Zanini RTW Spring 2022

Zanini RTW Spring 2022

Marco Zanini has a profound knowledge of the fashion industry and he is fully aware that to grow his Zanini line, presenting its sixth collection this September, he needs financial support. “It’s definitely time to find a partner,” said the designer, while showing his spring 2022 lineup, as sophisticated and chic as usual.
The look: Zanini updated his signature sober and discreet elegance with more playful touches. Upscale natural fabrics with textures continued to take center stage in this refined lineup for women who want to look impeccable and unique, including during their spare time.

Quote of note: “The process here is very different, it’s about trying to really understand the needs of my clients and my final consumers. It’s not about the bold look for the catwalk, it’s about the small details that make each piece appealing for women living a real life.”
Key pieces: A cotton and silk shirt, printed with a hand-drawn motif of straw baskets, tucked into linen pleated short pants; a relaxed striped suit featuring baggy pants with a drawstring waist; a feminine, flared shirtdress decorated with a floral pattern, and a navy blue jumpsuit blending sartorial details with workwear.

Takeaway: In today’s market, that is becoming more and more challenging for niche brands, Zanini has certainly all the right credentials to succeed at growing in an organic way, without loosing its signature exclusivity.

This 5-Move Core Workout for Runners Will Help Your Miles Feel Easier

This 5-Move Core Workout for Runners Will Help Your Miles Feel Easier

Strong legs are (obviously) important for running. But so is the entire midsection of your body—which is why we have a great core workout for runners that you can easily add to your routine.First though, let’s get clear on what we mean by “core.” While you may think of “core” as simply your abs, there are also a bunch of other muscles involved, too.Your core is “all of the muscles that control your torso,” certified strength and conditioning specialist Janet Hamilton, C.S.C.S., an exercise physiologist and running coach with Running Strong in Atlanta, tells SELF. This includes your rectus abdominis (which run vertically along the front of your abdomen), obliques (muscles on the sides of your torso), and transverse abdominis (the deepest core muscles that sits beneath your obliques) as well as your glutes, pelvic floor, and the muscles that stabilize your spine and hips.When it comes to running, your core has two big jobs. The first is reducing your injury risk. And the second is improving performance.On the injury front, a strong core may help reduce your chances of common runner ailments, like patellofemoral syndrome (often called runner’s knee), Iliotibial band syndrome, plantar fasciitis, shin splints, and stress fractures, says Hamilton. That’s because movement in one part of your body can affect movement in another area. Say, for example, your foot rolls too far inward as you run (an issue known as overpronation). That excess motion can travel upward to your knees and potentially overstress the knee joint.But, if you have strong enough hips—which, as we mentioned above, are actually part of your core—then they can absorb some of that force and reduce your risk of knee injury.A strong core can also help you run better, since the power that your legs generate from running needs to be transmitted through your core. The stronger your core is, the more effectively that power will be transmitted, and the more efficiently you’ll be able to propel yourself forward.“A good strong core is vital to performance,” says Hamilton.Moreover, the base of your power as a runner is your glutes (yep, which are also part of your core), she says. So by improving your glute strength, you can in turn improve your power as a runner. That’s why when you’re thinking of a solid core workout for runners, you shouldn’t think only about traditional abs exercises—moves that strengthen your glutes are also key.In this core workout for runners, which was created by Hamilton, you’ll work your glutes as well as your hips, obliques, abs, and back. Because you’ll ease into this routine, you don’t need a specific warm-up beforehand. But if you’d like, feel free to do some gentle movement, like walking, says Hamilton.As for when and how often runners should pencil in core work like this, ​​well, there’s no set guidance. However, as a general rule of thumb, Hamilton suggests strength training two to three times a week. This can either be on days when you’re not running at all, or days when you have just an easy run planned.Feeling ready to fire up your core and improve your running in the process? Keep scrolling for a core workout for runners you’ll want to come back to each week.The WorkoutWhat you need: An exercise mat for comfort.ExercisesForearm plankSide plankGlute bridgeBird dogSpeed skaterDirectionsPerform each exercise for the designated time or number of reps, then move onto the next exercise, resting as prescribed. Do the entire sequence 1 or 2 times.Demoing the moves below are Nikki Pebbles (GIFs 1 and 3), a New York City–based fitness instructor; Crystal Williams (GIF 2), a group fitness instructor and trainer who teaches at residential and commercial gyms across New York City; Rachel Denis (GIF 4), a powerlifter who competes with USA Powerlifting and holds multiple New York State powerlifting records; and Amanda Wheeler (GIF 5), a certified strength and conditioning specialist and co-founder of Formation Strength.

