV Drive emphasizes the 134 hp electric motor—given juice by a 1.4 kWh lithium-ion battery—while the Hybrid selection optimizes use of both the latter and V-6 for extended travel without my awareness of any alterations between the two. Its only in Hold Mode, designed to conserve battery charge, say, when in Sport, that the 2.9-liter V-6 becomes dominant. In all, the hybrid configuration is claimed to be good for a nearly 435-mile range.

The hybrid version of the Flying Spur still sports the same sumptuous cabin that earned Robb Report’s Best of the Best accolade for interiors last year. 

Photo by James Lipman, courtesy of Bentley Motors Limited.

But why a V-6? That’s a question I posed to Steve Jones, Bentley’s chief technical engineer for the Continental GT, GTC and Flying Spur. His response was diplomatic while avoiding any acknowledgement of shared platforms within the Volkswagen Group, mentioning that “the only available power train for that particular car is the V-6 PZEV engine.” Jones, however, was candid in what he thought the greatest challenge was with this model variant. “Our customers expect effortless power delivery, and of course that’s easy to do with a W-12 engine that’s capable of 650 bhp and 950 Nm of torque.” He goes on to mention that “the V-6 is obviously a much lower power derivative, but by combining it with the e-motor, we can deliver an equivalent power output as that of our current V-8,” and adds that he’s “particularly proud that we’ve taken a six-cylinder engine and delivered a credible power-train offering.”

The 2.9-liter V-6 and electric motor combine for 536 hp and 553 ft lbs of torque. 

Photo by Kelly Serfoss, courtesy of Bentley Motors Limited.

“Credible” is an accurate descriptor for the overall drive experience, as it’s certainly not incredible, which is close to what is presented by the Bentley Continental GT and Rolls-Royce Black Badge Ghost, in my opinion. Tracing circuitous State Route 150 around Lake Casitas to Ojai, just south of Santa Barbara, I switch from Bentley mode (the comfort setting) to Sport and briefly hammer the throttle to tap into the 553 ft lbs of torque. I’m met with acceleration akin to a winded sprinter straining for the finish line as the engine seemed to grasp for the next gear, at least compared to the Usain Bolt–like Continental.

Exploring one of Malibu’s canyon roads at dusk. 

Photo by James Lipman, courtesy of Bentley Motors Limited.

On the turns, the 5,523-pound (curb weight) all-wheel-drive four-door doesn’t hide its heft as much as expected, and I found that the presence of all-wheel steering is not as immediately apparent as it is with the Mercedes S-Class. Still, the machine covers zero to 60 mph in 4.1 seconds and tops out at 177 mph, certainly no slouch. It’s not that engineering is lacking, far from it. The chassis benefits from double-wishbone suspension at the front and a multi-link setup at the rear, along with three-chamber air springs that are claimed to provide 60 percent more volume than before. And stopping prowess is owed to what Bentley touts as “the largest iron brakes in the world” at 16.5 inches in diameter. The bottom line seems to be that the Flying Spur Hybrid lacks enough muscle for its mass. It’s like a thoroughbred foal, the impressive shape and potential for athleticism is evident, it just hasn’t fully come into its own yet.

The all-wheel-drive four-door has a curb weight of 5,523 pounds. 

Photo by James Lipman, courtesy of Bentley Motors Limited.

As to aesthetics, though, the model certainly belongs in the winner’s circle. The wheelbase’s 5.11-inch extension and our example’s optional 22-inch wheels (in Mulliner spec) add to the gravitas of both the car’s silhouette and stance, as does the newly illuminated Flying B hood ornament. But to be expected, it’s the Flying Spur’s interior that truly charges the senses, which is why it was named Robb Report’s Best of the Best in that category last year. From unseen details like the knurled surface treatment behind the door handles to the innovative rotating dashboard display to the 3-D diamond-quilted door and panel inserts, the hybrid still has it all.

Our Azure Purple example’s inner sanctum is defined by Damson and Porpoise leather as well as 3-D diamond-quilted upholstery and paneling. 

Photo by James Lipman, courtesy of Bentley Motors Limited.

When asked what he anticipates the demand will be for the Flying Spur Hybrid in relation to the US market, Christophe Georges, president and CEO of Bentley Americas, answers pragmatically. “Hybrid in America, for Bentley, is obviously quite new,” he notes. “They [customers] need to try it, to test it, and then we will be able to assess what will be the share. But if you look at the overall market for hybrid, it has developed considerably last year in America, so we should see the same kind of development happen with us; maybe it’s not the same proportions, but we’ll see.”