Versace RTW Spring 2022

Versace RTW Spring 2022

Celebrities and supermodels, prints and crystal mesh, foulards and safety pins — and a a big dose of fun. All the ingredients of the signature explosive Versace formula were there on Friday night when the fashion house returned to the physical format with a flamboyant show.To the tune of her retro pop hit “Physical,” British music star Dua Lipa, the face of Versace’s fall 2021 advertising campaign, made her catwalk debut walking the runway twice: she opened the show in a black skirt suit with slits kept closed by multicolor safety pins and she closed it — and took the final bow with Versace — in a hot pink crystal mesh set.

She was not the only notable on the runway. Along with the most-requested models, Gigi Hadid included, the cast featured Emily Ratajkowski; Naomi Campbell, – her statuesque beauty exalted by a mannish suit in a bold pink tone – and Madonna’s daughter Lourdes Leon Ciccone, wrapped in a silver crystal mesh gown.

On the catwalk, which featured a roof created with silk foulards that were waved by shirtless perfectly abbed models rhythmically pulling black ropes, Versace unveiled a rich, big co-ed collection true to the brand’s heritage.

The brand’s iconic safety pins made a playful comeback in brightly colored variations that peppered several black dresses and separates with slits, vertical cuts and cut outs. Foulards stole the spotlight. Splashed with vibrant patterns, they were not only used as accessories but became an integral part of the pieces, for example as inserts in a denim mini frock, peeping out from the edges of a sexy vinyl bustier dress or from the waist of a pair of classic fluid pants in a deep burgundy tone paired with a matching coat and a logo T-shirt.

“The foulard is a fundamental component of Versace’s heritage and character. It’s acted as a canvas for our iconic prints and is worn in multiple ways from knotted tops to headscarves to bag accessories, it’s a way of adding Versace attitude to any look,” said  Versace chief creative officer Donatella Versace. “The foulard has been with us since the very beginning of the brand, but this season turns everything on its head, it is no longer fluid or dreamy, the scarf is provocative, sexy, wound tight.”

Vivid colors, from sorbet shades to neon hues, added an energetic boost to the show’s flamboyant vibe, underscored by maxi floral and geometric patterns, as well as logos – especially on the men’s pieces, which had a varsity, sporty vibe, or on the knit sweaters and vests enriched with an intarsia Versace crest.

There was lots going on here, but the joyous collection, which included a lineup of unapologetically sensual evening options, was a strategically studied and commercially savvy take on Versace’s iconic exuberance that  should keep its parent Capri Holdings happy.

This Street-Legal Porsche Prototype Started Life as a Le Mans-Grade Race Car. Now It Can Be Yours.

This Street-Legal Porsche Prototype Started Life as a Le Mans-Grade Race Car. Now It Can Be Yours.

You could soon own a street-legal version of the car that helped Porsche own endurance racing during the ‘80s and early ‘90s.

An ultra-rare 1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62 was just listed for sale on Issimi. The outrageous-looking speed machine may not be in mint condition, but it’s hard to think of a better car in which to recreate the feeling of racing at Le Mans.

Porsche racers took home the top prize at the 24 Hours of Le Mans every year from 1981 and 1987. Much of this dominance can be traced to two cars, the 956 and its successor, the 962. Although the 962 didn’t take home as many checkered flags at the race as its predecessor (the 956 was responsible for four wins, and the 962 claimed two), it was a genuine force until rule changes brought its time to an end. With its racing days behind it, Porsche let a handful of companies, including Koenig, convert the remaining 962 prototypes for street use.

Issimi

Koening, the German tuner, has a tendency to take a high-performance vehicle like the Ferrari Testarosa and make it even more extreme. And sure enough, that’s exactly what the shop did with the C62. Although it looks identical to the race car, it was completely re-engineered for street driving and to meet German government regulations, according to the listing. In fact, there is not a single shared body panel between the two vehicles.

Inside the Porsche Koenig Specials C62 

Issimi

Underneath the C62’s rear-positioned engine lid, you’ll find a 3.4-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six. That mill is mated to a five-speed manual transmission that sends power to the rear axle and can generate 550 hp, a number that was verified as recently as 2019. The car’s suspension has been completely redone and fitted with softer springs and dampers, while its racing-style brakes now feature more street-oriented pads.

1991 Porsche Koenig Specials C62 

Issimi

Koenig had dreams of building 30 C62s, but only ended up producing three, of which this is the second. Since being completed in 1992, it’s spent much of its time in Japan, where it passed through a number of collector’s hands. Its current owner purchased it in 2019 and had it imported to the US. It’s been well-maintained and has just 1,555 miles on the odometer but, as Jalopnik points out, its body hasn’t been restored, which means there are some signs of wear and tear, like scrapes and chips.

Issimi

Most surprising of all about this listing is the price tag: $995,000. While certainly not accessible, it’s less than the $1,030,000 the car cost brand new (which would be over $2 million in today’s money). It’s hard to call a car with a high-six-figure sticker price a bargain, but this actually might be just that.

Linda Evangelista Claims This Popular Cosmetic Procedure Left Her ‘Brutally Disfigured’

Linda Evangelista Claims This Popular Cosmetic Procedure Left Her ‘Brutally Disfigured’

Supermodel Linda Evangelista says that CoolSculpting, a popular cosmetic procedure, did the opposite of what it claimed to do—and left her “permanently deformed.” In an Instagram post, Evangelista revealed new details about what happened and announced she is suing the company behind CoolSculpting.“Today I took a big step towards righting a wrong that I have suffered and kept to myself for over five years. To my followers who have wondered why I have not been working while my peers’ careers have been thriving, the reason is that I was brutally disfigured by Zeltiq’s CoolSculpting procedure which did the opposite of what it promised,” Evangelista wrote in the post. “It increased, not decreased, my fat cells and left me permanently deformed even after undergoing two painful, unsuccessful corrective surgeries. I have been left, as the media described, ‘unrecognizable.’”She went on to explain that she developed paradoxical adipose hyperplasia (PAH), “a risk of which I was not made aware before I had the procedures.” PAH has destroyed her livelihood, Evangelista wrote, but it has also “sent me into a cycle of deep depression, profound sadness, and the lowest depths of self-loathing. In the process, I have become a recluse.” Evangelista filed a $50 million lawsuit in New York federal court this week seeking damages for emotional distress and lost wages due to negligence on the part of CoolSculpting maker Zeltiq Aesthetics, CNN reported. She has reportedly not earned anything as a model since 2016 due to the effects of the procedure.CoolSculpting is a nonsurgical fat-reduction procedure that works by freezing fat cells, which the body then eliminates through waste. The procedure may be an attractive option to consumers because it requires no downtime and allows for a targeted approach, the Mayo Clinic explains. Some common side effects of CoolSculpting can include discomfort during the procedure (such as tugging, numbness, or pinching), as well as temporary numbness, swelling, redness, bruising, and stinging after the treatment, the Mayo Clinic says.But PAH is another possible side effect of the procedure, which occurs when fat tissue accumulates in a particular area. It’s characterized by “the formation of a large, painless, firm, partially mobile mass that develops at the treatment site,” researchers write in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal.Although it’s rare, recent research suggests PAH may be more common than researchers originally thought. Looking at 16 reports of PAH after cryolipolysis (the technical term for the CoolSculpting procedure), researchers in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology argue that, “the continuing popularity and high volume of cryolipolysis procedures performed may suggest that PAH may not be a ‘rare’ adverse effect.” 