Pricing for the model variant starts at $210,000. 

Photo by James Lipman, courtesy of Bentley Motors Limited.

After spending time behind the wheel, I find Georges’ expectations to be realistically tempered. The Flying Spur Hybrid, while offering as baronial a passenger experience as any Bentley, is nonetheless a beautifully appointed stopgap. But perhaps such interim status is where its true value lies—a promising future collectible poised to mark the most important transformation in automotive history.

Stripe It Up: The New Spring/Summer 2022 Trend That Has Everyone’s Attention

Stripe It Up: The New Spring/Summer 2022 Trend That Has Everyone’s Attention

Brandon Maxwell. Photo: Vogue Runway
Rebellious and emblematic, stripes come with a lot of connotations, but that has never stopped designers from using the classic print. Well known for his explicit and humorous designs, Jean Paul Gautier was one of the first designers to work with the famous blue and white Breton stripes in his sailor-inspired collection during back in the ’90s, and there’s been no looking back since.
This season, fashion decided to shake things up with stripes once again, proving that you can never have too much of a good thing. Scrolling through the spring/summer 2022 collections, we noticed that the famed print was dominating the runway once again. Stripes were the main attraction for several designers, and they didn’t hold back, playing with different colors, textures, and sizes for maximum impact.
Caroline Herrera. Photo: Vogue Runway
Instead of the trademark blue and white, Brandon Maxwell sent thick green and orange stripes out on his runway, while Carolina Herrera switched things up by rendering the lines vertically, keeping her gown simple, yet impactful in a palette of black and white. Likewise, we spotted Balmain nailing the same theme by draping an oversized piece as a summer-ready dress. On the other hand, Saint Laurent decided to go extremely traditional with a basic buttoned-up shirt with front pockets on both sides.
Balmain. Photo: Vogue Runway
This season, Armani also had its go at stripes with a maxi dress in red and blue. Other brands such as Chanel, Christian Siriano and Chloe chose unexpected effects to experiment with the pattern. While Chanel shook basic stripes up and went with zig-zags instead, Chloe presented a fringed multicolored dress and Christian Siriano varied the stripes between horizontal and vertical.
Chanel. Photo: Vogue Runway
There is no limit to what one can do with a striped pattern, and these designers, without a doubt, proved it on the runway. Take a look at some of their coolest renditions from the season.
Chloe. Photo: Vogue Runway

Emporio Armani. Photo: Vogue Runway
Saint Laurent. Photo: Vogue Runway
Christian Siriano. Photo: Vogue Runway

Karen Wazen Becomes the First Middle Eastern To Front a Global Campaign for Roberto Cavalli

Karen Wazen Becomes the First Middle Eastern To Front a Global Campaign for Roberto Cavalli

Karen Wazen. Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli
Influencer and entrepreneur Karen Wazen is officially the first Middle Eastern to be the face of a global Roberto Cavalli campaign. The Lebanese-born, Dubai-based mother-of-three was recently seen in a series of stills for the Italian fashion house. The campaign, which celebrates Roberto Cavalli’s fragrances—the Paradiso perfume, in particular—shows a glowing Wazen dressed in the label’s signature animal print essentials against an equally rustic series of backdrops inspired by wildlife patterns.
All set to be officially unveiled in February, the campaign was reportedly shot in Paris earlier this year. In an official statement, Fausto Puglisi, creative director of Roberto Cavalli, shared, “We are extremely excited to welcome Karen to the Cavalli family. Her liberated spirit and glamorous style embodies the iconic Cavalli universe. We are proud to kickstart our collaboration together with a campaign that celebrates the core Cavalli fragrance pillars, which are the epitome of femininity and bring together a melody of notes inspired by out Italian heritage.” This campaign also marks the first time the fashion house has featured an influencer in its campaign.
Wazen too shared her excitement about the project with her 7.1 million Instagram followers, saying, “This is such a dream for an Arab girl from Lebanon to be the global spokesperson for such an iconic brand… thank you to the most amazing team for this opportunity and for an unforgettable experience.”