17 Holy Grail Supportive Sports Bras That SELF Editors Swear By

17 Holy Grail Supportive Sports Bras That SELF Editors Swear By

They pick us up when we’re down, hug us tight, and support us through every challenge. Yep, we’re talking about sports bras. When looking for supportive sports bras, there are a few things to keep in mind: First, consider the actual amount of support you need, which varies based on your activity, and your breast size. Second, take note of the strap style (pro tip: bigger-busted folks should look for thicker straps) and how easy the bra is to pull on and off. For further guidance, glance over our sports bra buying guide. Once you’ve found a supportive sports bra that truly fits, you may be surprised by how much easier workouts become. Your boobs will no longer bounce, and you won’t be left adjusting your bra after every rep and dealing with persistent back pain. The best supportive sports bra is so comfortable you won’t feel like you’re wearing a bra at all.Here at SELF, we spend a lot of time testing various fitness products and activewear (especially for awards). Below, we’ve rounded up some of our editor-approved, holy grail supportive sports bra recommendations that are ideal for high-impact sports like running, low-impact activities like yoga, and everything in between.All products featured on SELF are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Tallulah Willis, an ‘Antsy-Handed Chronic Picker,’ Shared New Skin Transformation Photos

Tallulah Willis, an ‘Antsy-Handed Chronic Picker,’ Shared New Skin Transformation Photos

Tallulah Willis is celebrating the huge progress she’s made on her skin health journey. Willis, who has previously spoken about compulsively picking at her skin, shared an ecstatic Instagram post this week showing just how much her face has improved after a few months of taking good care of her skin. “Updates from an antsy handed chronic picker ! we have *ascended* to peak alien dewy supple goals,” Willis wrote alongside a series of photos (and a video) documenting her skin’s transformation in reverse chronological order.Willis chalks up the progress to a “a divine symphony” of specialists and skin-care brands she tagged in the post, including a dermatologist and aesthetician—as well as four months free of skin picking. “NOT TOUCHIN MY PRECIOUS DELICATE FACE W GRUBBY NAILS IN 4 – COUNT EM’ – 4 MONTHS 🙃🙃🙃” she wrote. “I don’t think I’ve ever used this many emojis, or felt so motivated to brag – but I am truly forkin proud !!!”In the earlier images, Willis’s acne, inflammation, and scabbing are visible. In the caption, Willis noted the “handlebar ‘stache of scab” that occurred two days before she was scheduled to appear on Good Morning America and do a photoshoot for Vogue. “What a ride it has truly been!” wrote Willis.Willis, who previously spoke to SELF about her how rewarding it’s been to share her struggles with skin-picking on Instagram, concluded her post by speculating that her skin’s health might regress at some point. “All this being said, I am most likely going to sabotage all this progress,” Willis wrote, “but until then I am going to marinate in an attitude of gratitude.” A serious skin-picking habit can be a form of body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRB). This is a group of disorders in which people compulsively touch their skin or hair in ways that result in both physical damage and psychological distress, such as nail-biting or hair-pulling. Some people with BFRBs also have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In skin-picking disorder, sometimes called excoriation or dermatillomania, the person compulsively picks at their skin (or rubs, scratches, scrapes, or digs into it) in a way that damages the skin (like scarring, scabbing, or discoloration) and find it difficult to stop the behavior. Sometimes people focus the picking on acne, blemishes, or areas of dry skin. 

Sportmax RTW Spring 2022

Sportmax RTW Spring 2022

In the Max Mara system, Sportmax is definitely the edgier, more experimental brand. With this spring collection, the label confirmed this role, unveiling a cool collection that offered new interpretations of the Sportmax stylistic codes.
Inspired by the dichotomy between “order and chaos, light and obscurity,” as highlighted in the show’s notes, fashion director Grazia Malagoli delivered a charming lineup focused on contrasts. In particular, this season the brand’s signature urban minimalism was paired with baroque, opulent elements for an interesting clash: streamlined pants, second-skin knitted overalls, elongated blazers and baggy pants with a ’90s vibe were juxtaposed with gathered and draped ethereal dresses, crafted from gauze, silk georgette and tulle.

Corsetry elements, including laced-up details and exposed bras, stressed the feminine attitude of some of the looks, while an athletic, almost adventurous vibe, was introduced in the lineup via parachute-like straps and tone-on-tone maxi backpacks — the survival bags of Sportmax girls.
The soundtrack, composed by Teho Teardo specifically for the show using his signature microscope sounds, enhanced the overall feeling of being suspended in time in the bright dawn of a new world — a happy one for the Sportmax brand.

MM6 Maison Margiela RTW Spring 2022

MM6 Maison Margiela RTW Spring 2022

Ah, the simple pleasure of sitting on a café terrace for an aperitivo. The MM6 Maison Margiela team left boxed snacks, including pickled onions in a jar painted white, offered beer and gin cocktails and then served up a compact, quirky collection of white suiting and black dresses with extra sleeves here and there; warped chessboard prints galore, and a hilarious faux-fur roller suitcase in collaboration with Eastpak.
The look: Power suits, soigné evening gowns and rugged streetwear with a surrealist bent, all the way through to clownish, checkerboard printed ensembles with neck ruffs. Surrrealist female artists Claude Cahun, Leonora Carrington and Dorothea Tanning were among the muses for the design team.

Quote of note: “Sleeves and gloves become key vehicles for the collection’s surreal undertones, protruding from trouser waistbands, bag handles and even the back panels of a leather jacket, and traces of the making process are felt in a kraft paper bustier and an intricately pleated calico ruff skirt.”
Key pieces: Black evening columns made of elegantly sagging lining fabric; and taut biker jackets with extra sleeves hugging the waist.
Takeaway: If you’re plotting a “The Queen’s Gambit” party or binge rewatch, you’ll be spoiled for choice for chessboard-patterned clothes.

Who Qualifies for COVID-19 Booster Shots? The CDC Approved Them for These 4 Groups

Who Qualifies for COVID-19 Booster Shots? The CDC Approved Them for These 4 Groups

After weeks of anticipation, both the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have now weighed in on COVID-19 booster shots. And they’ve decided that four groups of people, which includes a huge swath of the population, should be eligible for the shots.Here’s who now qualifies for Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 booster shots, according to a CDC press release outlining the recommendations:People who are 65 years and older and those who live in long-term care facilities should get booster shots.People who are between the ages of 50 and 64 who have an underlying medical condition that puts them at risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms should get a booster shot.Those who are between the ages of 18 and 49 who have an underlying medical condition that makes them more likely to develop severe COVID-19 symptoms may get a booster shot if they wish, depending on their individual potential risks and benefits of the shot.People between the ages of 18 and 49 who face an increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission due to their occupational or institutional setting may receive a booster shot if they want. But the decision to do so depends on the risks and benefits of the shot for each individual.For all of these groups, the recommendations only apply to those who received a Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for their first doses. And they can only get a booster dose if it’s been at least six months since their first shots. Neither the FDA nor the CDC has ruled yet on whether or not it’s okay for people to mix and match which vaccines they get (if, for instance, someone got the Moderna vaccine initially and gets a Pfizer booster shot).The COVID-19 booster shot conversation kicked off in the U.S. in earnest when the White House announced a plan to offer third vaccine doses to the general public last month. Based on data mainly from Israel, it appeared that protection against COVID-19 infections (but not so much against hospitalization and death) was waning among those who received their first shots early on. After an FDA advisory panel recommended authorizing Pfizer booster doses for specific groups of people (primarily those over age 65), the agency updated the vaccine’s emergency use authorization to allow that use. Then, over the past two days, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met to discuss the potential recommendations around who should actually receive booster doses.Some of the most compelling evidence for the use of COVID-19 booster shots that ACIP saw yesterday was for older populations, many of whom were prioritized during the initial vaccine rollout phase and are generally at a higher risk for severe complications from the virus. The panel weighed the potential benefits and risks of administering third doses to other age groups (including the risk for myocarditis, which is most likely to affect young men), underlying medical conditions, and certain occupational risk factors that make them more likely to be exposed to the virus (especially with the highly transmissible delta variant now dominant in the country). 

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