In the shots, Wazen gazes at the camera with flawlessly painted cat eyes, while the rest of her beauty look is refreshingly stripped back. Think barely-there base makeup that allows freckles and natural textures to shine through, soft caramel lips, and easy, straight locks. The only indulgent beauty element you’ll spot here is that molten gold manicure, which brings in some of Cavalli’s trademark drama.
Along with being a special moment for the brand, the Roberto Cavalli campaign is another feather in Karen Wazen’s cap, who also launched her very own eyewear brand in 2018, and a game named ‘Karen Wazen: My World’ last year. Scroll to check out more pictures from the campaign!
Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli
Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli
Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli
Photo: Courtesy Roberto Cavalli

Chanel Unveils a Celestial Masterpiece to Celebrate 90 Years Since Coco’s First (and Only) High Jewelry Collection

Chanel Unveils a Celestial Masterpiece to Celebrate 90 Years Since Coco’s First (and Only) High Jewelry Collection

Coco Chanel. Photo: Getty
Today, Chanel unveils a glimpse of its new high jewelry collection for 2022, and it’s one that quite literally reaches for the stars. The centrepiece of the 1932 collection, which celebrates 90 years since Bijoux De Diamants, its founder’s historic and one and only high jewelry collection, is the Allure Céleste. This magnificently modern sapphire and diamond necklace was inspired by the same celestial theme that spurred Gabrielle Chanel’s own creations. “I wanted to cover women in constellations,” said the designer when her collection was unveiled at her private apartment at 29 rue du Faubourg de Saint-Honoré, on November 5, 1932.
The Allure Céleste is the starry centrepiece of the 1932 collection. It can be worn in a number of ways including as a short necklace, three brooches and as a bracelet.
Patrice Leguéreau, director of the Chanel jewelry creation studio today, says he wanted 1932, which will launch fully in May, to pay homage to the audacity and wearability of Coco’s Bijoux de Diamants – which eschewed clasps and fuss in favor of bold, transformable pieces in a palette of diamonds and platinum – and at the same time move the conversation forward. “I wanted to create a different vision of this legacy, by setting these celestial elements in motion,” he explains.
In the Allure Céleste, the movement and light that emanates from the night sky is captured in shimmering halos of diamonds that radiate out from each motif. A crescent moon cradles a 55.55 carat (naturellement, five being Coco’s favorite number), intense blue sapphire, while a comet centres on an 8.02 carat pear-shaped diamond, its fiery tail coming alive in gradated lines of diamonds in assorted cuts.
Coco Chanel pictured here in 1937. Photo: Getty
Coco herself was as renowned for her contradictions as she was for her style and her sharp wit. She once proclaimed she favored costume jewelry over fine jewelry, because she found it “disgraceful to walk around with millions of dollars around your neck, just because you are rich”. Under her direction in the 1920s, costume jewelry became no longer a mere imitation of the “real thing”. She helped establish it as an art form in its own right, whether in commissioning the magnificently opulent Maltese cross cuffs from her friend Duke Fulco di Verdura, or in her elegant tumbles of long pearl necklaces layered over a little black dress.
A shooting star necklace from Chanel’s 1932 Bijoux de Diamants collection.
She was prompted by the Great Depression however to revisit her thoughts around precious jewels. The Wall Street crash of 1929 had a calamitous effect on the entire world, as people and businesses found themselves in ruin. In typically bombastic style, her dislike of ostentation and high-value gems was turned on its head. “This aspect fades in times of financial crisis, when an instinctive need for authenticity in all matters returns, reducing an amusing bauble to its actual worth,” she said in the press kit for the Bijoux de Diamants collection. “If I have chosen diamonds, it is because they represent the greatest value in the smallest volume.”
The cover of Vogue Paris, January 1933, in which the collection was reviewed.
The collection was financed by the London Diamond Corporation, who hoped that Chanel’s creative talents might kickstart renewed energy in the market following several years in the doldrums. Their gamble paid off. Following the two-week exhibition, which was visited by the great and good of the Parisian creative scene, including Pablo Picasso, Gloria Swanson, Condé Nast and star dancers from the Ballets Russes, shares in the company rose and a new buzz around diamonds and precious jewelry was achieved. As Coco herself said, “Nothing could be better for forgetting the crisis than feasting one’s eyes on beautiful new things, which the skills of our craftsmen and women never cease to unveil.”
In customary fearless style, Chanel chose to display her creations on wax busts rather than on jewelers’ trays. With the help of friends including artist Paul Iribe, who designed the jewelry, the poet Jean Cocteau who wrote the collection manifesto, and Robert Bresson (later a celebrated film director), who photographed it, she created a unique collection that above all was focused on the female body and how jewelry should work to enhance it, not hinder it. “In a world that was deeply masculine, Gabrielle Chanel was a woman who designed for women. In her view jewelry should be an idea, not a status symbol of the men who bought it for the women in their lives,” says Marianne Etchebarne, Chanel’s global head of watches and fine jewelry product marketing, clients, and communication.
Robert Bresson’s images of the Bijoux de Diamants exhibition appeared in Vogue Paris, January 1933.
Just as she created fashion that offered women new freedom and flexibility in their clothes, a star brooch could be worn in the hair or on a lapel. A comet caressed the neck, its tail of diamonds flattering the wearer’s décolletage. She focused on the motifs that made up her world, from supple couture ribbons of diamonds to the mosaic floors of the Aubazine abbey where she was raised that detailed the sun, the moon and five-point stars.  “It caused a sensation at the time and still today it remains the cornerstone of our jewelry designs,” says Etchebarne.
“My stars! How could anything be more becoming or more eternally modern?” Gabrielle Chanel.
But the collection was not without controversy. Paris’s traditional jewelry houses were outraged that a mere couturière — a dressmaker —  and a woman to boot, had been tasked with creating a high jewelry collection in the hope of reinvigorating the diamond market, and they demanded that the corporation close the project down. The corporation persisted but its plans to bring Bijoux de Diamants to London never materialized, and most of the pieces were broken up, never to be seen again. Little did those Parisian jewelers know that the collection’s legacy – and Coco’s vision – would live on, and still be inspiring the world today.
Read Next: 9 Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel Quotes to Live By
Originally published on Vogue.co.uk

Nemer Saade’s Latest Collection is an 80s-Inspired Celebration of Togetherness

Nemer Saade’s Latest Collection is an 80s-Inspired Celebration of Togetherness

Photo: Nader Moussally
As we move ahead with the new normal, nostalgia for the decades gone by remains strong, and any chance to honor that time must not be missed. Lebanese designer Nemer Saade is of the same mind, as he harkens back to the joyful 80s for the latest collection of his eponymous brand.
The strong silhouettes and bold fabrics synonymous with the era collide in Nemer Saade FW22, bursting with color while being rooted in elegance. Pieces form the designer’s response to a fast-paced post-isolation time, where togetherness is celebrated as a way of slowing down and taking stock of life. To that end, the femininity and masculinity in the designs of both genders are dialed up, sometimes blurring the line between the two in a “homage to the fun and combative spirit of men and women.” Think, a grey leather jacket for women, and a hot pink suit for men, with both equally capable of sparking confidence within the wearer.
The collection’s color palette features neutrals like beige, cream, and grey with pops of purple, yellow, and blue. The designer also taps the winning color combination of bright pink and red, offering it in the form of a suit that can take you from day to night. A desert-colored cashmere wool coat is the highlight in the women’s collection, featuring Swarovski crystal-encrusted embroidery on the sleeves.
The Beirut-based label has been worn by many regional stars including singer Ragheb Alama, actor Nadine Nassib Njeim, and more recently, Nadine Labaki. The Lebanese actor-director wore a black suit by the designer to the Dubai premiere of her new Netflix film, Perfect Strangers.
Take a look at some of the key pieces from the collection below.
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Photo: Nader Moussally
Read Next: Mona Zaki Wore a Romantic Black Velvet Gown by an Arab Designer for the Premiere of Netflix’s Perfect Strangers

Bella Hadid Accessorized Her Backless Brown Dress With a Custom ‘Palestine’ Necklace

Bella Hadid Accessorized Her Backless Brown Dress With a Custom ‘Palestine’ Necklace

Photo: Instagram.com/chvkerjewelry
As a model who frequently champions her Palestinian heritage, it’s natural that Bella Hadid does so sartorially too. The part-Arab daughter of real estate developer Mohamed Hadid, known for actively advocating her support for Palestine, was recently spotted wearing its name around her neck. While out in West Hollywood with her brother Anwar Hadid, and friends including Euphoria star Alexa Demie, the model accessorized her look with gold necklaces that read ‘Palestine’, and her full name, ‘Isabella’.

These are not just necklaces bought off-the-shelf, but custom pieces created on Hadid’s request by Chvker Jewelry’s designer Nazlia Yunus. She revealed that Hadid commissioned her to design around eight bespoke nameplate necklaces in gold, reading:  ‘Pizza Queen’, ‘Libra Angel’, ‘Hellz Bellz’, ‘Baby Bellz’, ‘Bella Hadid’, and her middle name, ‘Khair’. Chvker Jewelry is known for its trendy Y2K pieces, in line with the 25-year-old model’s current style. In fact, Hadid is not the only popular name the brand has found a fan in. Yunus’ designs have also been spotted on Demie, beauty mogul Kylie Jenner, Stranger Things actor Millie Bobby Brown, and rapper Becky G.

Hadid complemented her necklaces with a pair of classic oversized golden hoops. Her outfit of choice for attending artist Alana O’Herlihy’s birthday at The Nice Guy restaurant consisted of a brown backless halter dress with a plunging neckline and a high-low neckline, and white knee-high leather boots. She completed her look with a leopard print purse slung over her shoulder, and wore her hair in a messy bun with a side fringe, which has fast become her signature hairstyle.
Read Next: Bella Hadid’s Love for Palestine Has Now Been Preserved Through This Painting

Balenciaga’s Demna Opens Up About Facing Discrimination at a Paris Restaurant Because of His Clothing

Balenciaga’s Demna Opens Up About Facing Discrimination at a Paris Restaurant Because of His Clothing

Demna-Balenciaga-featured
Creative director of Balenciaga and co-founder of Vetements, Demna, has never shied away from speaking his mind on his social media platform. After all, it’s honesty that creates a sense of community online, isn’t it? If you follow the designer’s Instagram handle, @demnagram, you may already be familiar with his daily musings, which touch upon his most candid thoughts, from the reason he hates the word ‘glamour’ to what ‘couture’ really means to him.
Demna’s latest post touches upon discrimination, and the designer highlighted the issue with a personal story that took place recently, where he was denied entry into a Paris restaurant on account of his attire. “People are sometimes scared of my look, my silhouette. They judge me on that because they’re not able to categorize me,” Demna shared in a post yesterday. Speaking about the spot he was trying to enter for a meal, he shared, “I never really go to those ‘chic’ places – I mostly cook at home – and they didn’t want to let me in because of the way I was dressed. They were like, ‘Chez nous, c’est pas possible!’ I was like [incredulous], ‘Pardon?’ I was wearing Head-to-toe Balenciaga! Had the other person I was with not said, ‘It’s OK; he’s with us’, they wouldn’t have let me in.”
Musing about the episode, Demna also spoke about often feeling like the odd one out, and how he plans to use his talents in the fashion field to help others like him change this narrative. “That’s the story of my life – I don’t fit in. People who go to ‘chic’ places like that don’t have the freedom to look the way they want and I think my career will always be dedicated to proving the opposite.” Because at the end of the day, each of us should have the free will to dress as we please, regardless of labels and social standing. “Unless they know who I am – Demna, creative director at Balenciaga – they won’t let me in. But the moment they know that, the way I choose to look suddenly becomes acceptable. That’s what’s so unfair. I hate that, and I don’t want to be a part of it. I’ll never be hungry enough to have to wear a tuxedo to eat. I’d be happier going to McDonalds wearing my rubber boots. That is my aspirational lifestyle – just to be who I am.”

André Leon Talley Has Passed Away at 73

André Leon Talley Has Passed Away at 73

André Leon Talley at an event in New York in 2020. Photo: Getty
Fashion icon André Leon Talley has died at the age of 73. According to reports, the fashion writer and former Vogue creative director was in the hospital due to an undisclosed illness.
Upon the news of his demise going public, several noteworthy names from the fashion industry were quick to share heartbreaking reactions of online. Among them was designer Diane von Furstenberg, model Amber Valletta and Coco Rocha.
After years at Vogue, where he became Anna Wintour‘s right hand, André Leon Talley joined the W Magazine family in Paris in 1995. His relationship with Vogue, however, was a special one, and drew him back in 1998 in the position of the magazine’s editor-at-large, which he maintained for the next five years. Over the years, Talley’s eye and understanding of fashion made him a name to follow across the world, and his mark on the industry will remain for generations. Below, a look at some of the messages shared in response to the news of his death.

Dustin Hoffman Is Auctioning Off the 1949 Buick Roadmaster From ‘Rain Man’

Dustin Hoffman Is Auctioning Off the 1949 Buick Roadmaster From ‘Rain Man’

One of the more famous vehicles to grace the silver screen could soon be yours in real life.

The 1949 Buick Roadmaster convertible from Rain Man will hit the block later this month at Bonhams’s Scottsdale Auction. Movie cars hit the market all the time, this marks the first time the beautiful roadster has been available since Dustin Hoffman acquired it after filming.

Rain Man—which won Oscars for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay in 1989—tells the story of two brothers, Charlie (played by Tom Cruise) and Raymond (Hoffman), who couldn’t be more different from one another and only get to know each other after a cross country road trip. Charlie is a selfish schemer who only finds out about Raymond, after his estranged father dies and leaves all of his fortune, except the Roadmaster, to Raymond, an autistic savant. In an attempt gain control of the fortune, Charlie decides to bring Raymond to live with him, but since the latter refuses to fly, the duo is forced to drive from Cincinnati to California in the convertible.

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This Roadmaster is one of two used during filming. It’s finished in Sequoia Cream accented with lots of chrome and features a red leather interior and tan convertible top. Under its hood, you’ll find a brawny 5.24-liter inline eight, which is mated to a two-speed Dynaflow automatic transmission and is capable of generating 150 hp, according to the listing. Other features include an independent front suspension and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes.
The gorgeous drop-top was acquired by Hoffman in 1988, shortly after the Barry Levinson-directed film finished shooting. The car, which was fully restored by Larry Payne, has been in the actor’s possession ever since, rarely making an appearance in public. It would seem that Hoffman is ready for that to change, though.

Inside the “Rain Man” Roadmaster convertible 

Bonhams

“The Buick’s been in storage too long,” he said in a statement. “It should be driven, enjoyed and cherished.”
The Rain Man Roadmaster will go up for bid on Thursday, January 27 at the Westin Kierland Resort and Spa in Scottsdale. Bonhams expects the car to sell for between $150,000 and $250,000. That’s a lot more than the $3,150 the car originally sold for, but also might be a bargain for a true piece of movie history.
Check out more images of the Rain Man Roadmaster below:

Bonhams

Bonhams

Porsche’s New Platinum Edition Cayenne Brings Silver Style to the SUV

Porsche’s New Platinum Edition Cayenne Brings Silver Style to the SUV

The Porsche Cayenne is certainly not short on style, but the folks at Stuttgart have decided to gussy it up a bit.

Meet the new 2022 Cayenne Platinum Edition, a glitzy new variant arriving in US dealerships this summer that will features exclusive design elements dripping in—you guessed it—Platinum paint.
The striking SUV promises to stand out from the rest of the Cayennes—and that’s no small feat. The Cayenne is the second most popular Porsche after the Macan, with some 83,071 models sold in 2021.

As the name implies, the Cayenne Platinum Edition sports Platinum accents. 

Porsche

Platinum Editions of the Cayenne, Cayenne E-Hybrid and Cayenne S will be offered alongside the respective coupé variants. As the moniker would suggest, details such as the intake slats, the Porsche letting on the rear LED taillight and the model designation badge on the back are covered in satin-finish Platinum. Elsewhere, the 21-inch RS Spyder Design wheels, which are exclusive to this special edition, sport the same silver hue.
All that platinum is complemented nicely by black tailpipes and window trim accents. The body is also available in an array of different colorways. In addition to solid black and white, there are a number of metallic tones, such as Jet Black, Carrara White, Mahogany and Moonlight Blue. There’s also a special color called Chalk (or Crayon if you’re in Europe) that absorbs ambient light to look like a mix of white, silver and gray.

The Cayenne features silver cabin trims to match the exterior. 

Porsche

Inside, meanwhile, you can expect silver cabin trims, Chalk-colored seat belts and brushed aluminum door sills with the “Platinum Edition” logo, as well as Porsche crests on the front and rear headrests. The Platinum Edition also comes with extended equipment as standard, which means you’ll get LED headlights with the Porsche Dynamic Light System, the panoramic roof and privacy glass, a Bose sound system, ambient lighting, eight-way leather sport seats and an analog clock on the dash. Of course, the interior and exterior can be customized further with Porsche Manufaktur.
The Cayenne and Cayenne Coupé start at $79,000 and $83,000, respectively, while the Cayenne S will set you back $93,400 and the Cayenne Coupé $95,600. The Cayenne E-Hybrid, meanwhile, starts at $92,700 and the Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupé $93,800. You’ll also have to shell out $1,350 for the delivery and handling fees. Hey, that’s a small price to pay to stand out.

Check out more photos below:

Porsche

Porsche

Porsche

Porsche

Porsche

Porsche

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